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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Lamia Haque and Robert Rosenheck

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD and

Abstract

Purpose

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD and SUD who receive mental health and addiction treatment or correlates of such use.

Design/methodology/approach

Using national Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 data from the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the authors studied all 43,246 veterans diagnosed with both LD and SUD in FY 2012 and compared those who received mental health treatment (n = 30,456; 70.4%) to those who did not (n = 12,790; 29.6%).

Findings

Veterans who received mental health treatment were less like to be older than 75 years of age, more likely to have served during recent Middle East conflicts (Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom), more likely to have been recently homeless and to have drug dependence as contrasted with alcohol dependence when compared with those who did not receive mental health treatment. Although the majority, 70.4%, received mental health treatment, only 30.6% of the total received specialized addiction treatment, and these veterans were more likely to experience homelessness and have drug dependence diagnoses.

Originality/value

This is the first study as per the authors’ best knowledge that broadly examines mental health and addiction treatment received by veterans with LD and SUD. High rates of mental health treatment in this population likely reflect the integrated nature of the VHA and its emphasis on providing comprehensive services to homeless veterans. Further research is needed to identify barriers to specialized addiction treatment in this population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Líam MacGabhann, Angela Moore and Carol Moore

This paper provides an historical perspective on dual diagnosis and current developments in the delivery of mental health and addiction services to people with dual…

Abstract

This paper provides an historical perspective on dual diagnosis and current developments in the delivery of mental health and addiction services to people with dual diagnosis in Ireland. In light of government policy, it describes attempts made to improve the standards of care provided, recognising deficits in services, and not just those services provided to clients with a dual diagnosis. It identifies a number of issues that need to be addressed, including training, research, service developments, co‐operation between different service providers, information availability and measurement of client outcomes. It concludes that, although there is increasing awareness of the issue of dual diagnosis, this has not resulted in significant relevant policy implementation and improvements in services provided to clients with a dual diagnosis. Yet there is sufficient evidence available for a meaningful response to dual diagnosis, given the state of play in policy and service delivery in those settings with which people with dual diagnosis engage.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Larry Davidson, Arthur C. Evans, Ijeoma Achara-Abrahams and William White

Despite the high prevalence of co-occurring disorders and the need for systems of care to integrate mental health and addiction services, integration remains a challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the high prevalence of co-occurring disorders and the need for systems of care to integrate mental health and addiction services, integration remains a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to address this challenge by focussing on shared processes of recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing commonalities between mental health and substance use recovery, integration of treatment with recovery supports under the rubric of a “recovery-oriented system of care” is described. Philadelphia's Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services is then used as an example to illustrate strategies for achieving two forms of integration: mental health and addiction and treatment and recovery supports.

Findings

Viewed through the lens of people with mental health and addiction challenges, the services and supports that promote recovery are very similar. One of the common themes that emerged was the need for these services to go beyond helping people manage their symptoms or achieve abstinence, to also helping them to rebuild their lives in their communities. In addition to co-location and increased collaboration, service providers must possess common values, a consistent approach, and a shared vision for the people they serve.

Practical implications

Systems need to find innovative and effective ways to integrate recovery support services with treatment and other interventions, hopefully transforming existing services in the process.

Originality/value

In the process of developing a truly integrated behavioral health system, a shared vision across all sectors of the system must shift away from the field's historical focus on illness and problems to a new focus on strengths and possibilities.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Lorenzo Pelizza, Ursula Zambelli, Enrico Rossi, Germana Verdoliva, Davide Maestri, Ilaria De Amicis, Cecilia Paraggio, Amir Zaimovic, Bruno Veneri, Beatrice Urbani, Diana Gran Dall'Olio, Adriana Adriani, Stefania Cutrino, Silvia Bertoli, Giuseppina Paulillo and Pietro Pellegrini

Mental health interventions for Italian prisoners with mental disorders remain a problematic issue, despite radical changes in general psychiatric care and a 2008 major…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health interventions for Italian prisoners with mental disorders remain a problematic issue, despite radical changes in general psychiatric care and a 2008 major government reform transferring mental health care in prison to the National Health Service. The aim of this study is to describe the mental health intervention model implemented since January 2020 for prisoners allocated in the Parma Penitentiary Institutes (PPI). This approach is specifically based on specialized, “person-centered” and “person-tailored” therapeutic-rehabilitation plans in line with psychiatric treatments usually provided in community mental health-care centers of the Parma Department of Mental Health.

