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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 76 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Kalyan Ghosh, Patricia Garcia and Ernest Galgoci

Reports results from studies conducted on a polyfunctional amine adduct epoxy curing agent (EPI‐CURE DPC‐3293) as a means to design low temperature cure coatings. Through…

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Reports results from studies conducted on a polyfunctional amine adduct epoxy curing agent (EPI‐CURE DPC‐3293) as a means to design low temperature cure coatings. Through the judicious choice of epoxide resins and amine‐functional curing agents, relatively fast reaction rates and resistance to moisture and humidity are maintained under low‐temperature cure conditions, and that is evidenced by a good balance of performance properties of coating films. We have used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the extent of reaction as well as the glass transition temperatures (Tg). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to predict the barrier properties of coating films. These results are compared with epoxide resins cured with a phenalkamine curing agent to illustrate some of the unique advantages of using multifunctional amine adduct curing agents for the curing of epoxide resins under sub‐ambient cure conditions for a multitude of end‐use applications.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Chris J.E. Smith

The aerospace industry relies heavily on protective treatments and processes to ensure that the structural integrity of an aircraft is not degraded in service as a result…

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The aerospace industry relies heavily on protective treatments and processes to ensure that the structural integrity of an aircraft is not degraded in service as a result of operating under harsh corrosive conditions. Many of the chemicals and processes currently employed in metal finishing have been found to cause pollution and long‐term damage to the environment. Legislation and international agreements are now in place which ultimately will lead to a ban or major reduction in the use of many of these processes and coatings. The aircraft constructors and operators are seeking to adopt new protective schemes and treatments which will satisfy future environmental requirements.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Ionel Botef

– This paper aims to explore how the emerging cold spray technology could be integrated within a framework that finally could lead to more efficient aerospace operations.

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Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the emerging cold spray technology could be integrated within a framework that finally could lead to more efficient aerospace operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds research question and hypotheses and answers them using support from authorities, evidence or logic.

Findings

The emerging cold spray process should not be viewed in isolation, but viewed as a component of a broad framework that should include materials, technologies, market, infrastructure and strategies.

Originality/value

This paper highlights that, for more efficient cold spray aerospace applications, there is a need for an interdisciplinary approach that crosses traditional disciplines, schools of thought and professions.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology: An International Journal, vol. 87 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Americus

As technology becomes more complex, the need for coatings for specialised functions continues to increase. The electronics industry, for example, makes demands on the…

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As technology becomes more complex, the need for coatings for specialised functions continues to increase. The electronics industry, for example, makes demands on the coating industry for both conductive and insulative coatings. Highly temperature‐resistant coatings played a key role in the aerospace industry. Fire retardant coatings contribute to consumer safety, and coatings for plastics serve a number of protective and decorative functions. The list could be extended appreciably. Some of its newer components will be described here.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Ion Deposition Ltd is a new company established in Corby, Northamptonshire, as part of the SATRA Group of companies which specialises in international operations in the…

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Ion Deposition Ltd is a new company established in Corby, Northamptonshire, as part of the SATRA Group of companies which specialises in international operations in the metals business. IDL has been set up as a specialist coating facility — with the support of the Department of Trade and Industry — initially offering ion vapour deposition of aluminium to, in particular, the Aerospace Industry. Significant investment has been made in equipment and facilities, including the latest state‐of‐art ivadizer from McDonnell Douglas. The vacuum chamber is capable of accepting a component 5ft by 10ft, yet has a barrel coating insert for the processing of large volumes of small parts like rivets and fasteners. The coater is also fitted with the capability of the first cryogenic pumping system, which achieves lower vacuums quickly and efficiently. The IDL plant has been in full operation for seven months, and has already established a firm Aerospace orientated customer base both in the U.K. and mainland Europe. Future plans include the expansion of the Corby facility to include other highly specialised coating services to meet the needs of ‘high tech’ industries in the 1990s'.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Roger Blackford

Traditionally aerospace coatings have been formulated for performance. In an extreme case a faulty coating could contribute to an accident on a catastrophic scale. The…

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Traditionally aerospace coatings have been formulated for performance. In an extreme case a faulty coating could contribute to an accident on a catastrophic scale. The demands on aerospace coatings are severe because aircraft have unusual requirements. These requirements are dictated by the environment in which modern aircraft operate, the nature of the structure of the airframe, the way they are painted and the way in which they are used. As a consequence of all this, the paints which have been formulated for aerospace use usually differ from paint used in other industrial areas. It has often meant using ingredients which are regarded as hazardous either to health, such as chromate pigments, or to the environment, such as large quantities of strong solvents. Bearing this in mind, modern formulations have had to evolve, improving performance and taking into account the results of using hazardous ingredients which might affect users of the coatings, innocent bystanders and the environment. Here we consider the conflict between these influences and show the position reached within the industry.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 70 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Americus

It goes without saying that a large portion of the technology in the coatings industry is mature and not subject to revolutionary change. In an industry as large as the…

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It goes without saying that a large portion of the technology in the coatings industry is mature and not subject to revolutionary change. In an industry as large as the coatings industry, however, there is continual innovation. Often this innovation does not come from the industry itself but from related industries. These include raw materials suppliers as well as high technology aerospace and electronics industries. Indeed these two industries in particular require highly specialised types of coatings unavailable from the conventional coatings manufacturer. Many specialized coatings have been developed which command a high price but which can expect only small, specialized usage within the aerospace and electronics industry. For the most part, the coatings industry does not participate in these areas. These coatings are manufactured either by specialty companies or by the industries that need them.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 13 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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