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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Claudine McCreadie

Launched in the spring, No Secrets, the government's latest adult protection guidance is expected to have a major impact on all agencies involved and interested in adult

Abstract

Launched in the spring, No Secrets, the government's latest adult protection guidance is expected to have a major impact on all agencies involved and interested in adult abuse. Here, using a novel approach, Claudine McCreadie, one of the country's leading elder abuse researchers, looks at what No Secrets will involve for those charged with its implementation in local areas, while providing a range of useful insights and hints.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Lorna Montgomery, Janet Anand, Kathryn Mackay, Brian Taylor, Katherine C. Pearson and Colin M. Harper

The purpose of this paper is to explore the similarities and differences of legal responses to older adults who may be at risk of harm or abuse in the UK, Ireland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the similarities and differences of legal responses to older adults who may be at risk of harm or abuse in the UK, Ireland, Australia and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw upon a review of elder abuse and adult protection undertaken on behalf of the commissioner for older people in Northern Ireland. This paper focusses on the desk top mapping of the different legal approaches and draws upon wider literature to frame the discussion of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different legal responses.

Findings

Arguments exist both for and against each legal approach. Differences in defining the scope and powers of adult protection legislation in the UK and internationally are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

This review was undertaken in late 2013; while the authors have updated the mapping to take account of subsequent changes, some statutory guidance is not yet available. While the expertise of a group of experienced professionals in the field of adult safeguarding was utilized, it was not feasible to employ a formal survey or consensus model.

Practical implications

Some countries have already introduced APL and others are considering doing so. The potential advantages and challenges of introducing APL are highlighted.

Social implications

The introduction of legislation may give professionals increased powers to prevent and reduce abuse of adults, but this would also change the dynamic of relationships within families and between families and professionals.

Originality/value

This paper provides an accessible discussion of APL across the UK and internationally which to date has been lacking from the literature.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Wenche Malmedal and Christiana Anyan

The aim of this study was to explore how Ghanaian staff in nursing homes and hospitals perceive abuse and neglect of older adults as well as to explore the nature and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to explore how Ghanaian staff in nursing homes and hospitals perceive abuse and neglect of older adults as well as to explore the nature and scope of abuse and neglect of older adults as it exists in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study used a qualitative research methodology that sets out to explore staff’s perception of elder abuse in nursing homes and hospitals in Ghana. Five nursing assistants and two caregivers were interviewed in two nursing homes and four nurses were interviewed in one hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was used for data collection.

Findings

The findings showed that elder abuse occurs in both hospitals and nursing homes, which might be attributed to different personal, situational and institutional characteristics as well as cultural and traditional value systems. Various factors at the level of interpersonal relationships contributed to elder abuse. Situational characteristics such as aggressive exchanges between residents and health workers and institutional characteristics such as limited facilities and resources to care for residents are all factors that were implicated in elder abuse. Finally, culture and traditional views, beliefs system and socioeconomic factors seem to be implicated in elder abuse and neglect.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that explores elder abuse and neglect in Ghanaian nursing homes and hospitals.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Guy Wishart

This article reports the findings of a national survey of the consultation of people with learning difficulties by social services departments in the development of adult

Abstract

This article reports the findings of a national survey of the consultation of people with learning difficulties by social services departments in the development of adult protection procedures and guidelines. The survey also considered the consultation of other service users, carers and family, and staff. Despite the rhetoric of user involvement in adult protection literature, low levels of consultation for people with learning difficulties were found.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jill Manthorpe, Neil Perkins, Bridget Penhale, Lisa Pinkney and Paul Kingston

This article updates a review submitted to the Department of Health (DH) in the light of the House of Commons Health Select Committee report on Elder Abuse. The review…

Abstract

This article updates a review submitted to the Department of Health (DH) in the light of the House of Commons Health Select Committee report on Elder Abuse. The review drew on recent research about elder abuse in the UK, including research published after the Select Committee's hearings, that made specific recommendations for areas of development in research and policy. The aim of this paper is to address specific questions posed by the Select Committee in light of developments up to mid 2005.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Paul Cambridge, Jim Mansell, Julie Beadle‐Brown, Alisoun Milne and Beckie Whelton

