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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Kerry Shephard

The purpose of this paper is to interpret aspects of education for sustainability in relation to educational theories of the affective domain (values, attitudes and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interpret aspects of education for sustainability in relation to educational theories of the affective domain (values, attitudes and behaviours) and suggest how the use of these theories, and relevant experience, in other educational areas could benefit education for sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis based on a literature review of relevant educational endeavours in affective learning.

Findings

This paper suggests that most teaching and assessment in higher education focus on cogitative skills of knowledge and understanding rather than on affective outcomes of values, attitudes and behaviours. Some areas of higher education, however, have effectively pursued affective outcomes and these use particular learning and teaching activities to do so. Key issues for consideration include assessing outcomes and evaluating courses, providing academic credit for affective outcomes, key roles for role models and designing realistic and acceptable learning outcomes in the affective domain.

Practical implications

Educators for sustainability could use this relevant theoretical underpinning and experience gained in other areas of education to address the impact of their own learner‐support activities.

Originality/value

Educators have traditionally been reluctant to pursue affective learning outcomes but often programmes of study simply fail to identify and describe their legitimate aims in these terms. This paper emphasises the application of a relevant theoretical underpinning to support educators' legitimate aspirations for affective learning outcomes. It will also help these educators to reflect on how the use of these approaches accords with the liberal traditions of higher education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Omaymah Radwan, Simin Ghavifekr and Ahmad Zabidi Abdul Razak

The main purpose is to analyse the effect of academic leadership competencies (LCs) on student learning outcomes (SLOs) in terms of cognitive, skill and affective aspects.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose is to analyse the effect of academic leadership competencies (LCs) on student learning outcomes (SLOs) in terms of cognitive, skill and affective aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised quantitative research that focussed on correlation design by randomly distributing questionnaires containing 53 items to a total of 496 faculty members in Saudi Arabia public higher education institutions (HEIs). The data was analysed using SPSS (V.24) and SEM-AMOS.

Findings

Results show a direct and significant effect of academic LC on students' cognitive, skill and affective learning outcomes in public HEIs.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation was that the participants of public HEIs were from Saudi Arabia. However, the findings have provided valuable understandings and a comprehensive conclusion about the impact of academic LC on SLOs in terms of cognitive, skill and affective aspects. The study recommended that different LC should be further developed. Future studies proposed to investigate the factors that support academic leaders to affect SLOs directly in HEIs.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the significant and direct effect of academic LC on SLOs in HEIs. The findings have the potential to reflect positively on the academic leaders in public HEIs. The findings act as a guide for HEIs in terms of the importance of academic LC for having desirable SLOs. This study is crucial for educational policymakers and practitioners of academic leadership as the academic leaders' effort will greatly contribute to the HEIs as well as the nation's development in general.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Ree Chan Ho and Bee Lian Song

This study aims to examine live streaming experiences of business students’ at the tertiary education level, and how the use of this interactive platform satisfies their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine live streaming experiences of business students’ at the tertiary education level, and how the use of this interactive platform satisfies their affective, cognitive, social and hedonic needs in learning. Likewise, it explored the influence of live streaming class on the learning outcome needed in achieving self-directed learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the uses and gratifications theory, a conceptual framework was developed to discover the impact of interactive live streaming platform in meeting learners’ needs required for self-directed learning. A survey was conducted with a sample of 402 business undergraduate students from 5 universities. Data was analyzed with covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study confirmed that learners’ gratifications gained from live streaming encouraged them to collaborate with the instructors in meeting the learning outcomes. The findings also supported that the interactive nature of live streaming offers the opportunity for students to learn independently. Thus, it sheds new light on how a live streaming learning environment can be further developed in promoting self-directed learning.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel understanding of live stream class adoption by examining learners’ needs from a uses and gratification perspective. It also contributed new insight to the existing literature on live streaming technology use in education to promote self-directed learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Leopold Bayerlein and Debora Jeske

The purpose of this paper is to provide a student learning outcome focussed assessment of the benefits and limitations of traditional internships, e-internships, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a student learning outcome focussed assessment of the benefits and limitations of traditional internships, e-internships, and simulated internships to evaluate the potential of computer-mediated internships (CMIs) (e-internships and simulated internships) within higher education from a student perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes a systematic conceptually based assessment of the extent to which CMIs are able to replicate the cognitive, skill-based and affective learning outcomes of traditional internships. In addition, the key limitations of traditional internships from a student perspective are identified, and the potential ability of CMIs to address these limitations is assessed.

