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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Mohammad Faraz Naim and Usha Lenka

The present study aims to explore knowledge sharing to evoke affective commitment of Gen Y employees through competency development.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to explore knowledge sharing to evoke affective commitment of Gen Y employees through competency development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses cross-sectional survey to collect primary data. A questionnaire is developed based on extensive review of literature. A sample was obtained from Gen Y employees (born between 1980 and 2000) working in software organizations in India. In total, 582 completely filled, usable questionnaires were obtained.

Findings

Results indicate that knowledge sharing has a positive effect on competency development of Gen Y employees, which in turn, positively predicts affective commitment. Furthermore, this would result in the enhancement of employee competencies and eventually, the generation of affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to the software development professionals working in Indian organizations Therefore, researchers should test the research model further in other industries preferably in a different country.

Practical implications

The more knowledge assets are shared in the organization, the higher the enhancement of employee competencies will become. To evoke emotional attachment of Gen Y employees, an organization must implement learning and development interventions

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge management literature, particularly knowledge sharing by exploring its possible linkage with employee attitudinal outcomes through empirical data. This also happens to be an empirical study to investigate Gen Y employees’ commitment in Indian context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Pattanee Susomrith, Alan Coetzer and Emmanuel Ampofo

This paper aims to examine whether participation in training and development (T&D) events is associated with employees’ affective commitment and propensity to enact…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether participation in training and development (T&D) events is associated with employees’ affective commitment and propensity to enact innovative behaviours in small professional services firms. The study also investigates associations between both attitudes towards T&D and policy and practice supportive of T&D and levels of participation in T&D events.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 203 employees in small professional services firms employing 50 or fewer staff were analysed using regression analysis and PROCESS macro.

Findings

Only policy and practice supportive of T&D was associated with participation levels. Participation in T&D events was positively related to affective commitment. Furthermore, employees who participated in more T&D events were more likely to enact innovative behaviours, while affective commitment mediated the positive relationship between number of T&D events attended and innovative behaviours. Contrary to expectations, neither participation in just training nor participation in just development was associated with either attitudes or behaviours.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for small firms which tend to rely on wholly work-based experiences for the development of employees’ knowledge and skills. Such an approach to learning for work may inadvertently shape a workforce that lacks commitment to the organisation and that has a diminished capacity for innovative behaviours.

Originality/value

There is limited research on how T&D affects attitudes and behaviours in small firms. Large and small firms are fundamentally different, thus findings from studies in large firms may not extend to small firms.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Jörg Hruby, Rodrigo Jorge de Melo, Eyden Samunderu and Jonathan Hartel

Global Mindset (GM) is a multifaceted construct that has received broad interest among practitioners and academics. It is a fragmented construct at this point in time, due…

Abstract

Global Mindset (GM) is a multifaceted construct that has received broad interest among practitioners and academics. It is a fragmented construct at this point in time, due to definitional overlap with other constructs such as global leadership and cultural intelligence. This overlap has created complexity for research that attempts to understand GM in isolation. Lack of clear boundaries in defining and conceptualizing this construct challenges researchers who are attempting to capture fully what constitutes GM. Our work seeks to better understand and explain what underlines the individual GM construct and how does this impact the development of global competencies in individual managers.

We systematically review and analyze the individual GM literature thematically to provide an overview of the extant research from a broad array of scholarly sources dating from 1994 to 2017. Our work offers a thematic analysis that provides a visual guide to GM by tracking the corpus of individual-level GM studies. We categorize the research according to its theoretical groundings and basic concepts and proceed review how GM has been operationalized at the individual level and measured. Next, we integrate major dimensions in the GM research and propose a framework to enhance understanding of the phenomenon. Finally, we discuss the implications of our review for the development of GM for practitioners, coaches and trainers.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-297-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Renae D. Mayes, Colette T. Dollarhide, Bowen Marshall and Alexis Rae

The purpose of this paper is to examine how multicultural counseling students expressed their understandings about themselves and others in relation to diversity. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how multicultural counseling students expressed their understandings about themselves and others in relation to diversity. The authors wanted to know how cognitive development, affective development, and sense of self-evolved during a multicultural counseling class to examine all aspects of growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Themes from a phenomenological qualitative analysis of journals from a multicultural counseling class suggest that students struggle with cognitive challenges (dealing with ambiguity, internalizing multicultural concepts, and self- and other-acceptance) and affective challenges (anger, guilt, and fear) in attaining multicultural growth.

Findings

This expanded view of multicultural growth that includes affective challenges can fill a prior gap in understanding how multicultural learning occurs.

Research limitations/implications

Implications are explored for counselor educators and supervisors.

Originality/value

Recent use of journals to provide empirical insights into student growth include a study by Cohen et al. (2015), who used qualitative analyses of journal contents to examine growth in student attitudes toward geriatric clients, death, and dying. Knowing that student journals can provide insights into changing multicultural attitudes, and that qualitative methodology can provide tools for analysis, the authors decided that it might be possible to better understand multicultural growth by studying the journals written in a multicultural counseling class.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Gia Nardini and Richard J. Lutz

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between mental simulation and affective misforecasting of hedonic consumption experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between mental simulation and affective misforecasting of hedonic consumption experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a series of lab and field studies that manipulate mental simulation and experience type (ordinary versus extraordinary) and measure affective misforecasting and mindfulness. Data were analyzed using a combination of ANOVA and PROCESS.

Findings

Mental simulation before an experience causes negative affective misforecasting to occur for extraordinary experiences but not ordinary experiences. The authors further show that mindfulness mediates the effect of mental simulation on affective misforecasting.

