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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Sara Rosengren

The purpose of the chapter is to understand advertising attention in new formats. More specifically, it argues that new advertising formats might force advertising

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to understand advertising attention in new formats. More specifically, it argues that new advertising formats might force advertising practitioners and researchers to reframe the challenges of gaining attention as one of understanding advertising approach rather than advertising avoidance.

Methodology/approach

The chapter is conceptual and builds on a review of literature on advertising attention, advertising avoidance, and advertising approach.

Research/practical implications

The chapter concludes with a review of future research directions. More specifically, it points out implications of shifting perspective from advertising avoidance to advertising approach for advertising practitioners and researcher alike.

Originality/value

The chapter offers a novel perspective on advertising attention in new advertising formats. In doing so, it hopes to stimulate more research on consumers’ willingness to approach (rather than avoid) advertising.

Details

Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Keke Wu, Yan Yu and Dayong Dong

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of advertising on investor behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of advertising on investor behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a novel and direct measure of investor attention: the number of investors whose watch lists has the stock.

Findings

The authors find that beyond its direct effect through information dissemination, advertising has an indirect effect with regard to grabbing investor attention and the trading response. The authors further find that an increase in attention induces a positive influence on the impact of advertising on investor behavior.

Originality/value

First, it complements studies of home bias, in which investors are more likely to buy familiar stocks. Second, it also complements the literature on advertising and investor attention and on attention and capital markets. Third, with a new and unambiguous measure of investor attention. Fourth, combining the direct and indirect aspects, this study presents a detailed description of the financial market effect of advertising.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

George G. Panigyrakis and Antigone G. Kyrousi

– The purpose of this paper is to review the literature published since 1985 regarding color effects in advertising and at setting an agenda for future research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature published since 1985 regarding color effects in advertising and at setting an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent publications (1985-2012) regarding the effects of color in advertising on consumers’ attention, memory and emotional responses are reviewed and discussed.

Findings

The review reveals that the effects of color on attention, emotion and memory still remain largely unknown, mainly due to the inherent complexity of the subject and lack of systematic research. At the same time, promising research venues and challenges for the future are identified in the form of research questions.

Originality/value

The key potential contribution of this paper stems from the identification of promising research questions and challenges for investigating the role of color in advertising.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Douglas L. Fugate

The use of humor is quite prevalent in the promotion of US goods and services. Estimated expenditures on humorous advertisements are in the billions and a majority of…

Abstract

The use of humor is quite prevalent in the promotion of US goods and services. Estimated expenditures on humorous advertisements are in the billions and a majority of advertisements may contain some humorous elements. Unfortunately, not much attention has been focused specifically on the role of humor in the advertising of services. By using the available humor‐related literature and synthesizing it with services marketing literature, a set of logically supported propositions was determined. Specifically, propositions are offered regarding the ability of humor to attract attention, increase comprehension, effect source credibility, and enhance liking. In addition, audience factors, the nature of the service product, the superiority of humor over non‐humor, the relatedness of humor to the product and the extension of humor into the international marketplace are examined.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1973

Sami Kassem and Douglas St. John

The use of sex and sexy illustrations in advertising is a subject that has been shunned by writers in fields such as communications, psychology, behavioural sciences, and…

Abstract

The use of sex and sexy illustrations in advertising is a subject that has been shunned by writers in fields such as communications, psychology, behavioural sciences, and even in the specific areas of consumer behaviour, marketing, and advertising. Although the current literature on consumer behaviour and advertising considers sex in the Freudian or Maslow sense, its use in advertising has not been explicitly elucidated. This is somewhat surprising when one considers that Freud maintained that sex or libido is the most important of all instincts and that apparent motives for an act often can be found in the sexual drive exerting itself in an unconscious and devious fashion.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Pradeep Korgaonkar, Ronnie Silverblatt and Bay O’Leary

The liaison between America Online and Hispanic Publishing Corporation to launch an interactive area called HISPANIC Online attests to the growing importance of the…

