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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Kim-Lim Tan, Tek-Yew Lew and Adriel K.S. Sim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of meaningful work against dimensions of job burnout, with psychological capital (PsyCap) as the mediator.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of meaningful work against dimensions of job burnout, with psychological capital (PsyCap) as the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 223 social workers were analyzed using the partial least squares–structural equation modeling.

Findings

As expected, meaningful work displayed a positive, direct and significant relationship with PsyCap. Contrary to expectations, meaningful work did not establish a negative direct relationship with all, but one dimension of job burnout. However, the results showed that it had indirect relationships with all job burnout dimensions through PsyCap where it displayed a mediating influence over the relationship.

Practical implications

Given the malleable attributes of PsyCap and the results showing meaningful work being a strong predictor of PsyCap, this study suggests that organizations should focus on imbuing greater meaningfulness in work to improve social workers’ PsyCap, which is essential in reducing their propensity for experiencing job burnout.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore in detail the effects of meaningful work on the dimensions of job burnout, with PsyCap being the mediator. This study has advanced the body of knowledge on meaningful work by contesting the claim that meaningful work was an effective predictor in reducing job burnout. In addition, this study has extended the understanding of the upward-spiral concept and the resource caravan concept.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Kim-Lim Tan, Tek-Yew Lew and Adriel K.S. Sim

This paper aims to identify a possible solution as to how meaningful work could be considered as a lever in attracting and retaining Generation Y (Gen-Y) employees to work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify a possible solution as to how meaningful work could be considered as a lever in attracting and retaining Generation Y (Gen-Y) employees to work in the Singapore hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the perspectives of earlier conceptual papers by Chacko et al. (2012) and Solnet and Hood (2008) in an effort to identify root causes and a possible solution. The context of Singapore and the international literature are also reviewed to establish theoretical and practical gaps that need to be filled.

Findings

The results from this study can be used as a guide to enable hotels to improve the attraction, retention and management of Gen-Y employees. This is crucial in hotels where many properties are facing challenges in attracting and retaining hotel employee talent.

Originality/value

The paper provides a fresh examination of the characteristics and behaviours of Gen-Y employees, as well as suggests an improved organizational approach to attraction and retention. This methodology includes an element of positive psychology, in the form and experience of meaningful work.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Kim-Lim Tan, Adriel K.S. Sim, Delon Chai and Louise Beck

Festivals are becoming a growing commodity for countries keen to increase their portfolio of tourist attractions. The benefits experienced by the local community and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Festivals are becoming a growing commodity for countries keen to increase their portfolio of tourist attractions. The benefits experienced by the local community and the visitors at festivals are multi-faceted. However, existing tourism research has primarily focussed on the value of the event in terms of customer satisfaction. It has yet to explicitly identify the affect music festivals have on individuals' well-being. This study aims to investigate the effect of music festival unique attributes on visitors' satisfaction levels and how it influences individuals' well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A paper-based questionnaire was distributed to participants visiting the Miri Country Music Festival (MCMF) in Malaysia, and partial least squares–structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results from 288 respondents revealed that the festival programme was the main attribute in influencing one's satisfaction to a festival, which in turn improved one's subjective well-being. The other attributes that influence an individual's satisfaction in a music festival include food, information services and festival value.

Originality/value

This study advances the body of knowledge by integrating the self-determination theory and the environmental psychology theory as the bases that a music festival potentially provides an engaging environment that is conducive for positive well-being among the participants. This is the first study that confirms the influence of the different predictors on the perceived value of MCMF, proposing a model in developing a better understanding of the participants' well-being.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Kim-Lim Tan, Tek-Yew Lew and Adriel K.S. Sim

This paper investigates the effect and the predictive capacity of work engagement on personal and job resources, in the form of psychological capital (PsyCap) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the effect and the predictive capacity of work engagement on personal and job resources, in the form of psychological capital (PsyCap) and meaningful work in the non-profit organisations (NPO)s settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 303 social workers working in New Zealand's NPOs. The hypotheses were tested using the partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

Results of this study reveal that work engagement is positively related to both PsyCap and meaningful work. It shows that work engagement is instrumental in enhancing one's PsyCap at the same time improving one's perception of work. The model demonstrates good predictive power.

