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Case study
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Adele Berndt

After having discussed the case, the reader will be able to analyse the dangers associated with product changes; contrast various strategic marketing issues that can be…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After having discussed the case, the reader will be able to analyse the dangers associated with product changes; contrast various strategic marketing issues that can be considered when implementing changes, including marketing communication and the use of social media; motivate an approach to customer complaints and comments on the launch of a new product; and comment on the ethical issues associated with new product launches.

Case overview/synopsis

Marketers are focused on satisfying customers’ needs, and no organisation would deliberately offend or alienate customers. Occasionally, organisations make decisions that anger customers as they do not understand the reasoning behind them. Sometimes, the decision is the correct one and once the company has clarified the reason behind it, the customer adjusts to the new situation. At other times, the consumer refuses to accept the decision and abandons the organisation or the specific product. This situation indicates some important negative outcomes for companies when making changes to product formulas. Social media allows customers to complain and comment, adding visibility to the situation. All these factors contribute to presenting management with a challenge in dealing with this situation, considering the needs of the company and balancing them with the customer reactions.

Complexity academic level

Third-year strategic marketing students MBA students (marketing courses)

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes (and necessary annexures) permissions.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2018

Miralem Helmefalk and Adele Berndt

Retail stores are required to provide a stimulating in-store experience for customers and do this by developing various strategies. One strategy implemented by retailers…

Abstract

Purpose

Retail stores are required to provide a stimulating in-store experience for customers and do this by developing various strategies. One strategy implemented by retailers is the use of sensory cues to encourage consumers to engage with the environment and the products on display and available for purchase. Conducted in a lighting department, the purpose of this paper is to consider how retailers can employ a multisensory cue, which is formed by combining three single cues to positively impact consumer behaviours – specifically time spent, touching and purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised an experimental design, which implemented single congruent visual, auditory and olfactory cues that formed a multisensory cue. Consumer behaviour outcomes of these cues were measured using objective measures.

Findings

The results show that a multisensory cue impacts time spent and purchasing, but no evidence of it affecting touching was noted. In the case of the single cues, auditory and scent cues impacted time spent, but their effect was not to the extent of the multisensory cue, which was superior.

Research limitations/implications

The study focussed on one product category within a general furnishing store, thus limiting the extent to which the findings can be generalised.

Practical implications

The effect of a multisensory cue exceeded that of single cues, emphasising the need for retailers to consider and develop a multisensory retail environment.

Originality/value

While research into the effect of single cues on consumer behaviours has shown positive effects, research into a multisensory cue, especially in a real-retail setting, is relatively scarce.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Adele Berndt, Daniel J. Petzer and Pierre Mostert

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into brand avoidance of service brands and explore whether the different types of brand avoidance identified in a product…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into brand avoidance of service brands and explore whether the different types of brand avoidance identified in a product context apply to service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the exploratory nature of the study, the critical incident method and semi-structured interviews were used to achieve the purpose of the study.

Findings

The findings suggest that five types of brand avoidance, as identified in studies involving product brands, can be identified as impacting service brands. In addition, the findings show that advertising avoidance should be expanded to communication avoidance because of the multifarious communication influences that were identified. The study proposes a framework to deepen the understanding of the types of brand avoidance affecting service brands.

Research limitations/implications

Since the different types of brand avoidance previously identified are also evident in a services environment, service providers should develop strategies to deal with the different types of service brand avoidance. The findings are broad in scope because of the exploratory nature of the study, and a detailed analysis of each type of service brand avoidance is still required.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the various types of brand avoidance and their manifestation in the services context. The study contributes by showing that the broader concept of communication, not only advertising, should be considered when studying brand avoidance in a service context.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Adele Berndt and Goran Svensson

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Adele Berndt and Jane P. Wayland

Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the readability of locally authored marketing research textbooks in South Africa and compare them with international (USA) texts.

Design/methodology/approach

South African marketing research textbooks (authored locally) used at South African institutions were identified. Electronic versions of the textbooks were used and analysed using accepted readability formulae. The same procedure was used with texts produced in the USA and the findings of each were compared.

Findings

The South Africa texts scored higher on the Flesch Reading Ease score than US texts, which links to the target audience of these books (undergraduate students), while also being cognisant of the reading skills of the target audience but their score still describes them as “difficult”.

Research limitations/implications

The original formulae and theory tend to be dated, though there are recent studies into readability in other areas of business studies. There are also those that question the applicability of readability formulae in the tertiary environment.

Practical implications

Instructors need to ensure that material is at a suitable reading level to maximise the student's learning. For publishers and authors, this means that the examples and illustrations used need to be linked to the context in which the student lives and functions, and not just focus on the English used in the text.

Originality/value

While studies have been conducted into the readability of US textbooks, there is little published research into the readability of regional marketing research textbooks in other contexts to facilitate comparison.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Magriet Holder and Adele Berndt

The aim of this research is to determine the effect of changes in servicescape on the service quality perceptions of maternity ward patients in a private hospital.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to determine the effect of changes in servicescape on the service quality perceptions of maternity ward patients in a private hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi‐experimental design was used. An experimental and control group (of patients) was surveyed before the changes in servicescape took place, and a further experimental and control group of patients was surveyed after changes in the servicescape. Each group was surveyed using a SERVPERF instrument to determine perceptions of service quality.

