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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Mark Phillips

Considers how far the aerospace industry has travelled on the long journey towards lean and agile manufacturing. Starts by comparing the industry with a well‐established…

Abstract

Considers how far the aerospace industry has travelled on the long journey towards lean and agile manufacturing. Starts by comparing the industry with a well‐established model of a lean and in some cases agile manufacturing system already well established in the automotive manufacturing industry. Makes some attempts to overcome the difference in output volume of the two industries. Asks whether lean manufacturing can be applied to the aerospace industry. Draws on observations made both by academics and during visits to aerospace supply companies. Evidence is put forward as to deployment of lean practices in the industry and why lean manufacturing must be deployed throughout the industry. Focuses on the tentative steps towards the first phases of agile manufacturing, through Lean production, in an industry that produces a high technology leading‐edge product using outdated manufacturing systems.

Details

International Journal of Agile Management Systems, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1465-4652

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Jonathan Brodeur, Robert Pellerin and Isabelle Deschamps

This paper aims to propose a collaborative approach model developed based on observations of two aerospace manufacturing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) pursuing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a collaborative approach model developed based on observations of two aerospace manufacturing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) pursuing their digital transformation toward Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focuses on two manufacturing SMEs in North America, and data were collected using longitudinal case study and research intervention method. Data collection was performed through observation and intervention within the collaborative projects over 18 months.

Findings

A model of a collaborative approach to digital transformation (CADT) for manufacturing SMEs was produced. Based on the study findings, the collaboration manifests itself at various stages of the transformation projects, such as the business needs alignment, project portfolio creation, technology solution selection and post-mortem phase.

Research limitations/implications

Research using the case study method has a limitation in the generalization of the model. The CADT model generated in this study might be specific to the aerospace manufacturing industry and collaboration patterns between manufacturing SMEs. The results could vary in different contexts.

Practical implications

The proposed CADT model is particularly relevant for manufacturing SMEs' managers and consultants working on digital transformation projects. By adopting this approach, they could better plan and guide their collaboration approach during their Industry 4.0 transformation.

Originality/value

This research provides a new perspective to digital transformation approaches in the aerospace industry. It can be integrated into other research findings to formulate a more integrated and comprehensive CADT model in industries where SMEs are significant players.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Sami Farooq and Chris O'Brien

The purpose of this paper is to present result obtained from a developed technology selection framework and provide a detailed insight into the risk calculations and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present result obtained from a developed technology selection framework and provide a detailed insight into the risk calculations and their implications in manufacturing technology selection process.

Design/methodology/approach

The results illustrated in the paper are the outcome of an action research study that was conducted in an aerospace company.

Findings

The paper highlights the role of risk calculations in manufacturing technology selection process by elaborating the contribution of risk associated with manufacturing technology alternatives in the shape of opportunities and threats in different decision‐making environments.

Practical implications

The research quantifies the risk associated with different available manufacturing technology alternatives. This quantification of risk crystallises the process of technology selection decision making and supports an industrial manager in achieving objective and comprehensive decisions regarding selection of a manufacturing technology.

Originality/value

The paper explains the process of risk calculation in manufacturing technology selection by dividing the decision‐making environment into manufacturing and supply chain environment. The evaluation of a manufacturing technology considering supply chain opportunities and threats provides a broader perspective to the technology evaluation process. The inclusion of supply chain dimension in technology selection process facilitates an organisation to select a manufacturing technology not only according to its own requirements, but also according to the interest of its constituent supply chain.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Kamal Sehdev, Ip‐Shing Fan, Stephen Cooper and Gareth Williams

Design for manufacture (DFM) is accepted as an important tool toimprove manufacturing competitiveness. Reports on the results of thefirst phase of a study conducted by…

Abstract

Design for manufacture (DFM) is accepted as an important tool to improve manufacturing competitiveness. Reports on the results of the first phase of a study conducted by Cranfield University to establish the user requirements for “design for manufacture” within a complex design and manufacture supply chain.