Design/methodology/approach

All the processes and procedures included in the PPI intervention model were first carefully illustrated, paying special attention to the service for newly admitted prisoners and each typology of specialized therapeutic-rehabilitation treatment potentially provided. Additionally, a preliminary descriptive process analysis of the first six months of clinical activity was also performed.

Findings

Since January 2020, 178 individuals entered the PPI service for newly admitted prisoners. In total, 83 (46.7%) of them were engaged in the services of the PPI mental health-care team (35 with pathological addiction and 48 with mental disorders): 56 prisoners were offered an integrated mental health intervention and 27 exclusively an individual psychological or psychiatric treatment.

Originality/value

The results support the potential applicability of an integrated mental health intervention in prison, planning a person-tailored rehabilitation in close collaboration with the prisoners, their families and the local mental health/social services.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Akwatu Khenti, Jaime C. Sapag, Consuelo Garcia‐Andrade, Fernando Poblete, Ana Raquel Santiago de Lima, Andres Herrera, Pablo Diaz, Henok Amare, Avra Selick and Sandra Reid

Since 2002, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Ontario, Canada, has been working closely with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to implement…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2002, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Ontario, Canada, has been working closely with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to implement mental health capacity‐building focused on primary health care. From an equity perspective, this article seeks to critically analyze the process and key results of this capacity‐building effort and to identify various implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis of capacity‐building approaches is based on a critical review of existing documents such as needs assessments and evaluation reports, as well as reflective discussion. Previous health equity literature is used as a framework for analysis.

Findings

More than 1,000 professionals have been engaged in various kinds of training in Chile, Peru, Brazil, Nicaragua, Mexico, and Trinidad and Tobago. These capacity‐building initiatives have had an impact on primary health care from both an equity and systems perspective because participants were engaged at all stages of the process and implementation lessons incorporated into the final efforts. Stigma was also reduced through the collaborations.

Originality/value

Using concrete examples of capacity‐building in mental primary healthcare in LAC, as well as evidence gathered from the literature, this article demonstrates how primary healthcare can play a strong role in addressing health equity and human rights protection for people with mental health and/or substance abuse problems.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Mark S. Rosenbaum and IpKin Anthony Wong

This paper aims to show how instant messaging (IM) service providers are helping and hindering societal mental health among young adults. That is, IM services provide…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how instant messaging (IM) service providers are helping and hindering societal mental health among young adults. That is, IM services provide users with an ability to obtain instantaneous and inexpensive support in their time of need. However, excessive internet usage may place IM users at risk of experiencing symptoms associated with internet addiction and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a framework obtained from coding qualitative data. They test the framework with structural equation methodology and latent mean analysis from data collected from younger‐aged Chinese and American IM users in two studies.

Findings

Younger‐aged IM users in both China and the US obtain social support from their virtual networks. However, both groups of IM users show signs of elevated levels of internet addiction and of being at risk of experiencing symptoms associated with ADHD.

Research limitations/implications

Excessive IM and internet usage may hinder young adults' mental health, and the problem is likely to grow in the future. The work confirms recent trends in US psychology to consider internet addiction a mental health disorder.

Social implications

Both service and public health researchers are encouraged to consider the impact of technological services, including internet usage and IM, on consumer health and well‐being. People with ADHD are particularly susceptible to internet addiction; thus, technological services may be damaging society's mental health.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates how researchers can engage in transformative service research, referring to research with implications that affect global consumer health and well‐being. The work also shows a “dark side” to services and the unintended consequences of service technology on public health. Both topics have not been explored in service research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Annemarie Wille and Barry Nixon

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this…

Abstract

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this article, the author describes how New Zealand has begun to build on models developed from the UK and elsewhere to attend to workforce issues in the child and adolescent mental health and addictions sector. The workforce planning development model being implemented by the Werry Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health has a solid pedigree, with a very New Zealand focused process for implementation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Patrick Coyne

This paper considers future developments for Addictions Nursing. The aim of this paper is to provide a personal vision of two possible developments for Addictions Nurses…

