Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Weiling Zhuang, Barry J. Babin and Adilson Borges

The purpose of this study is to address the following research questions: How do customer input and service provider (in this study, the terms firm and service provider…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address the following research questions: How do customer input and service provider (in this study, the terms firm and service provider are used interchangeably) input coproduce customer experience and response? Do different components of customer input influence customer experience differently?

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling (SEM) was adopted to conduct tests of the measurement model and the main hypotheses represented in Figure 1. LISREL 8.80 (Jöreskog and Sörbom, 1993) was applied for data analysis in the current study. A survey instrument was designed and used to gather data for use in this study. Data were collected using an online survey administration tool (www.qualtrics.com).

Findings

The results indicate that two dimensions of customer participation – information resource and codeveloper activities – demonstrate distinct impacts on customers’ responses. Specifically, customer participation (information resource) is negatively related to customer shopping values and satisfaction. However, another dimension of customer participation (codeveloper activities) is positively related to the same outcomes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is among the first to integrate customer participation and customer orientation to understand the phenomenon of customer co-creation. The study applies for a two-dimensional customer input construct and empirically tests their impacts on customer experience. Both utilitarian value and hedonic value are included in the research framework to assess customer value experience.

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Diego Costa Pinto, Márcia Maurer Herter, Patrícia Rossi, Walter Meucci Nique and Adilson Borges

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive…

1408

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive altruism (status). Drawing on evolutionary altruism and identity-based motivation, the authors propose that a match between pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) identity goals enhance consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling (green buying).

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies show how pure and competitive altruism are associated with specific sustainable consumption (Study 1) and how altruism types should be matched with identity goals to motivate sustainable consumption (Studies 2 and 3).

Findings

Study 1 shows that pure altruism is associated with recycling but not with green buying. Studies 2 and 3 show that pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) goals lead to higher recycling (green buying) intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The present research extends previous findings by showing that pure and competitive are indeed associated with specific sustainable behaviors. The authors suggest that the interaction between motives and identity goals can lead to a greater impact on recycling and green buying intentions.

Practical implications

Public policymakers and companies will benefit by better understanding how specific combinations of altruism types and identity goals can foster recycling or green buying intentions.

Originality/value

This research is the first to show how matches between pure and competitive altruism types and individualistic and collectivistic identity goals affect consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling and green buying.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Adilson Borges, Barry J. Babin and Nathalie Spielmann

Evaluative processes made in retail environments have been shown to vary between groups, particularly between men and women. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate…

4397

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluative processes made in retail environments have been shown to vary between groups, particularly between men and women. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that a hedonic or utilitarian store atmosphere leads to different evaluations depending on the consumer's gender orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A pre‐test identifies hedonic and utilitarian store atmospheres. A main study uses an experimental design to compare the impact of these atmospheres on overall store quality, price perceptions and willingness to pay for products in these stores in function of the consumers' gender orientation.

Findings

The results show that hedonic atmospheres lead to higher quality perception, higher price perception and higher purchase intention among female‐oriented consumers. Moreover, female‐oriented consumers are willing to pay 32 per cent more for the same product when this product is offered in a hedonic store atmosphere. Retailers should consider carefully how store design affects evaluations among male versus female‐oriented consumers.

Research limitation/implications

The use of students reduces the generalisability of the results. Future research can test the propositions further.

Originality/value

The results suggest that perceptions of store atmospheres are moderated by gender orientation, which is a segmentation variable that may be more relevant in today's gender‐blurring retail environments. Furthermore, the results show how value can be perceived from store atmospheres and transferred to products.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Adilson Borges, Gérard Cliquet and André Fady

Even if a sales promotion attracts consumers to the store, the hi‐lo performance will be uncertain if these consumers buy only promoted categories. Retailers need to pay…

2374

Abstract

Purpose

Even if a sales promotion attracts consumers to the store, the hi‐lo performance will be uncertain if these consumers buy only promoted categories. Retailers need to pay attention to avoid promoting categories that are frequently bought together in the same promotional action, or be faced with a strong redundancy effect. This paper proposes a method to decrease redundancy effect without reducing overall promotion utility (and store traffic).

Design/methodology/approach

Three conjoint analyses were carried out, two based on promotional assortments composed by real product categories, and one based on attribute description.

Findings

The results suggest that grocery stores can avoid redundancy effects by introducing categories with weak conjoint probabilities, resulting in a higher share of full priced products on the consumer baskets without reducing the global utility of the promotion.

Research limitations/implications

Real promotion contains large number of category/brands, and we strongly recommend further research on this.

Practical implications

Retailers can propose promotional actions that increase store traffic and develop the price image of the store. By managing buying association, retailers can create more profitable promotions.

Originality/value

The idea of building promotions that take into account the redundancy effect as well as measuring its impact on consumer promotional value and store image are the main value of this research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Adilson Borges and Pierrick Gomez

The purpose of this paper is to test whether the simple exposure to different types of products can trigger different motivational orientation on consumers (prevention vs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether the simple exposure to different types of products can trigger different motivational orientation on consumers (prevention vs promotion), which in turn would match message frame and increase persuasion.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments test whether exposure to product categories can trigger consumer’s regulatory focus orientation. Participants in the pilot study are students, while participants in the two other studies are consumers.

Findings

A first pilot study randomly exposed participants to a product that could trigger promotion orientation (e.g. orange juice) versus a product that could trigger prevention orientation (e.g. sunscreen). Participants exposed to promotion (prevention) product suggest more promotion (prevention) strategies to reach a particular goal (preparing for their final exam). Study 2 shows that gain (vs loss)-framed messages using health appeals have better evaluations when featuring promotion (vs prevention) products. Study 3 generalizes these results using another sample and different product categories.

Research limitations/implications

The paper uses some product categories and including other categories would increase external validity.

Practical implications

The practical implication is to help marketers to choose the right health argument to match the product category they are trying to sell.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the results from three studies show that exposure to products can temporarily trigger a consumer’s regulatory focus and that messages using health arguments that are consistent with this regulatory focus are more persuasive than those that are not. Managerially, these results help managers to adapt the right message in function of the product category.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

337

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Seth Ketron, Rodney Runyan and M. Theodore Farris II

The current work reviews all retailing articles published in four prominent retailing journals – Journal of Retailing, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services

Abstract

Purpose

The current work reviews all retailing articles published in four prominent retailing journals – Journal of Retailing, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, and International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research – in the 2009-2015 period, picking up where Runyan and Hyun (2009) left off. The purpose of this paper is to identify leading authors and institutions in retailing research based on overall impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis/literature review/descriptive research.

Findings

In total, 1,392 articles were published during this time period, and through a procedure of weights and adjustments for author count, journal impact, journal quality, and journal publishing opportunity, the findings reveal that research collaboration is highly prevalent, as evidenced by the high number of multi-authored papers and cross-university/international partnerships. Additionally, some authors and institutions remain influential, while others have emerged as highly influential in the last seven years. This shows the dynamic nature of the field and the need to remain active in quality publishing.

Research limitations/implications

Scholars must understand that several factors influence impact judgments, which cannot be assessed using raw counts alone. Journal quality, impact, and publishing opportunity as well as author counts are important elements to consider.

Originality/value

These reviews are vital to the field in that they provide status updates on scholarship, so these reviews should be done periodically. Additionally, the findings in this paper provide a more holistic understanding of research impact and permit better assessment for scholars and administrators.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8