Findings

The findings of this paper highlight that CMIs are able to replicate most of the benefits of traditional internships, whilst concurrently addressing many of their limitations. However, the current paper also identifies a number of important limitations for student learning in CMIs, and provides advice that aims to assist students in maximising their learning outcomes in these situations.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to provide a systematic student learning outcome focussed comparison of traditional internships and CMIs. In addition, the paper establishes the high potential of simulated internships for student learning in higher education, and provides students, higher education providers and researcher with learning outcome focussed criteria sets that enable the empirical evaluation of CMIs in future research.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Lola C. Duque and John R. Weeks

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to introduce a conceptual model for assessing undergraduate student learning outcomes and satisfaction that involves…

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3359

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to introduce a conceptual model for assessing undergraduate student learning outcomes and satisfaction that involves concepts drawn from the services marketing and assessment literatures; second, to illustrate the utility of the model as implemented in an academic department (geography) within a large American university, and third, to demonstrate the applicability of the model by replicating the study at different scales: an entire undergraduate program (business administration) in a large Spanish university and another program (nursing) involving various universities of a Spanish region.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method approach is used which comprises quadrant analysis, ANOVA tests and structural equation modeling techniques. A questionnaire was designed for data collection.

Findings

The main finding is the support found for the proposed model at different scales. Results of the multi‐method approach provide specific guidelines to departments using this approach to improve student learning outcomes and satisfaction.

Practical implications

The paper provides a conceptual model and supporting tools that can be used by other academic departments or higher education institutions to assist in the evaluation of how students perceive their learning outcomes and satisfaction with their undergraduate program.

Originality/value

The value of this multi‐method approach is that it is simple to implement, and at the same time provides a richness of information for diagnosis and decision‐making. The model was tested with data collected in different undergraduate programs and different countries, allowing the authors not only to find support for the model, but also to consider cultural differences among student perceptions.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Anita Lee-Post

The purpose of this paper is to present an educational approach to elevating problem-solving and numeracy competencies of business undergraduates to meet workplace demand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an educational approach to elevating problem-solving and numeracy competencies of business undergraduates to meet workplace demand. The approach is grounded in the theory of constraints following the Decoding the Discipline model. The authors investigated a cognitive bottleneck involving problem modeling and an affective bottleneck concerning low self-efficacy of numeracy and designed specific interventions to address both bottlenecks simultaneously. The authors implemented the proposed approach in an introductory level analytics course in business operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an empirical study to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in addressing deficiency in numeracy and problem-solving skills. Cognitive and affective learning interventions were introduced in an undergraduate core course in analytics. The perceived effectiveness of the interventions was evaluated with the use of a survey at the end of the course. To further investigate the effectiveness of the proposed interventions beyond self-reporting, the impact of the interventions on actual learning was evaluated by comparing the exam scores between classes with and without the interventions.

Findings

Students who underwent the interventions successfully overcame both learning bottlenecks and indicated a positive change in attitude toward the analytics discipline as well as achieved higher exam scores in the analytics course.

Research limitations/implications

This study succeeds in strengthening the body of research in teaching and learning. The authors also offer a holistic treatment of cognitive and affective learning bottlenecks, and provide empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of the proposed approach in elevating numeracy and problem-solving competencies of business undergraduates.

Practical implications

The proposed approach is useful for business educators to improve business students’ quantitative modeling skill and attitude. Researchers can also extend the approach to other courses and settings to build up the body of research in learning and skill development. Educational policy makers may consider promoting promising approaches to improve students’ quantitative skill development. They can also set a high standard for higher education institutions to assess students’ numeracy and problem-solving competencies. Employers will find college graduates bring to their initial positions the high levels of numeracy and problem-solving skills demanded for knowledge work to sustain business growth and innovation.

Social implications

As students’ numeracy and problem-solving skills are raised, they will develop an aptitude for quantitative-oriented coursework that equips them with the set of quantitative information-processing skills needed to succeed in the twenty-first century society and global economy.

Originality/value

The proposed approach provides a goal-oriented three-step process to improve learning by overcoming learning bottlenecks as constraints of a learning process. The integral focus on identifying learning bottlenecks, creating learning interventions and assessing learning outcomes in the proposed approach is instrumental in introducing manageable interventions to address challenges in student learning thereby elevating students’ numeracy and problem-solving competencies.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Leony Derick, Gayane Sedrakyan, Pedro J. Munoz-Merino, Carlos Delgado Kloos and Katrien Verbert

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate four visualizations that represent affective states of students.

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1339

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate four visualizations that represent affective states of students.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical-experimental study approach was used to assess the usability of affective state visualizations in a learning context. The first study was conducted with students who had knowledge of visualization techniques (n=10). The insights from this pilot study were used to improve the interpretability and ease of use of the visualizations. The second study was conducted with the improved visualizations with students who had no or limited knowledge of visualization techniques (n=105).

