Search results

1 – 10 of over 19000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Seohee Chang

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically formulate the plausibility of affective recalling through the analysis of different psychological theories and assumptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically formulate the plausibility of affective recalling through the analysis of different psychological theories and assumptions and develops the theory of vacation happiness bias on the emergence of some variations on affective recalling and forecasting intertwined with dispositional affect, affect regulation and types of situational affect.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a non-empirical method to find gaps in the literature and the existing theories and build a new theoretical model, vacation happiness bias.

Findings

The theory of vacation happiness bias accounts for how the modified focalism model that is expanded to affective recalling beyond affective forecasting works, and thus the modified model is better accounted particularly for the vacation field. In addition, the theory of vacation happiness bias explains how different types of affect and affect regulation are intertwined with one another within the modified focalism frame, thereby yielding some variation. Recalled vacation experiences are more positive than vacation experiences as of the present as a result of affect that is controlled through affect regulation merged with social desirability bias.

Originality/value

Research in tourism and psychology fields has not yet deemed affective recalling, even though affective recalling would likely be more salient in the vacation context that is different from the context of daily life.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Marjan J. Gorgievski, Juan Antonio Moriano and Arnold B. Bakker

Building on the dualistic approach to passion, the aim of this paper was to examine how work engagement and workaholism relate to entrepreneurs' performance (innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the dualistic approach to passion, the aim of this paper was to examine how work engagement and workaholism relate to entrepreneurs' performance (innovative behavior, business growth, and subjective business performance).

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey data of 180 Spanish entrepreneurs were analyzed using partial least squares modeling.

Findings

Evidence was found for a dual affective pathway to performance. Work engagement related favorably to performance through its relationship with more positive affect and less negative affect. Workaholism related to more negative affect, which in turn related negatively to performance. After controlling for affective states, both work engagement and workaholism still had a direct and positive association with innovative behavior.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are the cross-sectional design and the reliance on self-report measures; although self-reports of business growth can be considered indicative of objective business performance. Bi-directional relationships between the study variables seem plausible. The dualistic approach to passion is a sound theoretical basis for future research on drivers and consequences of work engagement and workaholism.

Practical implications

The findings imply that entrepreneurial success can be enhanced by improving entrepreneurs' emotion-regulation strategies to manage their affective states. Workaholics especially would benefit from such strategies.

Social implications

Improving entrepreneurial performance has value for society via counteracting economic decline and creation of wealth and jobs.

Originality/value

This study adds to our limited understanding of the consequences of work engagement and workaholism. It addresses entrepreneurs, who are an under researched occupational group.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Crystal Fulton

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the affective aspect of information seeking is important in understanding information behaviour from a holistic perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the affective aspect of information seeking is important in understanding information behaviour from a holistic perspective. While researchers have often explored adverse affective responses and coping mechanisms in information behaviour, this paper aims to focus on positive affect and the significant place of pleasure in amateur genealogists' information seeking and skills development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a multi‐case, exploratory approach to learning about amateur genealogists' affective behaviour associated with their information seeking. A total of 24 amateur genealogists from around the world participated in semi‐structured telephone interviews about their hunt for their Irish ancestors. Data were transcribed and analyzed to identify patterns of affective behaviour during genealogical information seeking.

Findings

The paper finds that amateur genealogists form a unique group of information seekers. Leisure functions as an important information seeking context, in which amateur genealogists associate information seeking with pleasure.

Originality/value

Findings suggest that there is a pleasure principle associated with information seeking, which may offer insight into patterns of affective information behaviour leading to advanced learning, information use, and technological adoption among older adults.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yi‐Chieh Wang and Rian Beise‐Zee

The purpose of this paper is to study the service responses of service providers to the affective states of business clients and to test whether they have a positive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the service responses of service providers to the affective states of business clients and to test whether they have a positive effect on the client's job performance, as well as their satisfaction and bonding to the service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on a survey of 240 business travellers in Taiwan. Ordinary least square regression is applied to test the relationships.

