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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Jiajing Hu, Chuchu Ou, Mengying Zhang and Xingping Cao

Drawing on solidarity-conflict model, expectancy disconfirmation theory and bottom-up spillover theory, this study aims to explore how intergenerational conflict is linked…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on solidarity-conflict model, expectancy disconfirmation theory and bottom-up spillover theory, this study aims to explore how intergenerational conflict is linked to parents’ subjective well-being through the serial mediating effects of family intimacy and travel satisfaction, self-efficacy and travel satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 411 senior parents who have family travel experience, a structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study demonstrated the negative impacts of intergenerational conflict on parents’ travel satisfaction and subjective well-being and further reveals two serial mediators through individual level and family level (i.e. self-efficacy → travel satisfaction; family intimacy → travel satisfaction).

Practical implications

The findings of this research generate valuable practical implications for family members and destination organizations. Adult children should consider different generations’ needs to choose tourism products, help parents reduce tension and negative emotions about unusual environments and build confidence. The destination organizations need to design family interaction projects with a sense of rituals to enhance family intimacy.

Originality/value

This study focusing on the intergenerational conflict of adult children traveling with parents, empirically examines the negative impacts of intergenerational conflict on parents’ subjective well-being, uncovers the detrimental effects of family travel; it breaks the stereotype that family travel is always full of joy, enriching research on intergenerational relationships and family travel.

目的

研究基于团结-冲突模型、期望不一致理论和自下而上溢出理论, 旨在通过家庭亲密度和旅行满意度、自我效能感和旅行满意度的链式中介效应探索代际冲突如何影响父母的主观幸福感。

设计/方法/步骤

基于411位有过家庭旅行经历的老年父母的调查数据, 运用结构方程模型检验假设。

研究结果

研究验证了代际冲突对父母旅行满意度和主观幸福感的负面影响, 并进一步从个人层面和家庭层面揭示了两个链式中介的作用(即自我效能感→ 旅行满意度; 家庭亲密→ 旅行满意度)。

独创性/价值

研究聚焦成年子女与父母一起旅行的代际冲突, 实证检验了代际冲突对父母主观幸福感的负面影响, 发现了家庭旅行中的消极面, 打破了家庭旅行总是充满欢乐的刻板印象, 丰富了代际关系和家庭旅行的研究成果。

实践意义

研究结果为家庭成员和目的地组织提供了具有价值的实践指导。成年子女在选择旅游产品时需要考虑不同的代际需求, 帮助父母减少非惯常环境中的紧张和负面情绪, 建立自信心。目的地组织可设计更具仪式感的家庭互动项目, 帮助提高家庭亲密度。

Propositus

Basado en el modelo de solidaridad-conflicto, la teoría de inconsistencia de expectativas y la teoría de desbordamiento de abajo hacia arriba, este estudio tiene como objetivo explorar cómo el conflicto intergeneracional está relacionado con el bienestar subjetivo de los padres a través de los efectos mediados de serie de la intimidad familiar y la satisfacción de viaje, la autoeficacia y la satisfacción de viaje.

Diseño/método/procedimiento

Basado en datos de encuestas de 411 padres mayores que tienen experiencia en viajes familiares, un modelo de ecuación estructural fue utilizado para probar las hipótesis.

Hallazgos

Este estudio demostró el impacto negativo del conflicto intergeneracional en la satisfacción de viaje de los padres y el bienestar subjetivo, y además reveló dos mediadores de serie a nivel individual y nivel familiar (es decir, autoeficacia →satisfacción de viaje; intimidad familiar →satisfacción de viaje).

Originalidad/valor

Este estudio se centra en el conflicto intergeneracional de los hijos adultos que viajan con sus padres, para examinar empíricamente el impacto negativo del conflicto intergeneracional en el bienestar subjetivo de los padres, revela los aspectos negativos de los viajes familiares, rompe el estereotipo de que los viajes familiares siempre están llenos de alegría, lo que enriquece el estudio de las relaciones intergeneracionales y los viajes familiares.

Implicaciones practices

Los hallazgos de este estudio proporciona valiosas implicaciones prácticas para los miembros de la familia y los organizadores de destinos. Los hijos adultos consideran las necesidades de diferentes generacionales para elegir productos de viaje, ayudar a los padres a reducir la tensión y las emociones negativas en entornos inusual y desarrollar la confianza y la. Los organizadores de destinos deben diseñar programas de interacción familiar con sentido de rituales para potenciar la intimidad familiar de los padres.