Findings

The results indicate that usability, measured by perceived usefulness and insight, is overall acceptable. However, the findings also suggest that interpretability of some visualizations, in terms of the capability to support emotional awareness, still needs to be improved. The level of students’ awareness of their emotions during learning activities based on the visualization interpretation varied depending on previous knowledge of information visualization techniques. Awareness was found to be high for the most frequently experienced emotions and activities that were the most frustrating, but lower for more complex insights such as interpreting differences with peers. Furthermore, simpler visualizations resulted in better outcomes than more complex techniques.

Originality/value

Detection of affective states of students and visualizations of these states in computer-based learning environments have been proposed to support student awareness and improve learning. However, the evaluation of visualizations of these affective states with students to support awareness in real life settings is an open issue.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Katriina Soini, Kaisa Korhonen-Kurki and Henna Asikainen

The purpose of this study is to explore the learning outcomes of the project-based learning in a Master Class programme on sustainability carried out in collaboration by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the learning outcomes of the project-based learning in a Master Class programme on sustainability carried out in collaboration by the University of Helsinki and a private company operating in global mining technology. The following two questions were addressed: Q1. What kind of sustainability competences do participants acquire in the Master Class? Q2. What is the role of PBL in the learning outcomes?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on an ex ante open-ended survey and post-ante interviews addressed to the participants. The data were analysed using the qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The findings show that the Master Class contributed to most of the competences under study. However, unlike in previous studies, systemic thinking is highlighted as a fundamental rather than a parallel core competence. Furthermore, the results also emphasise the role of emotions, which is insufficiently acknowledged and accounted for in sustainability education.

Research limitations/implications

The study focussed only on the learning outcomes of the participants (students) and not the other parties (such as company and researchers).

Practical implications

Future research should focus on affective dimension as a stepping stone to the transformational learning. In addition, the role of the systemic understanding in sustainability education should be highlighted as a core competence.

Social implications

The study revealed the overall positive impacts of the co-creation in university – business collaboration to the participants’ sustainability competences.

Originality/value

The study presents an empirical case study where the various competence frameworks were applied with a result of confirming the validity of the existing key competences, in particular the systemic understanding and showing the role of the affective dimension in the transactional learning.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Chi Chiu Cheang, Wing-Mui Winnie So, Ying Zhan and Kwok Ho Tsoi

This paper aims to explore stakeholder perspectives of the role of a campus eco-garden in education for sustainability (EfS). It will combine the perspectives to highlight…

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7923

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore stakeholder perspectives of the role of a campus eco-garden in education for sustainability (EfS). It will combine the perspectives to highlight a powerful learning environment (PLE) for university students to realize the concept of EfS.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted to reveal stakeholder understandings of a campus eco-garden, as well as its associated expectations of learning activities and education outcomes. Three stakeholder groups were interviewed; designers, educators and environmental and non-environmental subject-related students.

Findings

All three stakeholder groups expected cognitive learning of EfS to be enhanced by the eco-garden. The use of affective learning was not strongly expected by the stakeholders. Psychomotor learning was believed to be the most difficult to realize. To fulfill the potential of the eco-garden in EfS, all stakeholders suggested learning activities and roles for both students and teachers. The combined perspectives of the stakeholders helped to visualize a PLE to aid EfS.

Practical implications

This study underlines the importance of effective communication of expectations between stakeholders. It underlines the importance of integrating educational activities with the eco-garden as a PLE, highlighting the roles of teachers and students. It also sheds light on the importance of introducing a cultural component to the EfS program.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply the PLE theory to enhance EfS with the aid of infrastructure. Both users and designers reveal their views on the planning of the campus eco-garden, especially in its educational function. The study is possibly the first to reveal the differences in expectations between designers and other stakeholder groups (teachers and students) using Könings et al.’s (2005) combination-of-perspectives model.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

David R. Glerum and Timothy A. Judge

This paper aims to apply training evaluation to employability development, providing a systematic process to assess employability development programs' effectiveness under…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply training evaluation to employability development, providing a systematic process to assess employability development programs' effectiveness under the framework of employability capital resources (Peeters et al., 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors demonstrate the training evaluation process within an employability development program for US secondary school students. This process included providing validation evidence for measures of evaluation criteria across multiple samples of secondary school students and testing the effectiveness of the program utilizing a quasi-experimental design.

Findings

The authors systematically found support for the intervention's effects on training criteria (i.e. reactions, learning, behavior, results) and demonstrated the utility for training evaluation's application to employability development. The findings illustrate how a training evaluation approach can provide holistic evidence that an employability development program achieved its intended outcomes.

Originality/value

Employability is a new and burgeoning topic – however, employability development varies in how it is conceptualized, evaluated and assessed. By applying training evaluation approaches, employability development can be assessed within a unifying framework and better integrated within the Human Resource Management literature.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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