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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Walter Lloyd-Smith, Lindsey Bampton, Julia Caldwell, Anita Eader, Helen Jones and Steven Turner

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the experience of small number of safeguarding adult board managers who have provided reflections from practice.

Findings

This paper illustrates just some of the responses developed by safeguarding adult board managers and their boards to continue to deliver the work of safeguarding those at risk of abuse and harm in the face of unprecedented impact of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic on a key aspect of the safeguarding adult system in England.

Originality/value

The reflections reported here are not intended to offer a representative commentary on the experiences of those who oversee and manage safeguarding adults’ boards. It is intention to provide a flavour of some of the challenges and dilemmas faced and some of the creative solutions to address them used by one group of adult safeguarding practitioners.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Irshad CV, Deepak Kumar Behera and Umakant Dash

This study aims to document the participation of intra-household decision-making activities by older adults in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to document the participation of intra-household decision-making activities by older adults in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has used a nationally representative sample of 21,662 older adults (aged 60 and above) from the Longitudinal Ageing Study of India data of 2017–2018. Intra-household decision-making participation is measured based on decision-making activities that includes marriage of daughter/son, buying and selling of property, giving a gift to the family, education of family member and arrangement of social/religious events. This paper used bivariate analysis and binary logistic regression model to examine the factors associated with the participation of older adults in the intra-household decision-making activities.

Findings

The result has shown that older persons’ participation declined with increased age. This study has also found a difference in the participation of intra-households decision-making activities between male and female, rural and urban older adults, poor and rich older adults. Older adults with good health status who maintain social engagement and a good lifestyle are more likely to participate in the household’s decision-making activities.

Practical implications

Older adults with better economic and social status are more likely to participate in intra-household decision-making activities that make their life happier than the counterpart. Therefore, emphasis should be given to those vulnerable older adults who do not have any social and economic security in the society.

Originality/value

There are limited studies available on intra-household decision-making participation by older adults. This paper documents the intra-household decision-making participation by older adults in India with a nationally representative large sample.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Mostafa Kamalpour, Rebekah Eden, Rehan A. Syed, Laurie Buys, Amina Tariq and Jason Watson

This study aims to explain the value co-creation and co-destruction practices of older adults in an online community (OC).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain the value co-creation and co-destruction practices of older adults in an online community (OC).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting practice theory and service-dominant logic as a theoretical perspective, this paper examined an OC of older adults by conducting an inductive thematic analysis of the interactions of the participants in the community.

Findings

The analysis revealed older adults engage with three value co-creation plus one value co-destruction practices in the OC including, communal coping practices, happiness creation practices, social capital generation practices and disparaging practices for older adults.

Research limitations/implications

Illustrated in a conceptual model, this study extends previous work evidencing OCs serve as a platform for value co-creation and value co-destruction activities in the context of older adults. Further, it suggests OCs facilitate resilience of older adults through value co-creation practices. Recognition of value co-destruction in OCs is critical as it is detrimental to the resilience of older adults. This study provides the needed foundation to advance knowledge on the use of OCs by older adults and suggests future research directions.

Practical implications

Identifying co-creation and co-destruction practices of older adults in OCs enables service providers (e.g. caregivers) to engage better in online value co-creation practices. Further, the findings of this study address one of the main priorities of service science to investigate the impact of value co-creation on well-being.

Originality/value

Despite the significant engagement of older adults in OCs, there is a lack of enough knowledge in the literature regarding value co-creation and co-destruction practices of older adults in OCs. This study addressed this gap by explaining how older adults co-create and co-destruct value in online spaces.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Junjie Zhou, Rajiv Kishore, Meiyun Zuo, Ruochen Liao and Xiao Tang

As older adults are increasingly active in virtual communities (VCs), these platforms for knowledge exchange present opportunities for companies to use elder human…

Abstract

Purpose

As older adults are increasingly active in virtual communities (VCs), these platforms for knowledge exchange present opportunities for companies to use elder human capital. The purpose of this study is to understand the antecedent factors that motivate older adults’ knowledge contribution and knowledge seeking (KS) behaviors in VCs.

Design/methodology/approach

Rooted in socio-emotional selectivity and social cognitive theories, this study included five key variables and developed models for older adults’ knowledge contributing (KC)/KS behaviors. This paper tested the hypotheses using data from a sample of 204 older adults in 3 VCs in China.

Findings

The results provide support for most of the hypotheses and show that while other members’ participation (MP) acts as a substitute for meaning in life and attitude toward aging, it acts as a complement for outcome expectations (OE) focused on others and OE focused on oneself in their impacts on KC/KS activities.

Practical implications

The study provides practical insights for developing elder human resources via VCs to avoid knowledge loss.

Originality/value

This study described older adults’ unique characteristics when modeling their information and communication technologies-related behaviors and built two models to explain their KC/KS behaviors. It confirmed that the same factor has different levels of impact on older adults’ KC/KS behaviors in VCs. In addition, it confirmed and reinforced the complementary and substitutive effects of other MP as an environmental factor on these behaviors.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Chris Hatton

The purpose of this paper is to compare data from national social care statistics on the living situations of people with learning disabilities across England, Scotland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare data from national social care statistics on the living situations of people with learning disabilities across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

National social care statistics (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) reporting the living situations of adults with learning disabilities (residential and nursing care, living with family, other forms of accommodation) were accessed, with data extracted on trends over time and rate of service use.

