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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Adrian Furnham, Luke Treglown and Daria Topic

The study aims to look at whether trait emotional intelligence (EI) was related to the job performance level of a manager, their immediate team and their peers.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to look at whether trait emotional intelligence (EI) was related to the job performance level of a manager, their immediate team and their peers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looked at the relationship between trait EI and performance appraisals, as evaluated by the person themselves, their peers, manager and team. Trait EI facets of 903 employees were compared to evaluated performance appraisals of the different groups four months later.

Findings

All 15 of the correlations (20 < r < 0.42) between the emotional intelligence facets and self-ratings were significantly positive whilst for managers 10, peers 6 and team only 4 were significant, though all were positive. In line with affective primacy theory, structural equation modelling revealed performance was rated higher by non-manager colleagues when employees exhibited traits associated with positive interpersonal interactions.

Originality/value

There are very few studies using multi-source ratings to explore the consequences of EI on a manager’s team and peers.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Bruce Kirkcaldy and Adrian Furnham

In a weekly managerial newspaper survey the abbreviated German version of the Occupational Stress Indicator’s Coping scale was completed anonymously by over 200 readers…

1383

Abstract

In a weekly managerial newspaper survey the abbreviated German version of the Occupational Stress Indicator’s Coping scale was completed anonymously by over 200 readers. Of these we selected only those who were categorised as management (n = 160) in our study. The mean coping score for the full Coping scale was 36.98 (SD 8.65) with a split half reliability of 0.76 (total alpha = 0.84). Alpha coefficients for the two subscales were 0.85 and 0.58. There was no difference in coping profiles of men and women, but different levels of management and educational status did influence preference for coping styles. More specifically, as we progress to the more senior levels of management, delegation and maintaining stable relationships are considered the most useful forms of coping with stress. The more academically trained manager with a postgraduate degree is more likely to implement such coping methods as effective time‐management and planning ahead.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Adrian Furnham and Jessica Li

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender portrayal in food and beverage advertisements in Hong Kong.

1704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender portrayal in food and beverage advertisements in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 45 commercials produced locally in Hong Kong and 45 commercials produced in a Western country were separately coded for ten content categories: time of day, age, mode of presentation, credibility‐basis, role, location, argument, reward type, background and end‐comment..

Findings

Gender‐role effects were non‐significant in a majority of the content categories contrary to findings in other research in this area. This finding is discussed in the context of the changes in Hong Kong culture

Research limitations/implications

Sampling was limited to broadcast recording on TVB Jade in December 2007.

Practical implications

The absence of gender based content in food and beverage advertising should inform marketing practice in a SE Asian context.

Originality/value

This paper modifies a well‐established research procedure and analyses food and beverage advertising in Hong King. This has not been done before.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Adrian Furnham, Andreas Eracleous and Tomas Chamorro‐Premuzic

The current study aims to investigate the extent to which personality and demographic variables contribute to motivation and job satisfaction as defined by the two‐factor theory.

53156

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate the extent to which personality and demographic variables contribute to motivation and job satisfaction as defined by the two‐factor theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 202 fulltime workers completed three questionnaires measuring their personality, work motivation and satisfaction.

Findings

Results demonstrate that between 9 and 15 per cent of the variance in motivation is accounted for by demographic variables and the Big Five personality traits. In line with previous findings (Judge et al.), conscientiousness and job status were both significant predictors of job satisfaction, and between 11 and 13 per cent of the variance was accounted for by personality and other demographic variables.

Research limitations/implications

This study was restricted to self‐report measure. It never took into consideration other potential confounds like a person's job history, level and responsibilities. It also showed personality factors accounted for very little evidence of the variance.

Practical implications

Implications are discussed in terms of attempts to improve employee attitudes without considering the effects of individual differences. An acknowledgement that individual differences can affect the success of an intervention, may contribute to the design of effective work reorganisation schemes that are better suited to the employees they seek to benefit.

Originality/value

The value of this paper was that it looked at how personality and demographic factors may influence a person's work satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Bianca Bush and Adrian Furnham

The study which this paper documents aimed to test nine hypotheses through the use of content analysis of gender stereotypes within the advertising of…

2365

Abstract

Purpose

The study which this paper documents aimed to test nine hypotheses through the use of content analysis of gender stereotypes within the advertising of educational/non‐educational children's games.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 130 UK adverts, fitting the time period of 1970‐2011, were used. Then 17 dimensions of each advertisement were coded and chi‐squared analyses were carried out. Additional comparisons were carried out examining differences in pre‐1990 and post‐1990 adverts, age and game categories.