Details

World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Mahyar Khorasani, AmirHossein Ghasemi, Bernard Rolfe and Ian Gibson

Additive manufacturing (AM) offers potential solutions when conventional manufacturing reaches its technological limits. These include a high degree of design freedom…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing (AM) offers potential solutions when conventional manufacturing reaches its technological limits. These include a high degree of design freedom, lightweight design, functional integration and rapid prototyping. In this paper, the authors show how AM can be implemented not only for prototyping but also production using different optimization approaches in design including topology optimization, support optimization and selection of part orientation and part consolidation. This paper aims to present how AM can reduce the production cost of complex components such as jet engine air manifold by optimizing the design. This case study also identifies a detailed feasibility analysis of the cost model for an air manifold of an Airbus jet engine using various strategies, such as computer numerical control machining, printing with standard support structures and support optimization.

Design/methodology/approach

Parameters that affect the production price of the air manifold such as machining, printing (process), feedstock, labor and post-processing costs were calculated and compared to find the best manufacturing strategy.

Findings

Results showed that AM can solve a range of problems and improve production by customization, rapid prototyping and geometrical freedom. This case study showed that 49%–58% of the cost is related to pre- and post-processing when using laser-based powder bed fusion to produce the air manifold. However, the cost of pre- and post-processing when using machining is 32%–35% of the total production costs. The results of this research can assist successful enterprises, such as aerospace, automotive and medical, in successfully turning toward AM technology.

Originality/value

Important factors such as validity, feasibility and limitations, pre-processing and monitoring, are discussed to show how a process chain can be controlled and run efficiently. Reproducibility of the process chain is debated to ensure the quality of mass production lines. Post-processing and qualification of the AM parts are also discussed to show how to satisfy the demands on standards (for surface quality and dimensional accuracy), safety, quality and certification. The original contribution of this paper is identifying the main production costs of complex components using both conventional and AM.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Pieter Johannes Theron Conradie, Dimitri Dimitrov, Gert Adriaan Oosthuizen, Philip Hugo and Mike Saxer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the combination of selective laser melting (SLM) and 5-axis CNC milling to produce parts from titanium powder. The aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the combination of selective laser melting (SLM) and 5-axis CNC milling to produce parts from titanium powder. The aim is to achieve a more resource-efficient manufacturing process by reducing material wastage and machining time, while adhering to quality requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

A benchmark titanium aerospace component is manufactured with two different approaches using subtractive and additive manufacturing technologies. The first component is produced from a solid billet using only 5-axis CNC milling. The second component is grown from powder using SLM to produce a net-shaped part of which the final shape and part accuracy are achieved through 5-axis CNC milling. The potential saving of material and machining time of the process combination is evaluated by comparing it to the conventional purely CNC approach. The form accuracy, surface finish, mechanical properties and tool wear for the two processes are also compared.

Findings

The results show that the process combination can be used to produce Ti components that adhere to aerospace standards. With the process combination, a material saving of 87 per cent was achieved along with a reduction of 21 per cent in machining time. Further improvements are possible using optimized SLM build and machining strategies.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of a resource efficiency assessment on the combination of SLM and 5-axis CNC milling for the titanium alloy, Ti6Al4V. It is expected that this process combination can make a significant contribution towards reducing material wastage and machining time for aerospace applications.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Ngoc Anh Vu, Than Lin, Abdulaziz Azamatov, Tun Lwin and Jae‐Woo Lee

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated rotorcraft design and virtual manufacturing framework. The framework consists of two major sub‐frameworks which are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated rotorcraft design and virtual manufacturing framework. The framework consists of two major sub‐frameworks which are e‐design and virtual manufacturing frameworks. This paper aims to describe the process of generating a specific framework for helicopter design and manufacturing in general, and a method for main rotor blade design.

