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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Ashley K. Kable and Allan D. Spigelman

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the problem of second victims involved in adverse events and their need for adequate support.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the problem of second victims involved in adverse events and their need for adequate support.

Design/methodology/approach

The impact on second victims involved in adverse events and implications for organisational support were determined from previous studies and relevant publications about this problem.

Findings

The impact of adverse events on health professionals who are involved in them can be profound. These second victims can suffer extreme emotional distress, anxiety regarding perceptions of their competence and professional isolation, and may endure long-term professional and personal consequences. Some of the more severe outcomes include leaving the profession, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and suicide. Many studies report a substantial lack of organisational support for second victims. Key strategies have been recommended for organisations to implement to support second victims.

Originality/value

The authors note that recently published studies continue to report that organisational support is inadequate for second victims. Improved mechanisms of support would prevent the loss of second victims from the workforce, and ameliorate the severity and duration of the impact on second victims.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Alan Gillies and John Howard

Aims to describe the growing importance of information and its governance within public services. The paper starts by considering how scandals in three national public…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to describe the growing importance of information and its governance within public services. The paper starts by considering how scandals in three national public health systems have focused public attention on information issues. It describes a theoretical framework for improving information governance, and its practical implementation as a management tool. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits of the approach, and the consequences of not improving information governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework brings together a number of existing methodological approaches, principally the maturity model approach to process improvement, first described in the Software Engineering Institute's capability maturity model, and the novice‐to‐expert approach to competency.

Findings

The paper describes how these approaches can be synthesised into an integrated framework to manage organisational change and how that can be used to improve information governance within public sector organisations.

Research implications

The paper compares the framework and its practical implementation with existing solutions, arguing that existing solutions provide only partial solutions.

Originality/value

Considers how plans for future service improvements will be restricted unless information governance issues can be addressed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Sherif Shawer, Shirley Rowbotham, Alexander Heazell, Teresa Kelly and Sarah Vause

Many organisations, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, have recommended increasing the number of hours of consultant obstetric presence in UK…

Abstract

Purpose

Many organisations, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, have recommended increasing the number of hours of consultant obstetric presence in UK National Health Service maternity units to improve patient care. St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester implemented 24-7 consultant presence in September 2014. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the impact of 24-7 consultant presence upon women and babies, a retrospective review of all serious clinical intrapartum incidents occurring between September 2011 and September 2017 was carried out by two independent reviewers; disagreements in classification were reviewed by a senior Obstetrician. The impact of consultant presence was classified in a structure agreed a priori.

Findings

A total of 72 incidents were reviewed. Consultants were directly involved in the care of 75.6 per cent of cases before 24-7 consultant presence compared to 96.8 per cent afterwards. Negative impact due to a lack of consultant presence fell from 22 per cent of the incidents before 24-7 consultant presence to 9.7 per cent after implementation. In contrast, positive impact of consultant presence increased from 14.6 to 32.3 per cent following the introduction of 24-7 consultant presence.

Practical implications

Introduction of 24-7 consultant presence reduced the negative impact caused by a lack of, or delay in, consultant presence as identified by serious untoward incident (SUI) reviews. Consultant presence was more likely to have a positive influence on care delivery.

Originality/value

This is the first assessment of the impact of 24-7 consultant presence on the SUIs in obstetrics.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2018

Lovejeet Kaur, Manju Puri, Kallur Nava Saraswathy, Shubha Sagar Trivedi and Mohinder Pal Sachdeva

Recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL), a major contributor of reproductive wastage, affect maternal health both physically and mentally. Folate and B12 (Vitamin B12) deficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

Recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL), a major contributor of reproductive wastage, affect maternal health both physically and mentally. Folate and B12 (Vitamin B12) deficiency anemia is common in the reproductive age group women in developing countries like India. And due to proven role of folate in various maternal and fetal anomalies, women are routinely prescribed folic acid under various national policies. However, B12 supplementation is rare, despite known deleterious effects of its deficiency. The purpose of this paper is to understand RPL through anemia with special reference to folate and B12 imbalance.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiparous women with normal obstetric outcomes (n=135) and women with Idiopathic RPL (n=105) were recruited in the study. All women were non-pregnant and belonged to North Indian population. Hb, serum folate and B12 and plasma homocysteine were measured in all the women. Anemia was classified according to WHO guidelines (Hemoglobin (Hb)<12g/dL).