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Alicia Murciano-Hueso, Judith Martín-Lucas, Sara Serrate González and Patricia Torrijos Fincias

The purpose of this paper is to understand the profile of use of gerontechnology in Spanish older adults considering their age group (60–70; 71–80 and over 80 years) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the profile of use of gerontechnology in Spanish older adults considering their age group (60–70; 71–80 and over 80 years) and to discern whether groups of subjects with similar characteristics can be established to ascertain which factors are behind the profile of frequent gerontechnology use.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study is presented to understand the profile of use of gerontechnology in Spanish older adults. The sample comprised 497 participants (aged between 60 and 94 years).

Findings

The results show that, even though most participants consider technology to be useful in their daily lives, there is still a lack of knowledge on how to use it, especially among older subjects. This highlights the importance of promoting technological cocreation initiatives such as senior living labs.

Research limitations/implications

Other researchers are encouraged to include the voices of older adults using gerontechnology in further studies.

Practical implications

If we want to increase the acceptance of technology by older adults, we must first let them take part in the design of the technologies they will use.

Social implications

This research provides promising data that should merit attention to contribute to the well-being and quality of life of older adults in a society where currently technology is a key part in every sphere of our daily life.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in the implications of “aging in place” studies today.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Walter Lloyd-Smith, Lindsey Bampton, Julia Caldwell, Anita Eader, Helen Jones and Steven Turner

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus…

532

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the experience of small number of safeguarding adult board managers who have provided reflections from practice.

Findings

This paper illustrates just some of the responses developed by safeguarding adult board managers and their boards to continue to deliver the work of safeguarding those at risk of abuse and harm in the face of unprecedented impact of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic on a key aspect of the safeguarding adult system in England.

Originality/value

The reflections reported here are not intended to offer a representative commentary on the experiences of those who oversee and manage safeguarding adults’ boards. It is intention to provide a flavour of some of the challenges and dilemmas faced and some of the creative solutions to address them used by one group of adult safeguarding practitioners.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Melanie Levasseur, Daniel Naud, Nancy Presse, Nathalie Delli-Colli, Patrick Boissy, Benoît Cossette, Yves Couturier and Julien Cadieux Genesse

This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse experiences of place and life trajectories, along with person-centered care.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was developed through group discussions, followed by an appraisal of aging models and validation during workshops with experts, including older adults.

Findings

Every residential setting and location where older adults go should be considered a “place,” flexible and adaptable enough so that aging in place becomes aging all over the place. Health-care professionals, policymakers and researchers are encouraged to collaborate around four axes: biopsychosocial health and empowerment; welcoming, caring, mobilized and supportive community; spatiotemporal life and care trajectories; and out-of-home care and services. When consulted, a Seniors Committee showed appreciation for flexible person-centered care, recognition of life transitions and care trajectories and meaningfulness of the name.

Social implications

Population aging and the pandemic call for intersectoral actions and for stakeholders beyond health care to act as community leaders. AAOP provides opportunities to connect environmental determinants of health and person-centered care.

Originality/value

Building on the introduction of an ecological experience of aging, AAOP broadens the concept of care as well as the political and research agenda by greater integration of community and clinical actions. AAOP also endeavors to avoid patronizing older adults and to engage society in strengthening circles of benevolence surrounding older adults, regardless of their residential setting. AAOP’s applicability is evidenced by existing projects that share its approach.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Harsimran Kaur Sidhu and M. Claire Greene

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to have a poor health status because of being diagnosed with a range of physical and mental health conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to have a poor health status because of being diagnosed with a range of physical and mental health conditions and experience disparities in health care. The purpose of this study is to find barriers to health care experienced by adults with ASD and find gaps in health care which health-care providers can work to fill.

Design/methodology/approach

This scoping review aimed to identify studies that report on disparities in health and health-care service provisions experienced by adults with ASD. The authors included articles that described health-care disparities for patients with ASD and were published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2010 and April 2022. The authors searched the following databases and medical journals to search for eligible studies: Google Scholar, Pubmed, Elsevier, Sage Publications and Embase. The authors comprehensively searched key terms related to ASD, health care and disparities.

Findings

The core defining features of ASD, which include communication and social impairments and deficits in sensory processing, were found to be barriers in the health-care experience of adults with ASD. Continued research and changes in health care, such as developing interventions to empower patients, adequately training providers and increasing the accessibility of the health-care system, are necessary to ensure adults with ASD receive adequate medical care.

