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1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Miguel Ángel Sastre Castillo and Ignacio Danvila Del Valle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI), organizational affective commitment (AC), and performance at low-skilled…

1298

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI), organizational affective commitment (AC), and performance at low-skilled back office positions.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 397 participants in low-skilled back office positions from a service company completed a questionnaire assessing EI, AC, and performance. The authors used multiple regression models for testing whether higher levels of EI and AC predicted better performance. Additionally, they tested to see whether EI and AC were positively related.

Findings

The results showed that workers in low-skilled back office positions with higher EI and AC had better performance. In this sense, intrapersonal skills and mood management were the dimensions of EI with the highest predictive power. Also, EI and AC were positively related, with intrapersonal skills and adaptability being the dimensions of EI most closely associated with AC. Finally, the predictive power on performance was increased when EI and AC were considered simultaneously.

Originality/value

Traditionally, the involvement of EI and other personal dimensions in increasing organizational commitment and better work performance has been studied in high-skilled and executive positions, as well as in front office low-skilled positions. However, there is little empirical evidence regarding the simultaneous influence of EI and AC on performance in low-skilled back office positions. This gap prompted this research, which suggests that the investment of organizational resources is mandatory for improving EI and, hence, organizational commitment and work performance in these employees.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Keith Yong Ngee Ng

Prevailing corporate culture coupled with affective trust in co-workers and affective organizational commitment may promote or hinder the tendency for people to share…

Abstract

Purpose

Prevailing corporate culture coupled with affective trust in co-workers and affective organizational commitment may promote or hinder the tendency for people to share knowledge. This study aims to determine whether knowledge-sharing tendency varies from one form of organizational culture to another by examining the concurrent mediation of affective trust in co-workers and affective organizational commitment and provide insights for appropriate knowledge-sharing initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Adult learners (N = 408) enrolled in the MBA and MSc postgraduate programs at five private universities in Singapore participated in a two-part self-administered anonymous survey. Data were analyzed with SmartPLS partial-least squares structural equation modeling using a two-stage analytical technique that examined the measurement and structural models.

Findings

The concurrent effects of affective trust in co-workers and affective organizational commitment complementarily mediated the relationship of organizational culture on the knowledge-sharing tendency for adhocracy, clan and market cultures but fully mediated for hierarchy culture.

Practical implications

This study provides insights for managers to understand the characteristics of their organizational culture and choose appropriate practices for improving knowledge-sharing tendency among its employees.

Originality/value

A model is established to determine the type of organizational culture that facilitates knowledge-sharing tendency. It offers new theoretical insights into how and why affective trust in co-workers and affective organizational commitment impact the relationship of organizational culture on knowledge-sharing tendency. Understanding these relationships can provide valuable insights into various strategies for different organizational cultures to increase employees’ knowledge-sharing tendency.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Selin Metin Camgöz and Pinar Bayhan Karapinar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between a secure attachment style and affective commitment (AC) through the mediating roles of affective and…

1168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between a secure attachment style and affective commitment (AC) through the mediating roles of affective and cognitive trust in a direct supervisor.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using the questionnaire answers of 357 private sector employees in various occupations. The statistical analysis was based on structural equation modeling. A multiple mediation model enabled us to investigate the specific indirect effects of each mediator.

Findings

Results based on a model comparison showed that the employees’ affective trust in their supervisor fully mediated the relationship between a secure attachment style and AC. However, cognitive trust had no significant mediating effect on relationships between a secure attachment style and AC.

Practical implications

Trust in supervisors should be monitored and supported during developmental interventions. Understanding the power of affective and cognitive trust in predicting attitudes can help shape more effective interventions to influence positive work attitudes, including AC.

Originality/value

The study sheds new light on the literature by linking individual attachment to organizational attachment as the mediating role of two forms of trust in a supervisor.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Neuza Ribeiro, Daniel Gomes and Shaji Kurian

This study aims to examine the relationship between authentic leadership (AL), affective commitment and individual performance. More specifically, this study aims to…

1858

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between authentic leadership (AL), affective commitment and individual performance. More specifically, this study aims to understand how AL influences employees’ affective commitment, how AL influences individual performance, how affective commitment influences individual performance and how affective commitment mediates the relationship between AL and individual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 212 Portuguese employees participated in this study. A quantitative methodology was used. Baron and Kenny’s linear regression method and Sobel test were used to test the mediation relationship.

Findings

The results reveal that affective commitment mediates the relationship between AL and employees’ performance. In others words, leaders’ authenticity promotes employees’ affective commitment, which, in turn, increases their individual performance.

Practical implications

This research has practical implications for human resource management in organizations, particularly in selection processes and training of leaders and managers. Practitioners looking to increase employee commitment and performance can do so by augmenting the AL.