Findings

Nine hypotheses were tested and most were supported, including: males being shown as the main characters in educational adverts compared to non‐educational adverts; gender stereotypes occurring within advertising ‐ adverts aimed at males consisted of males being the main characters, female‐orientated adverts consisted of females presenting the majority of adverts; and young males were displayed alone whereas females were either alone or supervised by another female.

Originality/value

This study is possibly the first to conduct a thorough content analysis of television advertisements for games aimed at children. It reveals the amount of stereotyping found in general advertisements aimed at adults in many western countries.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Bruce Kirkcaldy, Adrian Furnham and Terence Martin

Several hundred German parents completed a questionnaire to assess their attitudes towards pocket money and economic socialisation. In addition trait competitiveness and…

2152

Abstract

Several hundred German parents completed a questionnaire to assess their attitudes towards pocket money and economic socialisation. In addition trait competitiveness and occupational stress were measured. Demographic variables were less predictive of competitiveness compared to psychological/attitudinal factors. The more competitive oriented parents displayed a distinct monetary attitude profile: they were less liberal, more structured and budget‐oriented. They used money significantly more as a reinforcer for educational purposes, e.g. educational or scholarly success, and as an instrument to teach autonomy. Subjectively perceived occupational stress was determined by diverse socio‐demographic variables, although the stress‐demographic relationship was moderated by gender. Older fathers and men from a poor social‐economic background (as children) tended to show greater job‐related stress. Conversely, mothers from “superior” SES, with more siblings, and fewer children of their own, reported more occupational stress.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Adrian Furnham and Aseel Hamid

The purpose of this paper is to produce a comprehensive and tabulated review of the many and scattered papers on public mental health literacy, with particular focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to produce a comprehensive and tabulated review of the many and scattered papers on public mental health literacy, with particular focus on people's ability to recognise mental illness and beliefs about the treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a review and tabula study. Comprehensive tables describe studies: the first looks at the beliefs of three different groups (the general public, students and young people) within developed English-speaking countries, and the second on studies from non-English-speaking countries.

Findings

Some illnesses like depression and schizophrenia are well researched and others like anxiety or personality disorders largely ignored. The conclusion considers terminological (the loose use of different terms), theoretical (little or no theoretical models) and methodological (heavy reliance on printed, culture-bound vignettes) issues in the developing area of research.

Originality/value

No such review exists and this therefore should be of considerable value to people working in the area.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Adrian Furnham, Richard Cook, Neil Martin and Mark Batey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mental health literacy of students. This study is part of the growing interest in mental health literacy among young people.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mental health literacy of students. This study is part of the growing interest in mental health literacy among young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 400 university students indicated their knowledge of over 90 psychiatric illnesses labels derived from DSM:IV. They rated disorders on six questions concerning whether they had heard of the disorder; knew anybody with it; could define or describe it; knew what causes it; whether those with it can be cured; and whether it is common.

Findings

On average, participants had heard of just over one‐third of the various illnesses. Those who rated the conditions as more common deemed them to have more known causes and to be more curable. Emotionally intelligent, open‐to‐experience females who had studied relevant academic subjects claimed to be better informed. The participant's age and personality, as well as whether they had studied clinical psychology, related to their awareness.

Research limitations/implications

The paper favours recognition of mental disorders over an attempt to understand how well young people understand mental illness.

Originality/value

No study has attempted this methodology in the study of mental health literacy.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Gorkan Ahmetoglu, Stacey Dobbs, Adrian Furnham, John Crump, Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Elmira Bakhshalian

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of the Five-Factor Model Personality Disorder (FFM PD) count technique to industrial, work, and organizational…

1983

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of the Five-Factor Model Personality Disorder (FFM PD) count technique to industrial, work, and organizational (IWO) criteria. In this vein, the present research sought to extend previous studies (e.g. De Fruyt et al., 2009) by eliminating common method variance, and by including several objectively assessed IWO criteria, namely, managerial level, intelligence, and creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,659 working adults reported their managerial level in their organization, and completed two intelligence tests, a measure of creativity, and a measure of the Big Five personality traits in an assessment centre. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results showed that the FFM PD counts were significantly associated with each IWO criteria. Results also show that specific linear combinations of Five-Factor Model facets can explain a larger proportion of the variance in these criteria. Finally, normative benchmark values are provided and validated for personnel development contexts in the UK.

Research limitations/implications

Because the FFM PD score-distributions were limited to one assessment setting (medium stakes) only, the use of proposed benchmarks may not be appropriate for other contexts.

Practical implications

Considering the mounting evidence in the area, assessing dark side traits is likely to be desirable for organizations – particularly in selection and development settings.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate the validity of the FFM PD count technique in relation to objectively measured IWO criteria.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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