Findings

Statistical tests confirm that service responses to emotional states have a positive effect on customer satisfaction, job performance and bonding. While service responses aimed at easing customers’ emotional problems increase satisfaction and job performance, true bonding is only facilitated through service responses that are centred on affection and social‐emotional support.

Research limitations/implications

The authors investigate the personal service encounter with business customers who are using the service to perform a task. The findings are applicable to services that deal with customers in a similar way.

Practical implications

The paper shows that appropriate service responses to emotional states of customers, including business customers, can lead to higher satisfaction and bonding to the service provider. Service responses enable business customers to perform better.

Originality/value

The authors apply the concept of pre‐consumption emotions of customers to business clients. While pre‐consumption emotional states of customers have been studied much less that the elicitation of customer emotions, in the business‐to‐business sector emotions are seldom addressed. However, the study demonstrates that emotions are an important input factor that clients bring into the service encounter, which service providers can deal with to their competitive advantage.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mohammed Ismail El-Adly and Amjad Abu ELSamen

This paper aims to measure customer-based brand equity in the context of hotels, and to develop and empirically validate a new scale, named guest-based hotel equity…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure customer-based brand equity in the context of hotels, and to develop and empirically validate a new scale, named guest-based hotel equity (GBHE), by incorporating the customer perceived value of hotels as a multidimensional construct in addition to its traditional dimensions (i.e. brand awareness and brand image).

Design/methodology/approach

A structured and self-administered survey was used, targeting 348 hotel guests who were surveyed about their experience with the last hotel they had stayed in during the previous year. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, convergent and discriminant validity and composite reliability.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that GBHE is a multidimensional construct with nine dimensions, namely, hotel awareness, hotel overall image and seven dimensions of customer perceived value (i.e. the values of price, quality, self-gratification, aesthetics, prestige, transaction and hedonism). The new scale is found to have excellent psychometric properties; it has demonstrated its predictive power on behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors believe that the sample size was reasonable and adequate for conducting CFA analysis, a bigger sample would be better and might increase the robustness of the proposed scale. In addition, to avoid the retrieval failure problem, hotel guests should be surveyed just after their stay in the hotel or not long afterwards. Further, the hotel classification or hotel star rating was not considered in developing and validating the GBHE scale.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide hotel managers with a new tool to use in assessing the experiential value of the hotel brand equity, other than conventional hotel awareness and brand image. Further, using the multidimensional construct of perceived value provides hotel managers with more insights into what aspects of hotel brand equity they should focus on to influence the behavioral intentions of their guests.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is highlighted in several points. First, it develops and empirically validates a new scale to measure customer-based brand equity in the hotel context, that is, GBHE. Second, it incorporates the customer perceived value of hotels not as a unidimensional construct that is concerned only with cost, but as a multi-dimensional construct which includes in the GBHE scale dimensions that are both cognitive (i.e. of price and quality) and affective (i.e. of self-gratification, aesthetics, prestige, transaction and hedonism) in addition to its traditional dimensions (i.e. brand awareness and brand image). Third, it assesses the predictive power and relative importance of the GBHE dimensions for behavioral intentions (i.e. loyalty to hotels). Finally, no research has been done so far on the brand equity of hotels in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), although it is considered a fertile soil for tourism in the Arabian region.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Hyunjoo Im, Sharron J. Lennon and Leslie Stoel

Visual information quality is one of the most important elements that determines online shoppers' experience on a web site. Yet, currently many e‐tailers use poor quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Visual information quality is one of the most important elements that determines online shoppers' experience on a web site. Yet, currently many e‐tailers use poor quality visual information such as small and blurry images. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of visual information quality on online shoppers' affective responses and behavioral intent toward the web site. The theoretical framework of perceptual fluency, the ease with which perceptual forms (i.e. objects) are processed, guided the research.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model was developed based on the literature and tested using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). The model proposed a mediating effect of pleasure in creating positive aesthetic evaluations and behavioral outcomes of the perceptual fluency effect. An online experiment (n=1,999) was employed with two levels of perceptual fluency.