Design/methodology/approach

The e‐design process integrates a pre‐conceptual, conceptual and preliminary design phases and includes many high accuracy physics‐based analysis tools and in‐house codes. The development of analysis programs and integration of flow data are discussed under the e‐design process. The virtual manufacturing process discusses physical three‐dimensional (3D) prototypes using rapid prototyping, virtual process simulation model development using Delmia Quest, virtual machine tool simulation and process‐based cost model. Vehicle geometry is modelled parametrically in computer‐aided 3D interactive application (CATIA) V5 to enable integration between the e‐design and virtual manufacturing processes, and then saved in Enovia SmartTeam which is commercial software for product data management (PDM). Data saved in Enovia SmartTeam are used as a database for the virtual manufacturing process.

Findings

The integration framework was constructed by using Model Center software. A multi‐disciplinary design optimization loop for rotor blade considering manufacturing factors is discussed to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the framework.

Practical implications

The manufacturing (practical factors) could be considered at an early stage of the rotor blades design.

Originality/value

The gap between theoretical (engineering design: aerodynamic, structural, dynamic, design, etc.) and practical aspects (manufacturing) is bridged through integrated product/process development framework. The modern concurrent engineering approach is addressed for helicopter rotor blade design throughout the case study.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 83 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Than Lin, Jae‐Woo Lee and Tun Lwin

The purpose of this research is to develop an integrated model for composite rotor blade manufacturing cost estimates at the conceptual design stage. The integrated model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop an integrated model for composite rotor blade manufacturing cost estimates at the conceptual design stage. The integrated model seeks to provide a rapid and dynamic feedback based on evaluating the manufacturing cost estimate for a new product design at the conceptual design stage. This paper describes the automated estimating process for design to manufacturing cost of composite rotor blade.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated approach is implemented for evaluating the manufacturing cost estimates. The paper develops each module of the computer‐aided parametric model generation, time estimation models for composite manufacturing processes and decision support system. Finally, process flow data integration is done for all the modules. An example for a complicated geometric rotor blade is shown in this research paper. The results are compared in different design parameters and discussed.

Findings

The data integration for this approach was built by using ModelCenter® software. It is easier and more robust to apply than the other proposed methods. The selection of design, material and manufacturing parameters is achieved by integrated model within a short period of time.

Practical implications

This paper provides an integrated concurrent approach for manufacturing cost evaluation of composite rotor blade. Manufacturing factors could be considered at the early stage of product development phase.

Originality/value

This paper suggests an effective and efficient way of evaluating the manufacturing cost at the conceptual stage of the design process. The concurrent engineering and integrated product process development approaches were addressed.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Philip Webb, Seemal Asif, Susanne Hogger, Thomas Kosche and Paul Kiernan

– This paper aims to describe a new methodology for controlling highly flexible automated manufacturing cells for use in aerospace manufacturing and repair.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a new methodology for controlling highly flexible automated manufacturing cells for use in aerospace manufacturing and repair.

Design/methodology/approach

The design methodology and rational of the FLEXA control architecture are described along with it implementation and testing.

Findings

The trials completed so far show that the level of flexibility required can be achieved both at factory, or enterprise level, and at shop floor level.

Practical implications

This work has significant practical implications through its direct applicability for aerospace and other automated manufacturing processes.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the truly flexible nature of the control system described and its ability to mimic traditional cell control architectures but be expanded through the use of virtual Programmable Logic Controller to control any number of cells without the need for significant extra hardware.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology: An International Journal, vol. 87 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

AEM will be exhibiting in Hall 4, Stand G1. The exhibit will illustrate AEM's comprehensive range of accessory repair and overhaul services for electrical, hydraulic…

Abstract

AEM will be exhibiting in Hall 4, Stand G1. The exhibit will illustrate AEM's comprehensive range of accessory repair and overhaul services for electrical, hydraulic, avionic and safety equipment. Farnborough will also be used as the official launch of AEM's Boeing 737 Landing Gear Total Support Pro‐gramme, which encompasses a complete exchange and overhaul service. Copies of Aviation Accessory News will be available on the stand.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 64 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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