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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Hong-Youl Ha, Joby John, J. Denise John and Yong-Kyun Chung

The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal effects of perceptions of information obtained from social networks (SNS) on online shopping behavior using trust as a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal effects of perceptions of information obtained from social networks (SNS) on online shopping behavior using trust as a mediator. The model adopts the two dimensional view of trust: cognitive and affective trust. The direct effects and indirect effects of information perceptions on behavioral intentions are empirically explored using a longitudinal approach. Specifically, we investigate the comparative roles of cognitive and affective trust on the influence of perceptions of information from SNS on online shopping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was fielded at two points in time (T and T+1) that were approximately 14 months apart. The survey (T) was distributed via e-mail to 1,484 prospects. From this mailing, 297 prospects who had not replied and another 145 with missing data were removed, leaving 1,042 respondents. In all, 14 months later, the survey (T+1) was e-mailed to these 1,042 respondents who took part in the survey at time point T. At time point T+1, only 341 respondents from the original sample responded. After excluding those with missing values, the final sample included 313 respondents.

Findings

The results show significant carryover effects from time T to time T+1 in perceptions of information obtained from a social network, in behavioral intentions and in both dimensions of trust. Furthermore, the study revealed that over time, the influence of affective trust is greater than that of cognitive trust, both in its effect on behavioral intentions as well as in its mediating role between information perceptions and behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature on the mediating roles of cognitive and affective trust in the development of behavioral intentions on over time in the social network environment.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kofi Q. Dadzie, Charlene A. Dadzie and Alvin J. Williams

This study aims to examine how various components of interpersonal trust (affective and cognitive) influence the duration of buyer-seller relationships in the emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how various components of interpersonal trust (affective and cognitive) influence the duration of buyer-seller relationships in the emerging market (EM) context of a heterogeneous market structure dominated by small, fragmented sellers/suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a hazard model for analyzing duration effects of interpersonal trust in the EM context. The model was validated using data on buying agents provided by 340 cocoa sellers/producers in Ghana, gathered from extensive field interviews.

Findings

Results of the survival analysis reveal a limited but significant positive duration effect of cognitive (ability) trust only. Further analysis of sellers’ duration intentions (intention to remain with a buyer) also reveals a positive impact of affective trust but no impact of cognitive (ability and integrity) trust. Cocoa bean sellers’ evaluation of buying firms’ purchasing agents suggests that buying firms underperform on emotional/affective components of interpersonal trust, and that private firms outperform state buying agents on ability trust as well.

Research limitations/implications

While this study focused on the fragmented nature of sellers in the EM context, and the scope was limited to the sellers’ interpersonal trust perception of the buyer-seller, future research should examine both buyer and seller perceptions to obtain complete insight into the buyer-seller dyad in the EM context. In addition, the results of the duration effects identified in this study may not be generalizable to other EM export commodities, where channels have long been fully privatized. Ghana’s cocoa export marketing system was only recently privatized, and potentially has more sellers at the risk of adopting/switching relationships with their buyers than would be expected in more privatized expert commodity marketing systems.

Practical implications

Managers of export commodity buying firms in EMs can take advantage of the positive duration effects of cognitive trust by constantly improving the capabilities of their purchasing agents throughout the lifetime of their suppliers to sustain their relationship. However, sellers’ intention to switch can be mitigated by formalizing policies that encourage emotional bonds with sellers, especially small-scale producers in highly vulnerable bargaining positions. The aggregate output of small-scale producers could be of strategic importance in the future.

Originality/value

Managers need systematic empirical evidence of the nature of duration effects of interpersonal trust given anecdotal evidence suggesting that managers have a tendency to emphasize cognitive trust over affective/emotional trust. Further, the applicability of such evidence in the EM context is critical given unique conditions such as highly fragmented sellers dealing with relatively large corporations.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Peter E. Swift and Alvin Hwang

This paper seeks to add to the research on the role of cognitive and affective trust in promoting knowledge sharing between executives and consequently establishing an…

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5647

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to add to the research on the role of cognitive and affective trust in promoting knowledge sharing between executives and consequently establishing an organizational learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the influence of one conceptualization of trust, one that has two sub‐constructs – affective (emotional) trust and cognitive (rational) trust – on knowledge sharing among 157 marketing and sales executives.

Findings

The results indicate that affective trust is more important than cognitive trust in sharing interpersonal knowledge, but cognitive trust is more important in creating an organizational learning environment.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study was limited to the marketing and sales functions in business to consumer companies. Knowledge sharing is an acute issue in this industry and the results may not be completely applicable to less competitive industries or business functions. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further in other industries and business functions.

Practical implications

The results indicate that organizations should focus on organizational processes which promote both affective and cognitive trust. Such processes include job rotation to improve cognitive understanding and employee screening for affective trust traits.