Originality/value

This study advances our understanding of the relationship of outcomes to resources as postulated in the JD-R theory. This is the first few studies to examine the effect of work engagement on PsyCap and meaningful work, as well as the mediating effect of PsyCap on the relationship between work engagement and meaningful work. At the same time, it provides conceptual clarity on the role of specific job resource and personal resource, demonstrating that resources do not operate in isolation but can build more resources. This study also contributes to the field of human resource management using a predictive PLS-SEM technique.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Adriel K.S. Sim, Kim-Lim Tan, Joseph Kee-Ming Sia and Ivy S.H. Hii

In the last decade, female students' enrolment in higher education has experienced significant growth. However, male and female students still differ in criteria set of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the last decade, female students' enrolment in higher education has experienced significant growth. However, male and female students still differ in criteria set of choosing higher education institutions. While several studies have been disentangled in developed countries in analyzing gender differences in pursuing higher education, a similar area of studies conducted in developing countries is scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine gender differences and the factors that influence first-year students' choice of higher education in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 575 students who were either enrolled in an undergraduate or foundation program of an international branch campus. We tested the hypotheses using partial least squares multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA).

Findings

Our results revealed that graduate employability, information sources, program characteristics, institution characteristics and campus safety were influential factors affecting the students' institutional choice. The MGA results also indicated that gender differences exist in selecting higher education institutions. Male students are more strongly influenced by information sources such as family, friends, media compared with female students.

Originality/value

Very few international branch campus choice studies explore gender differences in developing countries. This study enriches the current literature of institutional choice through the lens of an Asian developing country and extends the discourse regarding the role of gender in influencing students' institutional choice, of which they are commonly overlooked in most literature. The study has significant implications for student recruitment managers in higher education institution to develop marketing strategies targeting to potential male and female students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Mohamed Yamin and Adriel K.S. Sim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of local project teams on critical success factors and project success in the context of international development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of local project teams on critical success factors and project success in the context of international development projects in Maldives. It identifies the critical success factors of international development projects, examines how the success of international development projects in Maldives is perceived by local project team members, and analyzes the relationship between critical success factors and project success from the project teams’ perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was used and 41 project team members participated in the study. Correlation analysis and regression analysis were performed to understand the relationship with project success and critical success factors.

Findings

The study found out that the levels of success of projects were perceived high among the project teams. The results indicated that monitoring CSF, coordination CSF, design CSF, training CSF, and institutional environment CSF had a significant relationship with project success. However, results of the regression analysis indicated that only monitoring CSF was significant in influencing project success.

Research limitations/implications

The limited sample size and optimism bias of respondents were a constraint. Furthermore, further analysis of data may be required to advance analysis.

Originality/value

The study looks through the lens of project implementation teams in order to provide insights from their vantage point. The study provides insights based on the Maldivian context which will benefit similar island nation communities implementing similar projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena and Richard Teare

This paper aims to profile the Worldwide hospitality and Tourism Themes (WHATT) issue “What are the key innovative strategies needed for future tourism in the world?”…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to profile the Worldwide hospitality and Tourism Themes (WHATT) issue “What are the key innovative strategies needed for future tourism in the world?”, with reference to the experiences of the theme editor and writing team.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses structured questions to enable the theme editor to reflect on the rationale for the theme issue question, the starting point, the selection of the writing team and material and the editorial process.

Findings

This paper provides a framework to facilitate discussions between international scholars in hospitality and tourism to re-define a buzzword. For this theme issue, the buzzword was “innovation”. Summaries of 13 papers written on innovative strategies in hospitality and tourism around the world were then analysed to fine-tune the definition.

Practical implications

The theme issue outcomes provide lines of enquiry for others to explore and reinforce the value of WHATTs approach to collaborative research and writing.

Originality/value

The collaborative work reported in this theme issue offers a unified but contrarian response to the theme’s strategic question. Taken together, the collection of articles provides a detailed picture of the key innovative strategies needed for future tourism.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

C. Dean Campbell

The underrepresentation of African-American faculty in the US professoriate has persisted for some time. Relatedly, adjunct faculty remain a fast-growing sector of the…

Abstract

The underrepresentation of African-American faculty in the US professoriate has persisted for some time. Relatedly, adjunct faculty remain a fast-growing sector of the professoriate. Adjunct faculty include “experts” and “specialists” who teach postsecondary courses with a narrow focus and with content tailored to their full-time employment. Using a qualitative narrative approach, I delineate ways I construct meaning for myself as a part-timer. I develop a cultural interpretation of adjunct teaching that provides alternative view of professional socialization to counter the ongoing challenge of increasing the number of Black faculty in higher education. In doing so, three themes from the data (ideal worker as adjunct, historical role models, and clinical value of course content) suggest the identity of part-time faculty is situated in personal, professional, and cultural experiences.

Details

The Beauty and the Burden of Being a Black Professor
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-267-6

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