The purpose of this paper is to report the key findings from a study of adult protection referrals collected by two English local authorities during 1998‐2005.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the key findings from a study of adult protection referrals collected by two English local authorities during 1998‐2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Referrals were analysed for patterns relating to risk with client level data supplemented by information from the local authority databases and from the Care Quality Commission. The analysis also examined associations between adult protection processes and outcomes and looked at how adult protection monitoring data could be improved to better inform safeguarding management and practice at local and national level.

Findings

Sexual abuse was most frequently reported for people with intellectual disabilities, who were also at higher risk of abuse when living out of area. Older people were most at risk of financial abuse in community settings and of neglect in residential care.

Originality/value

The study identifies patterns of risk in the abuse of older people and those with intellectual disabilities and informs preventive interventions. It also indicates priorities for improving the quality and comparability of adult protection monitoring data.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Rachel Filinson, Claudine McCreadie, Janet Askham and Dinah Mathew

The parallels between child abuse and adult abuse have been frequently noted as public awareness of both has increased in recent decades. Both can involve the concealed…

Abstract

The parallels between child abuse and adult abuse have been frequently noted as public awareness of both has increased in recent decades. Both can involve the concealed victimisation of a weaker family member, for both interventions are difficult to implement because practitioners are loath to intrude into the privacy of the family and risk causing harm, and combating abuse of either type demands multi‐agency working. Significant differences between the two abuse constituencies have also been stressed, namely that adults are not invariably dependents reliant for care on the persons mistreating them and have the autonomy to resist efforts to intervene on their behalf.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Ruth Northway, Rachel Davies, Robert Jenkins and Ian Mansell

The importance and challenges in providing a good practice evidence base for adult protection are outlined. The literature search, review and mapping exercise that formed…

Abstract

The importance and challenges in providing a good practice evidence base for adult protection are outlined. The literature search, review and mapping exercise that formed part of the Abuse of Adults with Learning Disabilities: Policy, Practice and Educational Implications in Wales research study is detailed. The article presents examples from this evidence mapping exercise and considers the importance of adult protection research to the future development of policy and practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Camille Huggins, Akeem Modeste-James and Jennifer Rouse

This study aims to examine primary care physicians who are in a tenable position to identify signs of abuse in older adults as well as provide an opportunity to safeguard…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine primary care physicians who are in a tenable position to identify signs of abuse in older adults as well as provide an opportunity to safeguard them from abuse. Yet little is known about their clinical decision-making process during a clinic visit to detect abuse of older adults and provide adequate support in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

Fourteen primary care physicians working in a government operated free clinic were interviewed about their clinical decision-making process, in a narrative analysis format on the small island state of Trinidad and Tobago.

Findings

Primary care physicians expressed lack of knowledge about the primary health-care clinics’ protocols and procedures regarding abuse of older adults. Lack of attendance to educational in-service programs on recognizing and reporting abuse of older adults. A hands-off approach with non-medical abuse issues. Last there is no uniform assessments among the different types of physicians.

Practical implications

Although these findings are among primary care physicians located in Trinidad and Tobago, the context may be applied to primary care settings in other Caribbean islands. Major focus should be geared towards increasing awareness among the public and health-care professionals.

Originality/value

Sparse research on small island states regarding safeguarding policies for older adults who experience abuse.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Kate Taylor and Karen Dodd

Despite the introduction of Surrey‐wide vulnerable adults policies and procedures, monitoring figures from the Surrey Adult Protection Committee indicate that abuse is…

Abstract

Despite the introduction of Surrey‐wide vulnerable adults policies and procedures, monitoring figures from the Surrey Adult Protection Committee indicate that abuse is still being under‐reported for different service user groups. This study explored staff knowledge and attitudes towards abuse and the reporting procedure to further understand why abuse is not reported.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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