Findings

The incidence of Anemia was more among normal multiparous women (73 percent) as compared to women with RPL (60 percent). However, unlike folate deficiency anemia among controls, B12 deficiency anemia was observed in women with RPL. Moreover, these women, despite being less anemic, with high B12 deficiency and folate sufficiency (presumably due to folate supplementation) had more imbalanced vitamin metabolism, as evident from homocysteine levels. The study suggests that anemic or non-anemic deficiencies of B12 and folate among women with RPL may be combated by screening for both vitamins, rather than supplementing folate indiscriminately to all.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations is that ferritin levels for iron deficiency anemia could not be measured in this study.

Originality/value

The present study is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, where we looked for the role of imbalance of folate and B12 in women with RPL.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Fiona MacVane Phipps

The purpose of the International Journal of Health Governance (IJHG) review is to present a synopsis of the accepted articles in each issue, thus allowing readers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the International Journal of Health Governance (IJHG) review is to present a synopsis of the accepted articles in each issue, thus allowing readers to identify articles of particular interest to themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

The review editor reads all the submissions for each issue and then prepares an overview presenting the major themes with reference to supporting literature

Findings

The findings from all articles are presented in a succinct format.

Originality/value

The value of the IJHG review lies in the fact that no other Emerald publication includes a review section of this type. This unique contribution to this particular journal enhances usability and reader satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Saadia Saadi and Mébarek Djebabra

This paper is interested to assist organizations in the task of selecting and use appropriate indicators for their environmental evaluation procedure (EPE). This maximizes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is interested to assist organizations in the task of selecting and use appropriate indicators for their environmental evaluation procedure (EPE). This maximizes the successful deployment of the EPE process and as a consequence the introduction of good environmental practices. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

It consists of a proposal for a combined methodology based on the simultaneous use of environmental risk (ER) approach and RPN-based allocation method.

Findings

In the developed methodology, the authors use the principles of risk assessment and purpose a new formulation of weight allowance with reference to the severity of ERs and significance of environmental aspects.

Practical implications

Methodology suggested constitutes an invaluable help to implementation EPE process and as a consequence the introduction of good environmental practices.

Originality/value

Methodology suggested facilitates the process of environmental performance evaluation providing substantial assistance to one of the most important stages that is to decide which particular indicators will be considered.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Lorens A. Helmchen

Public reports of provider-specific patient outcomes aim to help consumers select suppliers of medical services. Yet, in an environment of rapidly changing medical…

Abstract

Public reports of provider-specific patient outcomes aim to help consumers select suppliers of medical services. Yet, in an environment of rapidly changing medical technology and increasingly heterogeneous patient populations, and because they necessarily reflect the experience of other patients who received care in the past, such reports may be of limited value in helping patients forecast the probability of an adverse outcome for each provider they are considering. I propose that providers underwrite insurance policies that promptly pay patients a predetermined sum after an adverse outcome. Patients can use such outcome warranties to infer quality differences among providers easily and reliably. In addition, outcome warranties efficiently reward both providers and patients for reducing the risk of adverse outcomes and thereby improve the safety and affordability of health care. As such, outcome warranties help advance four important goals of health care management: reduction of financial risk, recruitment and retention of physicians, remediation of adverse outcomes, and raising the provider's reputation.

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2020

Deva Rangarajan, Michael Peasley, Bert Paesbrugghe, Rajesh V. Srivastava and Geoffrey T. Stewart

This study aims to examine the impact of stress as a result of adverse life events on a salesperson’s ability to effectively manage customer relationships. The framework…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of stress as a result of adverse life events on a salesperson’s ability to effectively manage customer relationships. The framework identifies burnout as a key mediating variable and salesperson grit as a coping mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data is gathered from 364 B2B salespeople and investigated using structural equation modeling in Mplus 8.2.