Abstract

This paper considers future developments for Addictions Nursing. The aim of this paper is to provide a personal vision of two possible developments for Addictions Nurses, which will promote greater global working and improve the care received by service users and communities. The paper addresses the threats to public health posed by substance misuse, the wide number of diverse roles nurses undertake in addressing the problems which arise, and makes a number of suggestions about the development of nursing to maximise its impact on public health. The paper makes a number of recommendations:▪ promote international collaboration to develop the effectiveness of Addictions Nurses — by the strategic use of Work‐Based Learning and Rotation Schemes via ‘The Spiral of Excellence Model of Rotation Schemes’ (www.nurserotation.com)▪ promote international collaboration to develop Addiction Nurse prescribing using the ‘ABC Model of Addictions Nurse Prescribing’▪ Network Addictions Nurse Organisations — use the ‘AMM‐IN’ model of working, and support the work of The International Network of Nurses (TINN) Interested in Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Misuse (www.tinnurses.org)▪ actively influence ICN, WHO, UN to promote public health approaches to substance misuse▪ promote service user and carer involvement in decision‐making▪ challenge the ‘divide and conquer’ approach to substance misuse — ‘tobacco, alcohol or drugs model of disease promotion yet again’ ie the ‘TAD‐DPY’ approach▪ actively challenge short‐termism in strategic workforce development, and in particular the ‘AM‐HRD’ model of human resource development.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Stephen Parker, Frances Dark, Gabrielle Vilic, Karen McCann, Ruth O'Sullivan, Caroline Doyle and Bernice Lendich

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through…

Abstract

Purpose

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through meaningful integration of peer support and clinical workers within rehabilitation teams. Key features include the majority of roles within the team being held by persons with a lived experience of mental illness, the active collaboration between peer and clinical workers throughout all stages of a consumer’s rehabilitation journey, and an organizational structure that legitimizes and emphasizes the importance of peer work within public mental health service delivery. This staffing model is not anticipated to alter the core rehabilitation function and service models.

Design/methodology/approach

The emergence of the integrated staffing model is described with reference to the policy and planning context, the evidence base for peer support, and the organizational setting. A conceptual and contextualized description of the staffing model in practice as compared to a traditional clinical staffing model is provided.

Findings

There is a potential for synergistic benefits through the direct collaboration between horizontally integrated peer and clinical specialists within a unified team working toward a common goal. This staffing model is novel and untested, and will be subjected to ongoing evaluation.

Originality/value

The integrated staffing model may provide a pathway to achieving valued and valuable roles for peer workers working alongside clinical staff in providing rehabilitation support to people affected by serious mental illness.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Peter McGeorge

The aim of the paper is to describe the “organisational lifecycle” of the New Zealand Mental Health Commission (NZ MHC) including factors that led to it being established…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to describe the “organisational lifecycle” of the New Zealand Mental Health Commission (NZ MHC) including factors that led to it being established, the evolving phases of the work it undertook and its key achievements, the critical success factors, the rationale behind its disestablishment and transfer of its core functions to another entity.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a review of relevant documents and interviews of previous Commissioners, and insights of the final two Chair Commissioners and authors.

Findings

The NZ MHC was established to provide government with independent advice on how to develop the capacity and capability of mental health and addictions services for those people with the highest and most complex needs, estimated to be approximately 3 percent of the population. Having successfully led changes to achieve this goal as set out in The Blueprint of 1998 it is now influencing government policy and services to achieve better mental health and well‐being for the whole population as per Blueprint II, published in 2012. The NZ Government clearly values the role of Mental Health Commissioner which has been transferred to the Office of the Health and Disability Commissioner from July 2012 at the time the Commission is disestablished.

Research limitations/implications

The paper relies on insights of those in Commission leadership roles.

Practical implications

Other Commissions may gain insight into their own evolutionary pathways and proactively manage them.

Social implications

Optimal mental health and wellbeing for society requires policy that simultaneously takes a “whole of society” approach and focuses on responding to people with the highest needs.

Originality/value

The paper shows that there are significant concerns about the disestablishment of the Mental Health Commission in New Zealand and little understanding of the underlying rationale for the organisational changes.

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