Findings

The changes in servicescape which took place in the experimental context resulted in a significant change in service quality perceptions among the experimental group. This change was not seen in all service quality dimensions, however, with statistical significance seen only in the tangible, reliability and responsiveness dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Four different groups of respondents took part in the quasi‐experiment (two experimental groups and two control groups) specifically in a medical setting, and the ability to generalise these findings needs to be investigated.

Practical implications

Management needs to take greater notice of the effect of servicescape, as well as any changes in the servicescape on the perceptions of service quality.

Originality/value

There is agreement that the servicescape affects perceptions of service quality and this study bears out this conclusion.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Adele Berndt, H.B. Klopper, Ilse Niemann‐Struweg and Corne Meintjes

The purpose of the study was to investigate the involvement and actions (co‐creation) of residents of South Africa prior to the commencement of the 2010 Soccer World Cup…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to investigate the involvement and actions (co‐creation) of residents of South Africa prior to the commencement of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, which was held in South Africa during June and July 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research was conducted in the three major metropolitan centres in South Africa, using a self‐completion questionnaire among residents in South Africa, using purposive sampling. The questionnaire consisted of two sections. Data collection was supervised by trained fieldworkers.

Findings

The responses of 1,352 respondents who took part indicate significant differences between the involvement of the genders, language groups and nationalities, while in the case of actions, significant differences were found between genders and income groups. The study also found an association between the involvement and actions in the case of this mega‐event.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted one month prior to the event, and those who had exhibited actions may have been predisposed to taking part in the event. Research was limited to three major centres in South Africa.

Practical implications

This has implications for the marketing of mega‐events in other countries as well as events other than sports events, specifically in the development of the marketing strategy associated with the event and more specifically the marketing communication strategy, focussed on attracting residents.

Originality/value

The importance of the study can be found in the scarcity of the literature that primarily investigates the role of residents in the co‐creation associated with a mega‐event.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Zana Knittel, Karolin Beurer and Adele Berndt

The purpose of this research is to explore the reasons for brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers. Researchers have traditionally focused on the positive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the reasons for brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers. Researchers have traditionally focused on the positive relationship between consumers and brands, but, increasingly, consumers are consciously avoiding brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study consisting of both focus groups and interviews was conducted among Generation Y participants.

Findings

The findings support previous research that identifies four types of brand avoidance, namely, experiential, identity, moral and deficit-value avoidance. However, the study also suggests that an additional type of brand avoidance, namely, advertising avoidance, also occurs. Aspects of advertising that can contribute to brand avoidance include the content of the advertising, the use of a celebrity endorser and the music in the advertising, as well as the response to the advertising. This study thus proposes an expanded framework of brand avoidance.

Research limitations/implications

This study has found support for the existing types and reasons impacting brand avoidance but suggests that advertising may also impact brand avoidance. This is an aspect that requires further research.

Practical implications

For marketing managers, the findings suggest that not only can product experiences result in brand avoidance, but that advertising may be a further reason for this phenomenon.

Originality/value

While there has been a great deal of attention on the positive aspects of brands, research on the negative aspects has largely been ignored. Further, the identification of advertising as a reason for brand avoidance is also suggested.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Lai Siu Mane David Lai Wai, Ashley Keshwar Seebaluck and Viraigyan Teeroovengadum

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the usage of information technology (IT) to support the various quality management (QM) processes through empirical analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the usage of information technology (IT) to support the various quality management (QM) processes through empirical analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has analysed in depth the data collected through questionnaire survey consisting of 180 ISO 9001:2000 certified organisations, so as to assess the impact of IT on the various QM dimensions. Factor analysis and other statistical analyses were carried out using the SPSS software.

Findings

It was found that IT does actually have a substantial impact on QM. Subsequently other analysis was conducted to understand better how IT actually impacts on QM and to investigate the situation in Mauritius through a comparative study, such as between manufacturing and services firms, among others.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope to assess in more depth the impact of IT on QM by conducting case studies, in support of this empirical study and there is scope also to go more in depth in this research by analysing the usage of IT in specific QM tasks and IT applications.

Originality/value

This research has empirically demonstrated the impact of IT on the different QM processes; it is thus hoped that it will contribute by increasing awareness of the actual importance of IT in the success of QM initiatives and encourage intelligent investment in IT which is geared towards effective use in supporting QM processes.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Claude‐Hélene Mayer and Lynette Louw

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate insights into cross‐cultural conflict, identity and values amongst selected managers within a South African management context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate insights into cross‐cultural conflict, identity and values amongst selected managers within a South African management context. It aims to increase the understanding of these complexities from an academic managerial perspective, thereby providing in‐depth information which can lead to the development of managerial training tools for improving diversity and conflict management in the described context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors selected qualitative data from a case study that was conducted in the international South African automotive industry. The case study was based on the post‐modernist premise by considering phenomenological and interpretative paradigms most relevant.

Findings

Findings show conflicts in managerial communication and treatment, position and competition, organisation, race and gender and are often defined as “cross‐racial” conflict fuelled by the society's past.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability is limited to this specific context and needs to be proven by follow‐up studies which expand the context and the methodological approach of the study.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions address the implementation of training tools, coaching and counselling in cross‐cultural conflict management. They are anticipated to create awareness on managing the present challenges and are aimed at managers and international organisations investing in South Africa.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights into the discussion on human resource management in a specific South African management context by referring to the highly important topics of cross‐cultural conflict, values and identities.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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