Research limitations/implications

Additionally, clarifying the current literature on this topic can guide future research efforts to explore the influence of factors such as gender and the spectrum of autism itself leading to various levels of abilities and their influence on the health-care experience of adults with ASD.

Practical implications

Overall, the findings from this scoping review underline the importance of providing readily accessible evidence-based, age-appropriate primary and hospital health care for adults with ASD.

Social implications

Further interventions are needed to empower patients, adequately train providers, increase the accessibility of the health-care system, increase support for ASD patients and decrease discrimination.

Originality/value

This paper is a scoping literature review of the original work done by researchers in the field of developmental disorders and health care.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Chris Hatton

The purpose of this paper is to compare data from national social care statistics on the living situations of people with learning disabilities across England, Scotland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare data from national social care statistics on the living situations of people with learning disabilities across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

National social care statistics (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) reporting the living situations of adults with learning disabilities (residential and nursing care, living with family, other forms of accommodation) were accessed, with data extracted on trends over time and rate of service use.

Findings

There were substantial differences in the statistics collected across the UK. Overall, there were higher reported rates of adults with learning disabilities in residential/nursing accommodation in England than Scotland or Wales, but much lower reported rates of adults living in other forms of unsupported and supported accommodation and much lower reported rates of adults living with their families. In all three countries, trends over time suggest that reductions in residential care towards more independent living options may be stalling. In Northern Ireland reductions in currently extensive residential and nursing care services are continuing, unlike other parts of the UK.

Social implications

Despite similar policy ambitions across the four parts of the UK, statistics on the living situations of adults with learning disabilities report substantial differences.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to compare national social care statistics concerning the living situations of adults with learning disabilities across the UK. With increasing divergence of health and social service systems, further comparative analyses of services for people with learning disabilities are needed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Carol McKeough

Kent was one of the first social services departments to develop a specific adult protection policy in 1987. This paper charts the development of policy and references key…

Abstract

Kent was one of the first social services departments to develop a specific adult protection policy in 1987. This paper charts the development of policy and references key landmarks on this journey from the perspective of the policy manager's role. Opportunities are also taken to identify the key learning from this experience and the main challenges for the newly emerging safeguarding agendas.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Nigel White and Trevor Lawry

The police are key partners in adult protection work locally and take lead responsibility for investigating alleged crimes committed against vulnerable adults in our…

Abstract

The police are key partners in adult protection work locally and take lead responsibility for investigating alleged crimes committed against vulnerable adults in our communities. They therefore play a critical role in many serious and complex adult protection investigations. This paper describes how a large police service has organised its adult protection resources and maps out the basic processes and responsibilities involved in leading criminal investigations involving vulnerable adults. Using a case study it also identifies and examines the different demands criminal work brings at the inter‐agency, agency and case levels and identifies solutions and pointers for best practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1968

Roger De Crow

No day passes in the United States without the invention of new kinds of adult education programmes, in which new subjects are taught to new audiences of American adults

Abstract

No day passes in the United States without the invention of new kinds of adult education programmes, in which new subjects are taught to new audiences of American adults whose educational needs have been neglected. Moreover, the established programmes grow ever larger. These learning activities take such a profusion of forms that we are forced to use abstract terms such as ‘programmes’ or even ‘experiences’ to encompass them. The motives of the continuing learners, are equally diverse; they study almost any subject one could mention, from the minutely practical to the sublimely abstract. Even now, almost every significant agency and institution in American society is involved, somehow, in the provision of these programmes, since the formal education system, though ever more deeply involved in adult education, can never meet all the educational requirements of these millions of adults.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Tina Draper, Susan Roots and Hilary Carter

Adult protection has been a relatively recent concept for staff working within the health economy. Priorities have focused on raising awareness, developing an…

Abstract

Adult protection has been a relatively recent concept for staff working within the health economy. Priorities have focused on raising awareness, developing an understanding of safeguarding responsibilities, challenging established practices and attitudes and embedding the concept within the culture of NHS organizations and the daily work of staff at all levels. Although social services have the lead for safeguarding activities (Department of Health, 2000), statutory health bodies have now begun to integrate their adult protection activities more effectively and positively with social services and the police. This paper reviews the journey undertaken by the three primary care trusts (PCTs) in Kent and Medway in developing adult protection expertise and sharing multi‐agency adult protection practice with both social services and the police. The three safeguarding vulnerable adults leads from the PCTs have joined together to look at how far we have come and what we still need to achieve.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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