Originality/value

This study enriches the knowledge about the relevance of emerging areas such as AL theory and responds to the need to understand underlying mechanisms linking AL with workers’ commitment and performance (i.e. testing the construct’s nomological network).

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Ana Carolina de Aguiar Rodrigues, Antonio Virgílio Bittencourt Bastos, Daniela Campos Bahia Moscon and Giselle Cavalcante Queiroz

Is it possible to consider organizational entrenchment (OE) and continued commitment (CC) as the same phenomenon? Are there enough differences between CC and affective

Abstract

Purpose

Is it possible to consider organizational entrenchment (OE) and continued commitment (CC) as the same phenomenon? Are there enough differences between CC and affective commitment (AC) to defend that they cannot be part of the same construct? The objective of this study was to examine the convergence of validated measures between OE and CC and their discrimination to AC. The authors’ aim was to compare two models of antecedents and their consequences: the model that includes OE and AC, and the one that includes CC and AC.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 1,648 respondents (the majority lived in the Northeast region of Brazil, worked in private services companies, were female, single, under 35 years old, had, at least, begun college studies and received up to five times the minimum wage). A six-point Likert scale was used in this study. To measure OE, CC and AC, the authors used reduced versions of validated measures. To test the hypotheses, first, the authors used Pearson's correlation analysis and then, structural equation modeling, comparing two models of antecedents and consequences (one including OE and AC, and the other, including CC and AC).

Findings

As expected, affective commitment had a positive impact on the desired behavior (intention for commitment, defense, staying), whereas entrenchment and continuance commitment had a negative or non-significant impact on these behaviors. Results show the existence of a conceptual and empirical overlap between organizational entrenchment and continuance commitment and indicate that the continuance dimension is not part of commitment but rather part of organizational entrenchment.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this is a cross-sectional study sets a limitation on the results, for not allowing greater understanding of the dynamics and the causal direction of relationships. Additionally, it follows the trend of studies in the organizational behavior field of utilizing self-reported data, which results in problems related to perceptual bias (Morrow, 2011).

Practical implications

The practical implications of this study regard a greater clarification on which behaviors are expected from either committed and entrenched workers, and which drivers may lead to each of these bonds. Therefore, a better understanding of the phenomenon contributes to the training of managers and to the design of organizational policies and practices.

Social implications

The clarity of bonds also allows its application to different contexts beyond business organizations, as a step to reach better understanding of commitment and entrenchment in different settings, economical and national realities.

Originality/value

It is expected that these findings add a higher precision to the research on commitment, thus contributing to the validity of the measures. Given these results and confirmation that OE and CC represent the same bond, it is considered appropriate to designate this type of bond simply as OE. Additionally, the results of this study represent a further argument in favor of prioritizing the AC than CC in research and in management of organizational commitment.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Ayşe Kuruüzüm, Emre Ipekçi Çetin and Sezgin Irmak

This paper aims to determine the structural relationships between job involvement, job satisfaction, and three dimensions of organizational commitment (i.e. affective

4793

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the structural relationships between job involvement, job satisfaction, and three dimensions of organizational commitment (i.e. affective commitment, normative commitment, and continuance commitment) in the Turkish hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted among the full‐time employees of five‐star hotels in the Antalya region, which is an important tourism destination especially for Europeans and Russians in Turkey.

Findings

The research model, which was structured by taking related literature as the base, was revised and a new path model was gathered as a result of this study. Results showed that job involvement, affective commitment, and normative commitment increase job satisfaction, and job involvement affects affective and normative commitment.

Practical implications

Job involvement is more stable than organizational commitment, and it might be difficult to increase job involvement. Therefore, attempts to build organizational commitment (especially affective commitment) become important in increasing job satisfaction of the employees in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

The results of the present study revealed that affective commitment and normative commitment were related to job involvement and job satisfaction but continuance commitment was not related to these concepts in the hospitality industry.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Amna Yousaf, Huadong Yang and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to examine underlying linkages between employees’ intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and their task/contextual performance in a Pakistani health…

7306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine underlying linkages between employees’ intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and their task/contextual performance in a Pakistani health care and educational context. Employees’ affective occupational and organizational commitments were proposed as mediators to explain these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 181 doctors from a Pakistani hospital and 135 academics from a Pakistani university and analyzed using Baron and Kenney (1986) approach and Preacher and Hayes (2008) bootstrapping approach for testing multiple mediators simultaneously.

Findings

As expected, intrinsic motivation is related to task performance (TP) and this relationship is mediated by affective occupational commitment. Extrinsic motivation is related both to TP and contextual performance (CP) and these relationships are mediated by affective organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Research has implications both for practitioners and academicians. The results highlight how different motivational orientations can produce different results and managers need to understand the different needs of employees while devising their human resource strategies. Employees can differ in their motivational orientations depending on their level of need, and can accordingly differ in their subsequent attitudes, performance and behaviors. Employees also need to choose jobs carefully after evaluating their motivational orientations.