Abstract

The liaison between America Online and Hispanic Publishing Corporation to launch an interactive area called HISPANIC Online attests to the growing importance of the Hispanic consumers to US corporations. Still, little published research exists documenting the evaluation and usage of Web advertising by this growing segment of the US population. Applying Pollay and Mittal’s seven‐factor advertising beliefs model, the authors explore the Hispanic Web users’ beliefs, attitudes, and use of Web advertising. The seven belief factors regarding Web advertising, as well as attitudes and demographic factors, of the Hispanic respondents were studied in three usage contexts of Web advertising: the attention subjects paid to Web advertisements; the frequency of subjects clicking on Web advertisements; and the frequency of subjects leaving Web sites. Multivariate discriminant analysis suggests that the seven belief factors and the attitude factor, along with age and income levels, are significantly correlated with the three usage contexts of Web advertising. The study results and implications for Web advertisers are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Daniel Belanche, Carlos Flavián and Alfredo Pérez-Rueda

By integrating the evidence of various audience theories, a comparison is made of viewers’ information processing of new interactive video advertising formats (skippable…

Abstract

Purpose

By integrating the evidence of various audience theories, a comparison is made of viewers’ information processing of new interactive video advertising formats (skippable video ads) with traditional, non-skippable formats. The purpose of this paper is to focus on how exposure to a brand name at different moments during online video advertisements influences viewers’ recall.

Design/methodology/approach

A neuroscientific pre-test supported the selection of an arousing video, and a subsequent pre-test confirmed the scenario validity. Using a broader sample, the main study applied a 3×2 experimental design of different ad designs and formats.

Findings

Distinctions should be made between formats and audiences that lead to different information processing methods. Users exposed to skippable ads (active audiences) exert a higher control over advertising and tend to process the information presented in the initial part of an ad. In turn, users viewing non-skippable ads (passive audiences) should be exposed to the high arousal stimulus before presentation of the key information that the advertiser wants them to remember.

Practical implications

Advertising managers and content creators can use these results to improve the design of their online videos, and to achieve greater effectiveness in terms of information recall.

Originality/value

Skippable online videos have become a commonly used advertising format, but research into their effects is scarce. This study offers the first comparison of viewers’ reactions towards skippable vs non-skippable formats, in terms of brand recall and economic performance. Further research might extend this underdeveloped field of study and enhance the knowledge of video format processing in social media.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Devika Vashisht

The purpose of this study is to enhance the knowledge about advertising effects of brand placements in games on players’ brand recall and attitude. More specifically, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to enhance the knowledge about advertising effects of brand placements in games on players’ brand recall and attitude. More specifically, this study examines the varying effects of brand prominence on gamers’ brand recall and brand attitude under varied game-involvement and need for cognition (NFC) conditions from attention and elaboration perspectives in the context of in-game advertising (IGA).

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (brand prominence: prominent or subtle) × 2 (game-involvement: high or low) × 2 (NFC: high or low) between-subject measures design was used. Moreover, 240 student gamers participated in the study. A between-subjects measure multivariate analysis of variance was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed that for a game with prominent brand placement, low game-involvement resulted in greater brand recall than high game-involvement condition. Furthermore, for a game with prominent brand placement, high game-involvement condition resulted in more favorable brand attitude than low game-involvement condition. For a game with subtle brand placement, no differences in brand recall rates as well as brand attitudes were found between the high and the low game-involvement conditions. Likewise, for a game with prominent brand placement under low game-involvement condition, high NFC players reported higher brand recall rates and less favorable brand attitudes than the low NFC players. On the other hand, for a game with subtle brand placement under high-game-involvement condition, no differences in brand recall rates as well as brand attitudes were found between the high and the low NFC players.

