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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Cátia Sousa, Gabriela Gonçalves, Joana Santos and José Leitão

The globalization of work has contributed to a great increment in cross-cultural interactions, contributing to a new impetus in the expatriates’ topic. The costs…

Abstract

Purpose

The globalization of work has contributed to a great increment in cross-cultural interactions, contributing to a new impetus in the expatriates’ topic. The costs associated with the failed international missions are high, and the identification of effective adjustment strategies is of extreme importance, both for organizations and for individuals. The purpose of this paper is to identify the kind of practices that are developed by organizations and their impact on the adjustment of expatriates.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the proposed objective, a systematic review of literature (from the late 1980s to the present day) will be carried out.

Findings

Based on five articles on the topic, the results show that there are few studies that assess the impact of the types of adjustment to organizational practices, with the cross-cultural training and language training being the most common. These practices have shown a positive effect on performance and adjustment of expatriates.

Originality/value

The authors feel the lack of studies that have adequate indicators to measure the integration and effectiveness of the adjustment of expatriates.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Alan Fish and Jack Wood

Identifies a number of critical spouse/partner preparation and adjustment factors derived from a larger study that examined the expatriate career management practices of…

Abstract

Identifies a number of critical spouse/partner preparation and adjustment factors derived from a larger study that examined the expatriate career management practices of 20 Australian business enterprises with a physical presence in the East‐Asian business region. Addresses concerns expressed by Adler (1991) that attention to the needs of an accompanying spouse is at best only having a neutral impact on spouse adjustment. That is, organizations have largely failed to assist spouses in establishing what Adler (1991) described as “a meaningful portable life”. Reviews spouse/partner preparation and adjustment from the views expressed by Australian business executives, expatriate and repatriates involved in business operations in East‐Asia. The views of spouses and partners were not gathered in this study. Results point to the need for re‐assessment of existing spouse/partner preparation and adjustment. While results are tentative, evidence from this study confirms the need for more attention by Australian organizations to spouse/partner preparation and adjustment, with particular attention to the development of business environment awareness and empathy which may assist in advancing Adler’s concept of “a meaningful portable life”.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Julian Winterheller and Christian Hirt

Using a Bourdieuian perspective, the purpose of this paper is to analyse how highly skilled migrants (HSMs) from transition economies develop their careers by accumulating…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a Bourdieuian perspective, the purpose of this paper is to analyse how highly skilled migrants (HSMs) from transition economies develop their careers by accumulating and using career capital upon migration.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretative approach was chosen to depict the career patterns of 18 HSMs from Southeast Europe. Semi-structured interviews were used to gather data about their career experiences in Western Europe and their home countries.

Findings

Findings reveal four different career patterns that show how individuals develop their careers and adjust to the work environment by accumulating and using career capital. Building up country-specific work-related social contacts and gaining work experience in local companies were found to represent key elements in their adjustment process. Additionally, the findings show that organisational support facilitates the processes of individual adjustment.

Originality/value

This paper emphasises that individuals do not always have to assimilate to the work environment of the host country but can also bargain over the value of their career capital in their adjustment process. Contrasting with previous literature this perspective presents a novelty.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

M.J. Taylor, M. Baskett, S. Duffy and C. Wren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural difficulties in the UK higher education (HE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study in a UK university was undertaken over a two‐year period.

Findings

A variety of types of adjustments may be necessary for UK university students with emotional and behavioural difficulties including adjustments to pastoral care, teaching and assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The case study focussed on only three students with emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, given that the number of students entering UK universities with such difficulties is increasing, the results of this research can hopefully inform the teaching of future students.

Practical implications

This paper addresses what UK university teaching staff may need to do to support students with emotional and behavioural difficulties.

Originality/value

Although research has been conducted into the teaching of individuals with emotional and behavioural difficulties in schools, little if any research has been undertaken regarding teaching such students at university level.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Roger Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that might contribute to the ease with which marketing executives in UK charities who have been promoted to senior…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that might contribute to the ease with which marketing executives in UK charities who have been promoted to senior general management positions adjust to the occupancy of these roles.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 37 individuals with functional marketing backgrounds currently holding top general management positions in large fundraising charities were interviewed using a frame-worked occupational autobiographic narrative approach. The research was informed by aspects of newcomer adjustment theory, notably uncertainty reduction theory.

Findings

Social and personal considerations were much more important determinants of the ease of assimilation into top management positions in charities than were technical job-related matters. Role ambiguity constituted the main barrier to smooth adjustment. Mentoring, planned induction programmes, the nature of a person’s past work experience and the individual’s social status critically affected how readily a marketer fitted into a top management role. Disparate sets of factors influenced different elements of managerial newcomer adjustment (role clarity, self-efficacy, and social acceptance).

Research limitations/implications

As the participants in the study needed to satisfy certain narrowly defined criteria and to work in a single sector (large fundraising charities) the sample was necessarily small. It was not possible to explore the effects on operational performance of varying degrees of ease of newcomer adjustment.