Practical implications

The findings provide insight into how thinking about experiences before consumption affects consumers’ actual engagement with the experience. This paper suggests that, by encouraging consumers to mentally simulate their experiences before consumption, marketers may cause consumers to miss out on enjoying their experiences to the fullest. Instead, marketers may want to maintain some mystique by encouraging consumers to “come see for themselves”.

Originality/value

The authors demonstrate a novel cause of affective misforecasting: mental simulation before the experience and provide initial evidence in support of a novel psychological process explanation (i.e. mindfulness) for the effect of mental simulation on affective misforecasting.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Richard N. Ottaway

The cultural differences between British and American managersobserved while teaching applied psychology to classes of bothnationalities are discussed. Each group was…

Abstract

The cultural differences between British and American managers observed while teaching applied psychology to classes of both nationalities are discussed. Each group was taught materials with a dominant cognitive and affective focus in university and management development courses. Two categories of differences are identified: personal perspectives and educational philosophy. Under personal perspectives, the influence of the future orientation of the Americans and the past orientation of the British are considered. These differences may account for the desire of subjective learning experiences on the part of the Americans and objective experiences for the British. The past and future orientation may also account for the interest in Freudian theories applied to management education in Britain and the humanistic school in America. It is concluded that the educational philosophies are very different, with the Americans having a very utilitarian view of education, dating back to the Land Grant colleges and the acceptance of part‐time students.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 January 2012

Teresa Di Filippo, Lucia Parisi and Michele Roccella

Impairment of intelligence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients was described by Duchenne de Boulogne himself in 1868. Further studies report intelligence…

Abstract

Impairment of intelligence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients was described by Duchenne de Boulogne himself in 1868. Further studies report intelligence disorders with mayor impairment of memory. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of affective and personality disorders in a group of children affected by DMD. Twenty six male DMD patients, mean age eleven and four months years old, were assessed for their affective and personality disorder. Only eight subjects had a total IQ below average with major difficulties in verbal and visual-spatial memory, comprehension, arithmetic and vocabulary. All the subjects presented some disorders: tendency to marginalization and isolation, self-depreciation, sense of insecurity, hypochondriac thoughts and marked state of anxiety. These disorders are often a dynamic prolongation of a psychological process which starts when the diagnosis is made and continues, in a slow and latent fashion, throughout the evolution of the disease.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Donald P. Roy and T. Bettina Cornwell

Recent research into consumer responses to sponsorships has examined the role of sponsor‐event fit on cognitive and affective responses. However, influences on…

Abstract

Recent research into consumer responses to sponsorships has examined the role of sponsor‐event fit on cognitive and affective responses. However, influences on sponsor‐event fit have received little consideration. In this study, a sponsor’s brand equity is evaluated as a facilitator of sponsor‐event fit. Six sponsors (three high equity/three low equity) were paired with six events. Results of hypothesis testing indicated that sponsors with high brand equity were perceived as more congruent sponsors than sponsors with low brand equity even though the events sponsored were identical. Also, a positive relationship was found between sponsor‐event congruence and favorable attitudes toward the sponsor. Results of this study suggest that consumers’ attitudes toward sponsors are comprised of associations other than the sponsor‐event association. While lesser known brands can use sponsorship as a brand‐building vehicle, they may not attain the same level of results as their high equity counterparts.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Ana Moreira, Francisco Cesário, Maria José Chambel and Filipa Castanheira

This study aims to explore the serial mediation effect of perceived internal employability and affective commitment in the relationship between the organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the serial mediation effect of perceived internal employability and affective commitment in the relationship between the organisational practices of competences development and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology was quantitative and is based on a survey with a sample of 313 participants, all of whom were employed in several organisations located in Portugal.

Findings

A significant and negative effect of organisational practices of competences development, perceived internal employability and affective commitment on turnover intentions was verified. A total serial mediation effect was also found from perceived internal employability and affective commitment in the relationship between organisational practices of competences development (i.e., training, individualised support and functional rotation) and turnover intentions.

Practical implications

These practices should be developed by leaders of organisations in order that employees feel that the organisation is investing in their development, which can lead to an increase in their emotional attachment towards the organisation and consequently increase their desire to stay in the organisation.

Originality/value

This study makes two important contributions. First, it confirms the existence of a significant and negative relationship between perceived internal employability and turnover intentions. Second, it proves the existence of a total serial mediation effect of perceived internal employability and affective commitment in the relationship between organisational practices of competences development and turnover intentions.

Details

European Journal of Management Studies, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2183-4172

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Mary Bambacas

This study aims to investigate how the relationship between two aspects of career management – the practice of career development activities by the organization…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the relationship between two aspects of career management – the practice of career development activities by the organization (organizational career development) and career development activities by the individual (career self‐management), and affective and normative commitment levels, are influenced by the value that employees place on the career development offerings of their organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidence was drawn from 196 manager members of the Australian Institute of Management. Hierarchical moderated regression analysis was used to test the hypothesized relationships of the model.

Findings

Levels of affective and normative commitment improved when organizations provided continuous learning to managers. This was the case, for career management both by the individual, and by the organization. In particular, normative commitment was strongest for those who valued the continuous learning they received while managing their own careers. For the group of managers who experienced organizational career development the opposite was the case. Continuous learning provided by the organization improved their levels of affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Organizations must understand the needs of their staff so that they can provide career management practices that are valued and can enhance their levels of affective and normative commitment.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of organizations paying attention to what individuals value so that they may fit with the organization and enhance their commitment to it. It also draws attention to career self‐management as a positive organizational initiative.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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