Research limitations/implications

The process of experimentation used in this study to collect responses was susceptible to some limitations. However, this research adds to advertising literature from a non-traditional advertising viewpoint, predominantly in the context of IGA. This study enlightens the role of brand prominence and its boundary conditions to create customers’ brand memory and brand attitude. Likewise, this investigation adds to the marketing knowledge on how to embed and position the brands effectively in digital games taking into account the specific physiognomies of each game and individual traits of gamers.

Practical implications

This study provides a clear understanding of how marketers can design and develop effective games with a purpose to increase and improve customers’ awareness and attitudes toward the advertised brands by embedding brands in games. The experimental findings suggest the advertising practitioners and game designers to think for a right mix of game-specific factors, that is brand prominence, and individual and situational factors, that is game-involvement and NFC, while creating games to have a stoutest positive advergaming effect on players’ brand recall and brand attitude.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature of non-traditional advertising media, specifically to the context of IGA, by investigating the impact of brand prominence, game-involvement and gamers’ NFC on their brand recall and attitude. From the attention and elaboration perspectives, this study is the first attempt to understand how brand prominence and its boundary conditions, that is game-involvement and NFC, impact players’ brand recall and brand attitude.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Rahim Hussain, Ahmed Shahriar Ferdous and Gillian Sullivan Mort

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether advertising type (static or dynamic) and appeal (emotional or rational) moderate the relationship between web banner…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether advertising type (static or dynamic) and appeal (emotional or rational) moderate the relationship between web banner advertising frequency and consumer attitudinal response.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment involving 400 participants was conducted to test for the moderating effect. Factorial ANOVA is used to measure brand attitude.

Findings

The results identified that the web banner advertisement type acted as a moderator between frequency and brand attitude. However, the moderating effect of banner advertisement appeal was found to be insignificant at a single banner advertisement frequency (i.e. exposure) but significantly different at a higher frequency. The study findings provide better directives for online marketers.

Practical implications

The major limitation is the fact that the impact of banner advertisement frequency was manipulated from one to five exposures. Future research needs to determine what happens after the fifth exposure, perhaps ten exposures or more, to determine the wear-out effect and in turn, to decide on the optimal frequency level in an effort to design more appropriate web communication strategies.

Social implications

The result shows that pop-up banner advertisements are intrusive, and that high level of exposures to pop-up banner advertisement could annoy online users. Thus, online advertisers should avoid repeating the pop-up banner advertisements because this could adversely affect the attitude towards the online advertising in general, and could also negatively influence attitudes towards the brand and ultimately effect online purchase.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theory by providing more insights into the repetition effect, and comprehensive conclusions can be drawn based on the manipulation of banner advertisement frequency on different frequency levels. The research identifies that if the communication objective is to generate brand attitude, different strategies can be adopted depending on the banner advertisement type (pop-up vs static) and banner advertisement appeal (emotional vs rational).

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Kara Chan

Materialism among the younger generation has become a hot topic among parents, educators, marketers and policy makers, especially in Macao, a city where the influx of…

Abstract

Purpose

Materialism among the younger generation has become a hot topic among parents, educators, marketers and policy makers, especially in Macao, a city where the influx of tourists and the expanding gaming facilities bring the potential threat of materialism and the erosion of traditional family values. This study aims to develop a model using age, sex, social comparison of consumption with friends, attention to advertising, and self‐esteem to predict young people's materialistic values.

Design/methodology/approach

A probability sampling of 667 elementary and secondary school students aged 8 to 17 in Macao was conducted.

Findings

Results show that social comparison of consumption with friends was the most important factor in predicting respondents' endorsement of materialistic values, followed by self‐esteem.

Research limitations/implications

All the constructs are measured by self‐reporting. Some respondents may give socially desirable answers.

Practical implications

Parents and educators should be aware of young people's engagement in social comparison of consumption. They should discourage children and adolescents from comparing possessions with friends. Regulating young consumers' exposure to advertising would not be successful in discouraging materialism.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examines materialistic values of both children and adolescents using the same scale and survey methodology in Chinese society. Also, this is the first study reported on materialism in Macao.

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