Practical implications

Individuals promoted to top management posts in charities should try psychologically to break with the past and should not be afraid of projecting a strong functional professional identity to their new peers. These recommendations can be expected to apply to organisations in general which, like large charities, need senior management mentoring and induction programmes to assist recently promoted individuals from function-specific backgrounds; job descriptions for top management posts that are clear and embody realistic expectations; and “shadowing” and training activities for newly appointed senior managers with function-specific backgrounds.

Originality/value

The study is the first to apply newcomer adjustment theory to the assimilation of functional managers into more senior general management. It examines a broader range of potential variables affecting managerial newcomer adjustment than has previously been considered. Relevant issues are examined in the context of an important sector: fundraising charities.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Marie Beaulieu, Michelle Côté and Luisa Diaz

The purpose of this paper is to present an inter-agency practice integrated within a police intervention model which was developed for police officers and their partners…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an inter-agency practice integrated within a police intervention model which was developed for police officers and their partners in Montréal.

Design/methodology/approach

The Integrated Police Response for Abused Seniors (IPRAS) action research project (2013-2016) developed, tested, and implemented a police intervention model to counter elder abuse. Two linked phases of data collection were carried out: a diagnostic of police practices and needs (year 1) and an evaluation of the implementation of the intervention model and the resulting effects (years 2 and 3).

Findings

The facilitating elements to support police involvement in inter-agency practices include implementing a coordination structure regarding abuse cases as well as designating clear guidelines of the roles of both the police and their partners. The critical challenges involve staff turnover, time management and the exchange of information. It was recognised by all involved that it is crucial to collaborate while prioritising resource investment and governmental support, with regards to policy and financing, as well as adequate training.

Practical implications

The IPRAS model is transferable because its components can be adapted and implemented according to different police services. A guideline for implementing the model is available.

Originality/value

In the scientific literature, inter-agency collaboration is highly recommended but only a few models have been evaluated. This paper presents an inter-agency approach embedded in an evaluated police intervention model.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Mark J. Taylor, Sandi Duffy and David England

The purpose of this paper is to examine the type of adjustments to delivery appropriate for students with dyslexia in a UK higher education setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the type of adjustments to delivery appropriate for students with dyslexia in a UK higher education setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study in a UK university department was conducted over a four‐year period.

Findings

It was found that a variety of adjustments may be required for students with dyslexia in a UK higher education environment including adjustments to teaching delivery, assessment and pastoral care. In addition it is necessary to provide a managed transition from school/college/work to higher education.

Research limitations/implications

Although the case study reported here focusesd on only 22 students with dyslexia, the number of students entering UK higher education with dyslexia is likely to increase and institutions need to be aware of the adjustments that may potentially be required.

Originality/value

Previously few students with dyslexia had attended university in the UK. However, growing numbers of such students are now attending university, but thus far little, if any, research has been conducted regarding the adjustments that may need to be made for such students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Umma Habiba, Yukiko Takeuchi and Rajib Shaw

Many people as well as the government in Bangladesh perceive floods and cyclones as recurrent environmental hazards in the country. They also view that these two hazards…

Abstract

Many people as well as the government in Bangladesh perceive floods and cyclones as recurrent environmental hazards in the country. They also view that these two hazards are the main contributors to crop loss in the country. But, in reality, droughts afflict the country at least as frequently as do major floods and cyclones, averaging about once in 2.5 years (Adnan, 1993, p. 1; Erickson, 1993, p. 5; Hossain 1990, p. 33). In some years, droughts not only cause a greater damage to crops than floods or cyclones, but they also generally affect more farmers across a wider area (Paul, 1995). If not institutionally and economically tackled, the consequences tend to have a far-reaching effect on the given society, and the socioeconomic problems would assume a chronic pattern.

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

Saxon Brettell and Jim Basker

In a previous article, the authors suggested that surveys could usefully provide monitoring information for management of capital services in libraries, such as seating…

Abstract

In a previous article, the authors suggested that surveys could usefully provide monitoring information for management of capital services in libraries, such as seating, because of the complex interdependencies between users' behaviour and the provision of services reflecting a joint supply or joint demand relationship—or both. The authors then suggested a utilization quotient as an especially useful summary statistic for analysis and applied this to a particular survey of an academic library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Alan Saks and Jamie A. Gruman

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential effects of organizational socialization on organizational-level outcomes and to demonstrate that organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential effects of organizational socialization on organizational-level outcomes and to demonstrate that organizational socialization is an important human resource (HR) practice that should be included in research on strategic human resource management (SHRM) and should be part of a high-performance work system (HPWS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the research on SHRM and applies SHRM theory and the ability-motivation-opportunity model to explain how organizational socialization can influence organizational outcomes. The implications of psychological resource theories for newcomer adjustment and socialization are described and socialization resources theory is used to explain how organizational socialization can influence different indicators of newcomer adjustment.

Findings

An integration of SHRM theory and organizational socialization research indicates that organizational socialization can influence organizational outcomes (operational and financial) through newcomer adjustment (human capital, motivation, social capital, and psychological capital variables) and traditional socialization/HR outcomes such as job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job performance and reduced turnover.

Practical implications

In this paper the authors describe the socialization resources that organizations can use to facilitate newcomer adjustment to achieve newcomer and organizational outcomes.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to integrate the organizational socialization literature with SHRM theory and to explain how organizational socialization can influence organizational outcomes.

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