Findings

The findings reveal adverse life events and their corresponding stress diminish a salesperson’s ability to manage customer relationships effectively through the mediators of reduced personal accomplishment and depersonalization. Thus, negative events of a personal nature can have a significant impact on salesperson outcomes and should be taken with the same level of seriousness as job-related stress. Furthermore, results show that salesperson grit provides mixed results as a coping mechanism.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that practitioners should be mindful of the negative impact adverse life events can have on work-related outcomes. Organizations and sales managers must be intentional in managing relationships with their salespeople and strategic in the structure they use to manage customer relationships. Recommendations include the use of regular one-on-one meetings to open up a dialogue about work or personal issues the salesperson is experiencing and assigning multiple resources or staff to service valuable customers, thereby not relying on solitary salespeople.

Originality/value

Employee well-being contributes to firm value; yet, this is the first study in sales to explore the impact of adverse life events on salesperson outcomes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Maureen Walsh Koricke and Teresa L. Scheid

Purpose – Patient safety and adverse events continue to present significant challenges to the US health care delivery system. Mandated reporting of adverse events can be a…

Abstract

Purpose – Patient safety and adverse events continue to present significant challenges to the US health care delivery system. Mandated reporting of adverse events can be a mechanism to “coerce” hospitals to identify, evaluate, and ultimately improve the quality and safety of patient care. The objective of this study is to determine if the coercion of mandated reporting impacts hospital patient safety scores.

Methods – We utilize the US News and World Report 2012–2013 Best Hospital Rankings which includes patient safety data from US teaching hospitals. The dependent variable is a composite measure of six indicators of patient safety during and after surgery. The independent variable is state mandated reporting of hospital adverse events. Three control variables are included: Magnet accreditation status, surgical volume, and the percentage of surgical admissions.

Findings – Using ordered logistic regression (n = 670 hospitals) we find a positive, but not significant, relationship between state mandated reporting and better patient safety scores.

Implications – This finding suggests that regulatory policy may not actually prompt performance improvement, and our data point to the need for further study of both formal and informal processes to manage patient safety within the hospital.

Originality – While increased reporting of adverse events has been linked to hospitals providing safer care, no research to date has examined whether or not state-level mandates actually lead to improvements in patient safety.

Details

Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Other Social Characteristics as Factors in Health and Health Care Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-798-3

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Marissa S. Edwards, Sandra A. Lawrence and Neal M. Ashkanasy

For over three decades, researchers have sought to identify factors influencing employees’ responses to wrongdoing in work settings, including organizational, contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

For over three decades, researchers have sought to identify factors influencing employees’ responses to wrongdoing in work settings, including organizational, contextual, and individual factors. In focusing predominantly on understanding whistle-blowing responses, however, researchers have tended to neglect inquiry into employees’ decisions to withhold concerns. The major purpose of this study was to explore the factors that influenced how staff members responded to a series of adverse events in a healthcare setting in Australia, with a particular focus on the role of perceptions and emotions.

Methodology/approach

Based on publicly accessible transcripts taken from a government inquiry that followed the event, we employed a modified grounded theory approach to explore the nature of the adverse events and how employees responded emotionally and behaviorally; we focused in particular on how organizational and contextual factors shaped key employee perceptions and emotions encouraging silence.

Findings

Our results revealed that staff members became aware of a range of adverse events over time and responded in a variety of ways, including disclosure to trusted others, confrontation, informal reporting, formal reporting, and external whistle-blowing. Based on this analysis, we developed a model of how organizational and contextual factors shape employee perceptions and emotions leading to employee silence in the face of wrongdoing.

Research limitations/implications

Although limited to publicly available transcripts only, our findings provide support for the idea that perceptions and emotions play important roles in shaping employees’ responses to adverse events at work, and that decisions about whether to voice concerns about wrongdoing is an ongoing process, influenced by emotions, sensemaking, and critical events.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

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