Originality/value

To date, much of the planned organizational learning efforts have been focused on outside interventions (i.e. training seminars, meetings, etc.) that have value but are limited in their ability to generate sustained levels of trust. To increase knowledge sharing and consequent organizational learning benefits, results of this study indicate that organizations should encourage cognitive and affective trust building endeavours.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Sampath Kumar Ranganathan, Vivek Madupu, Sandipan Sen and John R. Brooks

The purpose of this study is to identity cognitive and affective determinants of customer loyalty towards e-mail services, including interrelationships, and to understand…

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3288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identity cognitive and affective determinants of customer loyalty towards e-mail services, including interrelationships, and to understand the process by which the cognitive and affective antecedents influence customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to gather data from Gmail users. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate electronic service quality and e-trust (cognitive) impact customer loyalty through affective variables like emotions, satisfaction, e-trust (affective) and affective commitment. Results also indicate that e-mail service providers who intend to build long term relationships with their customers will benefit by investing in emotional factors along with cognitive factors.

Research limitations/implications

A predominantly male audience responded to the research query based on one e-mail service setting. Based on the responses, it was determined that e-mail service providers can benefit by building emotional bonds with customers. Enhancing consumption emotions leads to development of emotional bonds and customer loyalty.

Originality/value

Much of the extant literature has examined the role played by cognitive antecedent variables in determining e-loyalty. Studies that researched the role of affective variables are scant. This paper is unique in that it examines both cognitive and affective variables in determining e-loyalty. This study differs from other studies in that it uses antecedents such as emotions, affective commitment, and e-trust (affective) to determine customer loyalty toward e-mail services. Interrelationships among the antecedents were also explored.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Fanbo Meng, Xitong Guo, Zeyu Peng, Qiang Ye and Kee-Hung Lai

Mobile health (mHealth) services are considered an important means of relieving the problems of the aging population. The efficiency of mHealth services can be enhanced by…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile health (mHealth) services are considered an important means of relieving the problems of the aging population. The efficiency of mHealth services can be enhanced by engaging more elderly users and guaranteeing their continued use. However, limited attention has been directed toward investigating elderly users' continuance intention regarding mHealth services. The purpose of this paper is to explain elderly users' continuance intention by investigating the contingent role of technology anxiety and health anxiety on affective trust and cognitive trust.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 232 elderly users to verify the research model and hypotheses based on structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

This study revealed that both affective and cognitive trust enhance elderly users' continuance intention regarding their use of mHealth services. Health anxiety strengthens the effect of cognitive trust but weakens the effect of affective trust with regard to continuance intention. Furthermore, technology anxiety strengthens the effect of affective trust but not the effect of cognitive trust with regard to continuance intention.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine elderly users' continuance intention regarding mHealth services use from the perspective of affective and cognitive trust, thus enriching the extant literature on the use of mHealth services. Additionally, this study sheds light on the contingent effects of technology anxiety and health anxiety on affective and cognitive trust, which have been neglected by previous research.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Houcine Akrout, Mbaye Fall Diallo, Wafa Akrout and Jean-Louis Chandon

This paper aims to develop and validate a scale measurement of trust in long-term relations, specifically in the maintenance phase, between buyers and sellers. Relying on…

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2619

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and validate a scale measurement of trust in long-term relations, specifically in the maintenance phase, between buyers and sellers. Relying on a cognitive conception, existing scales do not measure the affective trust occurring in the maintenance stage of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Three surveys were conducted with purchasing managers of enterprises in various business-to-business (B2B) sectors to build a bi-dimensional measurement scale of affective trust as a sentiment of security and affective attachment. For measurement scale development, established construction procedures were followed, including qualitative and quantitative surveys. The process can be summarized as: domain specification, generation of questionnaire items, empirical survey and iterative process of scale purification based on reliability assessment and validity checks.

Findings

The results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties of the new Affective Trust Scale (ATS). Furthermore, they demonstrate the scale’s measurement invariance across business sectors. The research confirms the importance of affective aspects of trust and supports the reliability and validity of the measure. Nomological validity assessment of the scale shows that sentiment of security-based trust impacts investment in business relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The ATS developed and tested in the B2B French context needs to be evaluated taking into account several limitations. First, the specific context was a sample of buyers in France experiencing lasting relationships, suggesting that an extension of the study to other countries would be desirable. Also, the ATS needs to be further validated and confirmed in other contexts, for instance, within buyer–supplier relationship intensity.

Practical implications

The ATS can help firms to identify key parameters in buyer–seller relationships. It is important for the seller to collect information to determine the stage of the relationship before spending money on targeting customers, as they may not be ready to broaden the scope of their contract. The ATS can be very useful for companies to assess the state of the relationship and the strength of the bond in a timely manner and, therefore, anticipate the relational orientation. Segmentation based on relational phases requires tailoring to each form of trust strategies and hence the accurate identification of the relationship phase could help to better categorize and subcategorize customers with respect to the sentiment of security and affective attachment degrees. Furthermore, an understanding of the two dimensions is useful for key account managers to adjust relationship management toward specific actions (e.g. sentiment of security and/or affective attachment). The ATS could be very useful to guide managers in taking the right decision, by focusing both on sentiment of security and affective attachment dimensions of affective trust.