Findings

There were substantial differences in the statistics collected across the UK. Overall, there were higher reported rates of adults with learning disabilities in residential/nursing accommodation in England than Scotland or Wales, but much lower reported rates of adults living in other forms of unsupported and supported accommodation and much lower reported rates of adults living with their families. In all three countries, trends over time suggest that reductions in residential care towards more independent living options may be stalling. In Northern Ireland reductions in currently extensive residential and nursing care services are continuing, unlike other parts of the UK.

Social implications

Despite similar policy ambitions across the four parts of the UK, statistics on the living situations of adults with learning disabilities report substantial differences.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to compare national social care statistics concerning the living situations of adults with learning disabilities across the UK. With increasing divergence of health and social service systems, further comparative analyses of services for people with learning disabilities are needed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Carol McKeough

Kent was one of the first social services departments to develop a specific adult protection policy in 1987. This paper charts the development of policy and references key…

Abstract

Kent was one of the first social services departments to develop a specific adult protection policy in 1987. This paper charts the development of policy and references key landmarks on this journey from the perspective of the policy manager's role. Opportunities are also taken to identify the key learning from this experience and the main challenges for the newly emerging safeguarding agendas.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Nigel White and Trevor Lawry

The police are key partners in adult protection work locally and take lead responsibility for investigating alleged crimes committed against vulnerable adults in our…

Abstract

The police are key partners in adult protection work locally and take lead responsibility for investigating alleged crimes committed against vulnerable adults in our communities. They therefore play a critical role in many serious and complex adult protection investigations. This paper describes how a large police service has organised its adult protection resources and maps out the basic processes and responsibilities involved in leading criminal investigations involving vulnerable adults. Using a case study it also identifies and examines the different demands criminal work brings at the inter‐agency, agency and case levels and identifies solutions and pointers for best practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Chang Sung Jang, Doo Hun Lim, Jieun You and Sungbum Cho

The purpose of this study is to reveal how research on brain-based learning (BBL) addressing adult learners’ education and training issues has contributed to the overall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to reveal how research on brain-based learning (BBL) addressing adult learners’ education and training issues has contributed to the overall knowledge base linking neuroscience, adult education and human resource development (HRD) research and practices. Through this comprehensive review of the BBL studies, this paper aims to expand the landscape of understanding educational phenomenon in adult education and organizational settings using the lens of neuroscience.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the content analysis method, this study extracts key research themes and methodological choices from the body of BBL studies. In addition, this paper explores the relationships and proximity among key concepts of BBL research using keyword network analysis. For data analysis, this study reviews the current literature on BBL addressing both adult education and HRD topics from 1985 to 2019.

Findings

The findings of this study provide a clearer picture of the potential mechanisms of BBL approaches observed in the literature of adult education and HRD. What has been found from the thematic analysis is that addressing misconceptions about the neuroscience of learning is regarded as an important topic. In terms of the methodological approaches, the literature review was a dominantly used method, whereas experimental or quantitative research has yet to be fully performed. Influential keywords and topics obtained from the keyword network analysis reveal the primary foci and structural patterns of current BBL research.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to theories and research in adult education and HRD scholarship as it provides an integrative view of key research themes and major issues about BBL. Additionally, our findings offer practical insights for adult educators and HR professionals to successfully apply neuroscientific approaches.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1968

Roger De Crow

No day passes in the United States without the invention of new kinds of adult education programmes, in which new subjects are taught to new audiences of American adults

Abstract

No day passes in the United States without the invention of new kinds of adult education programmes, in which new subjects are taught to new audiences of American adults whose educational needs have been neglected. Moreover, the established programmes grow ever larger. These learning activities take such a profusion of forms that we are forced to use abstract terms such as ‘programmes’ or even ‘experiences’ to encompass them. The motives of the continuing learners, are equally diverse; they study almost any subject one could mention, from the minutely practical to the sublimely abstract. Even now, almost every significant agency and institution in American society is involved, somehow, in the provision of these programmes, since the formal education system, though ever more deeply involved in adult education, can never meet all the educational requirements of these millions of adults.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Tina Draper, Susan Roots and Hilary Carter

Adult protection has been a relatively recent concept for staff working within the health economy. Priorities have focused on raising awareness, developing an…

Abstract

Adult protection has been a relatively recent concept for staff working within the health economy. Priorities have focused on raising awareness, developing an understanding of safeguarding responsibilities, challenging established practices and attitudes and embedding the concept within the culture of NHS organizations and the daily work of staff at all levels. Although social services have the lead for safeguarding activities (Department of Health, 2000), statutory health bodies have now begun to integrate their adult protection activities more effectively and positively with social services and the police. This paper reviews the journey undertaken by the three primary care trusts (PCTs) in Kent and Medway in developing adult protection expertise and sharing multi‐agency adult protection practice with both social services and the police. The three safeguarding vulnerable adults leads from the PCTs have joined together to look at how far we have come and what we still need to achieve.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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