Findings

MANOVA results confirmed the perceptual fluency effect on aesthetic evaluation and pleasure. SEM analysis supported the proposed model. Pleasure had a stronger impact on behavioral intent than aesthetic evaluation. Theoretical and managerial implications of the perceptual fluency effect on online consumer behavior are discussed.

Originality/value

Previous research has not addressed perceptual fluency from a strong theoretical framework. The paper empirically tested and extended the perceptual fluency hypothesis. Although previous researchers observed the fluency effect on preference choices without testing the mediating effect of affect, this paper examined the mediating role of affect and confirmed the importance of pleasure in aesthetic evaluation. Also, this paper extends the scope of the perceptual fluency effect beyond aesthetic preference/evaluations to behavioral intent.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Chris Heywood, Gregory Missingham and Russell Kenley

This paper aims to establish a basis for considering and then studying the affective psychology found in subjective assessments encountered in managing facility provision…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a basis for considering and then studying the affective psychology found in subjective assessments encountered in managing facility provision, in this case in Australian local government.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature was used to construct a suite of models that provides a legitimate basis to consider affective, subjective and other assessments in the field. A psychologically‐based orientational qualitative enquiry using an Affective Lexicon was used for an empirical study.

Findings

The study found that affect is pervasive in the management of local government facilities. It was found in expectations facility management has concerning consequences of its work, stakeholders' expectations and evaluations, and had utility in managing facility projects. A Scheme of Affective Management is proposed that uses a suite of techniques to achieve affective outcomes and consequences from facility management. These results challenge so‐called objectivity in the field.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical study occurred in Australian local government but it is likely that the results are generalisable to other countries and also to the private sector and could apply more generally to effective facility management.

Practical implications

A Scheme of Affective Management is introduced that provides a suite of practices that could be employed to manage facility projects' affective outcomes.

Originality/value

The field embraces the psychology of facilities. This paper is a very early example that demonstrates that considering psychology in the management of facilities is also important.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jaclyn Koopmann, Mo Wang, Yihao Liu and Yifan Song

In this chapter, we summarize and build on the current state of the customer mistreatment literature in an effort to further future research on this topic. First, we…

Abstract

In this chapter, we summarize and build on the current state of the customer mistreatment literature in an effort to further future research on this topic. First, we detail the four primary conceptualizations of customer mistreatment. Second, we present a multilevel model of customer mistreatment, which distinguishes between the unfolding processes at the individual employee level and the service encounter level. In particular, we consider the antecedents and outcomes unique to each level of analysis as well as mediators and moderators. Finally, we discuss important methodological concerns and recommendations for future research.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jiun‐Sheng Chris Lin and Cheng‐Yu Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of emotional contagion in service encounters by proposing and testing an empirical model of the antecedents and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of emotional contagion in service encounters by proposing and testing an empirical model of the antecedents and consequences of affective service delivery by employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework of the antecedents and outcomes of employee affective delivery in service interactions is developed on the basis of relevant studies in marketing, psychology, and organization. In total, nine hypothesized relationships between the constructs in the conceptual model are proposed and tested by structural equation modeling using data collected from 217 employee‐customer pairs in ten service industries.

Findings

Results showed that employee inner emotion, work group mood, and service environment all have a positive influence on employee affective delivery, which, in turn, positively influences customer emotion and service outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This study represents an early attempt at exploring the antecedents of employee affective delivery in service context. Future research is discussed, with an emphasis on characteristics of employees/customers, employee experiences, and service norm.

Practical implications

Managers of service firms should recognize the importance of the drivers of employee positive displayed emotion. Service firms can benefit from focusing their attention on enhancing affective service delivery.

Originality/value

This study described in this paper addresses important research gaps in the service marketing literature by: empirically examining the antecedents of employee affective delivery in service interactions; and providing the first test of emotional contagion and its related processes with data collected from ten different service industries, rather than a single industry.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 19000