Originality/value

The current study recognizes the multi-dimensional nature of motivation and differentiates the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations of employees by establishing the unique linkages between these orientations and employee task and CP. The study also examines differential role of two foci of employee commitment in analyzing the main effects.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Sharmila Jayasingam, Maggie Mei Kei Chong and Raida Abu Bakar

Organizations send their employees for international assignments so as to develop their international working experiences, their global knowledge and skills. These…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations send their employees for international assignments so as to develop their international working experiences, their global knowledge and skills. These employees are then expected to return to their home countries (hereof known as repatriates) to share their newly gained knowledge or skills with their colleagues. This practice would benefit the organization's performance to some extent. Nonetheless, past literature had pointed out that many of such repatriates tend to leave their respective organizations as a result of not being able to fully utilize their newly acquired knowledge and skills, which led them to perceive that they were overqualified. This occurrence could lead to a loss of valuable knowledge for their organization. Aiming to address this issue at hand, the current study focuses on examining of the antecedents that could influence these repatriates' knowledge sharing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a research framework which was developed from three aspects of interest–perceived overqualification, affective commitment and the moderating effect of repatriation support practices on knowledge sharing behaviour of repatriates. Structural model analysis was carried out to assess 152 useable data which were collected from returning corporate repatriates in Malaysia. The SmartPLS 3.0 software was applied.

Findings

Repatriates with highly perceived overqualifications tend to exhibit low affective commitment. The impact of their perceived overqualification on knowledge sharing behaviour was fully mediated by their affective commitment. Repatriation support practice was found to strengthen the positive relationship between affective commitment and knowledge sharing behaviour.

Originality/value

The use of the relative deprivation theory showed that the outcome derived from this study could serve as an insight for organizations to understand how those repatriates' perception of overqualification influences their level of affective commitment, and subsequently, the extent to which they share knowledge upon returning.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Sweta Srivastava Malla and Sanjay Malla

The purpose of this paper is to identify select antecedents for affective commitment (AC) and whether organizational trust (OT) mediates the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify select antecedents for affective commitment (AC) and whether organizational trust (OT) mediates the relationship between dimensions of organizational justice (OJ) and AC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey-based design, data were collected from employees across industry verticals who were working in various organizations and participated in an executive management program at an Indian management institute. Analysis was carried out using a partial least square-based package of ADANCO 2.2.1.

Findings

In line with cross-cultural research, the results indicated that distributive and informational justice contribute toward employees' AC. In addition, the findings confirmed that OT mediates the justice-AC relationship for distributive, interpersonal and informational justice. The role of job satisfaction (JS) as an important antecedent was also identified.

Practical implications

The evidence-based findings, as represented in importance–performance map analysis (IPMA), will help the organizational leaders understand the factors responsible for employees' AC. Leaders will appreciate the important role played by justice, fairness and OT in enhancing commitment. The importance of JS was also highlighted.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering study to provide empirical evidence of the moderating effect of trust on OJ and the AC relationship. It is also one of the first to consider all of the four dimensions of OJ as possible antecedents for AC in a non-Western context.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Gordon Fullerton

Allen and Meyer’s (1990) three component model of organizational commitment is now well accepted in the study of consumer–service provider relationships (Keiningham et al.

Abstract

Purpose

Allen and Meyer’s (1990) three component model of organizational commitment is now well accepted in the study of consumer–service provider relationships (Keiningham et al., 2015). Commitment profiling is a “person-centered approach” to commitment (Meyer et al., 2012) which examines groups of individuals who share similar commitment mindsets. The purpose of this paper is to apply commitment profile methodology to the analysis of customer–firm relationships in the context of financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

This method was applied with customer data collected as part of a nation-wide panel study of consumer financial service relationships in Canada. In total, 428 banking customers participated in this study.

Findings

This study identified five distinct bank customer commitment profiles (fully committed, affective commitment dominant, continuance commitment dominant, moderately committed and uncommitted) that varied in both size and behaviors and intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploration of commitment profiling as a technique to understand the ways in which consumers differ in terms of their commitment mindsets and behavior. It has application to a wide range of service relationships beyond financial services.

Practical implications

This has applications for market segmentation on the basis of customer commitment mindsets in many service sectors, but banking in particular. Since financial institutions have adopted various techniques to measure customer lifetime value (CLV), it would be appropriate to understand how various commitment profiles (segments) are linked to CLV.

Originality/value

While commitment profiling is a well-developed approach in understanding the nature of the firm–employee employment relationships, this is an early and exploratory attempt at applying this method in the context of a customer–financial service provider marketing relationship. This is a novel way of understanding bank customer segments in terms of their felt commitment to the financial institution with which they do business.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000