Originality/value

Affective trust is important to B2B managers, who frequently struggle to build and maintain close relationships with customers and suppliers. This paper adds insights into the complex but important construct of trust. The scale could be used for empirical studies of affective trust in B2B relationships. It may also help marketing managers develop better relationships with partners.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Yui‐Tim Wong, Hang‐Yue Ngo and Chi‐Sum Wong

This study examines the factors affecting joint venture employees’ affective commitment in the Peoples’ Republic of China. Three theoretical frameworks (i.e. the justice…

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4613

Abstract

This study examines the factors affecting joint venture employees’ affective commitment in the Peoples’ Republic of China. Three theoretical frameworks (i.e. the justice framework, the job security framework and the trust framework) are employed to study the antecedents and the consequence of workers’ affective commitment. The proposed mediation model includes: distributive justice, procedural justice and perceived job security as the antecedents of affective commitment; trust in organization as the mediator; and turnover intention as the outcome variable. The results supported this mediation model. It has been found that trust in organization mediates the relationships between distributive justice, procedural justice, perceived job security and affective commitment. In addition, perceived job security and affective commitment have significant effects on the turnover intention of workers. Finally, the theoretical and practical implications of the present study are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Hanifi Parlar, Muhammet Emin Türkoğlu and Ramazan Cansoy

This study aims to explore the relationship between authoritarian leadership and commitment and the mediating roles of silence and trust in school principals.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationship between authoritarian leadership and commitment and the mediating roles of silence and trust in school principals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional design to illustrate the relationships among authoritarian leadership, trust in the principal, silence and affective commitment using path analysis evidence provided by 409 K–12 teachers.

Findings

The findings revealed that authoritarian leadership indirectly affected teacher commitment through trust in the principal and acquiescent silence. Furthermore, trust in the principal played a partial mediating role between authoritarian leadership and defensive silence. Authoritarian leadership behaviours decreased teachers' affective commitment by decreasing trust in the principal and increasing organisational silence.

Originality/value

Although leadership and culture have been studied intensively in recent years, authoritarian leadership, which is more commonly seen in Eastern societies, has been less studied in school contexts in the Middle East and Asia. Thus, this study contributes to the literature by examining the factors that might influence affective commitment in schools in an urban setting: authoritarian leadership, silence and trust in school principals.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Yong-Ki Lee, Paresha N. Sinha, Soon-Ho Kim, Eric Melvin Swanson, Jae-Jang Yang and Eun-Jung Kim

Hotels conducting international business are acknowledging the importance of an expatriate general manager (GM), to increase the effectiveness of their knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Hotels conducting international business are acknowledging the importance of an expatriate general manager (GM), to increase the effectiveness of their knowledge management system through the sharing of knowledge between expatriates and local employees. In the aspect of comparative leadership studies, this study attempts to compare and analyze the effects of knowledge sharing (KS) efforts, which are competencies of expatriate GMs and local GMs, on employee trust, organizational KS and employee loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees of 7 hotels managed by expatriate GMs among 16 franchising luxury (5-star) hotels, and from employees of 6 hotels operated by local GMs among 9 local luxury hotels located in Korea. Structural equation modeling method using SmartPLS 3.3.3 was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Expatriate GM’s two-way KS influences affective trust but does not influence cognitive trust. Affective trust influences cognitive and organizational KS but does not influence employee loyalty. Cognitive trust does not influence organizational KS but influences employee loyalty. Finally, organizational KS significantly affects employee loyalty. In addition, in the analysis comparing the estimates between expatriate and local GM group, significant differences in groups were found for the impact of GM’s two-way KS on cognitive trust, for the impact of affective trust on organizational KS, for the impact of affective trust on employee loyalty and for the impact of cognitive trust on organizational KS.

Practical implications

This study shows that knowledge management designs need to consider different effects of expatriate GMs’ and local GMs’ capabilities on employee attitudes and behavior considering cultural impacts. Expatriate GMs will greatly benefit their effort for KS by assuring employees that they are attentive to their needs, interests and problems.

Originality/value

This study not only contributes to the existing social capital theory but also provides managerial implications for human resources management in the hospitality field through a comparative study of KS efforts of expatriate and local GMs.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Marsus Suti and Harmita Sari

This paper aims to investigate how social capital (e.g. structural, cognitive and relational) influences trust (e.g. cognitive-/affective-based trust), which includes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how social capital (e.g. structural, cognitive and relational) influences trust (e.g. cognitive-/affective-based trust), which includes influencing knowledge-sharing behavior for Indonesian Facebook users in the context of social networking sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Indonesian students were recruited for an online survey study. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Social capital has a crucial role in increasing cognitive-based trust and affective-based trust. Furthermore, affective-based trust is a partial mediator between social capital and knowledge-sharing behavior, whereas cognitive-based trust is a full mediator between social capital and knowledge-sharing behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to Indonesian Facebook users. Future research needs to examine specific conditions, situational contexts and sub-cultures that may influence social capital, trust and knowledge-sharing behaviors of Facebook users in other parts of the world.

Practical implications

The education stakeholders can identify the user objectives and rational concerns to improve their social capital and trust and support their valuable and unique experiences to share knowledge.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on virtual communities. Specifically, it considers how social capital influences trust, which subsequently affects knowledge-sharing behavior based on the uses and gratifications theory among Facebook users.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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