Search results

1 – 10 of over 32000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Kuppanan Palanisami, Krishna Reddy Kakumanu, C.R. Ranganathan and Nagothu Udaya Sekhar

Researchers and policymakers are figuring out the adaptation technologies to cope with the changing climate. Adaptation strategies for crop production followed by the…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers and policymakers are figuring out the adaptation technologies to cope with the changing climate. Adaptation strategies for crop production followed by the farmers at selected study locations had ranged from 6-30 per cent only, and this was mainly due to lack of awareness about the actual cost associated with adaptation and non-adaptation of these strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Hence, this study aims to address the cost of adaptation for rice using joint probability distribution of rainfall and crop prices.

Findings

Cost of adaptation varied from INR2,389 to 4,395/ha for System of Rice Intensification (SRI); INR646 to 1,121/ha for alternate wetting and drying (AWD) and INR8,144 to 8,677/ha for well irrigation (WI), whereas expected cost for not using these technologies has ranged from INR6,976 to 9,172/ha for SRI; INR4,123 7,764/ha for AWD and INR10,825 to 17,270/ha for WI. Hence, promotion of the adaptation technologies itself will minimize the income losses to the farmers.

Research limitations/implications

Even though, there are many ways for farmers (other than technology), to adapt to climate change (such as out-migration to cities, selling farm assets, focus on children’s education, etc.), this report, given the framework of the major research study undertaken, addresses only farm-level adaptation of the technologies to enhance farm income.

Originality/value

Public–private partnership in providing the technologies at cheaper costs, capacity building in handling the technologies and creating awareness about the technologies to minimize the expected cost of adaptation are suggested to improve the adoption level.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Technology Takers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-463-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Monirul Azam

The purpose of this study is to evaluate to what extent the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have supported (or could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate to what extent the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have supported (or could support) the least developed countries (LDCs) particularly for accessing the climate technologies and thereby to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted legal dogmatism to evaluate the gradual development of technology transfer issues to support the LDCs under the international climate regime.

Findings

This study suggested a few potential measures to facilitate meaningful technology transfer to LDCs – such as clarifying and linking the role of the technology and financial mechanism, a more robust role of capacity building, using the sustainable development mechanism with a technology transfer focus, improving the transparency and reporting mechanism to particularly indicate support regarding technology transfer requested and received by the LDCs linking it with the nationally determined contributions, and adapting a pragmatic approach to intellectual property.

Originality/value

This study is an original contribution as it identified concern over technology transfer under the UNFCCC since 1992 with a focus on the LDCs and indicated required actions that need to be taken to support the LDCs in the context of climate-related technology transfer and beyond.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Joby John and Ramendra Thakur

This paper aims to propose an approach to examining the long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on business, which presents a unique opportunity to study a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an approach to examining the long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on business, which presents a unique opportunity to study a hitherto-unavailable business scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is suggested to study the ability of a service firm to make adaptations to pandemic conditions based on the nature of its services: namely, the act of production and the type of recipient and the predisposed ability of the customer to accept the service firm’s adaptations to social distancing restrictions. Under this framework, it is demonstrated that service adaptations made due to COVID-19 business restrictions and the customers’ acceptance of them determine whether these changes are likely to become permanent.

Findings

A classification scheme is developed to determine four classes of service firms’ adaptations to their normal course of business made under pandemic conditions and suggestions given on how to project which adaptations may persist beyond the pandemic and why.

Research limitations/implications

A conceptual framework grounded on Lovelock classification to present projections needs to be empirically tested.

Practical implications

Managerial insights based on the study and suggestions for research on what business practices are most likely to be permanently changed in a post-pandemic world for services are offered.

Originality/value

Using two of Lovelock’s dimensions pertaining to the nature of production and delivery of the service, four categories are proposed based on two characteristics: service adaptability and customer acceptance. The Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2) model is extended to predict service adaptations, which are most likely to become permanent in a post-pandemic world.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Simon Korwin Milewski, Kiran Jude Fernandes and Matthew Paul Mount

Technological process innovation (TPI) is a distinctive organizational phenomenon characterized by a firm-internal locus and underlying components such as mutual adaptation

Abstract

Purpose

Technological process innovation (TPI) is a distinctive organizational phenomenon characterized by a firm-internal locus and underlying components such as mutual adaptation of new technology and existing organization, technological change, organizational change, and systemic impact. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the management of these components at different stages of the innovation lifecycle (ILC) in large manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an exploratory case-based research design and conduct a multiple case study of five large successful manufacturing companies operating in different industries in Germany. The authors build the study on 55 semi-structured interviews, which yielded 91.5 hours of recorded interview data. The authors apply cross-case synthesis and replication logic to identify patterns of how companies address process innovation components at different ILC stages.

Findings

The study uncovers the content of four central TPI components across the ILC and identifies differences between the development of core and non-core processes. Based on the findings the authors describe asymmetric adaptation as a theoretical construct and propose that companies seek different levels of process standardization depending on the type of process they develop, which in turn affects whether there is a greater extent of technological or organizational change.

Practical implications

Awareness of existing structures, processes, and technologies, as well as their value in relation to the company’s core and non-core operations is imperative to determining the adequate structure of mutual adaptation.

Originality/value

The authors provide detailed insight on the management of mutual adaptation, technological, and organizational change, as well as systemic impact at the different stages of the ILC. The authors extend prior research by adopting an ILC perspective for the investigation of these four TPI components and by proposing a construct of asymmetric adaptation to capture key mechanisms of process development and implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Krishna Reddy Kakumanu, Palanisami Kuppanan, C.R. Ranganathan, Kumar Shalander and Haileslassie Amare

Changing climate has increasingly become a challenge for smallholder farmers. Identification of technical, institutional and policy interventions as coping and adaptation

Abstract

Purpose

Changing climate has increasingly become a challenge for smallholder farmers. Identification of technical, institutional and policy interventions as coping and adaptation strategies and exploring risks of their adoption for smallholder farms are the important areas to consider. The aim of the present study was to carry out an in-depth analysis of adaptation strategies followed and the associated risk premium in technology adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out in the dryland systems of three Indian states – Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Rajasthan – and was based on a survey of 1,019 households in 2013. The flexible moment-based approach was used for estimating the stochastic production function, which allowed estimation of the relative risk premium that farmers are willing to pay while adopting the technologies to avoid crop production risks.

Findings

In all the three states, the risk premium (INR ha−1) was higher for farm mechanization compared to supplemental irrigation, except in the case of Andhra Pradesh. The higher the level of technology adoption, the higher the risk premium that households have to pay. This can be estimated by the higher investment needed to build infrastructure for farm mechanization and supplemental irrigation in the regions. The key determinants of technology adoption in the context of smallholder farmers were climatic shocks, investment in farm infrastructure, location of the farm, farm size, household health status, level of education, married years, expected profit and livestock ownership.

Originality/value

Quantification of the risk premium in technology adoption and conducting associated awareness programs for farmers and decision-makers are important to strengthen evidence-based adoption decisions in the dryland systems of India.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Per Lindberg

Asks how implementation management affects implementationuncertainty, adaptation cycles and performance. Assesses retrospectivecase studies of three Swedish FMS…

Abstract

Asks how implementation management affects implementation uncertainty, adaptation cycles and performance. Assesses retrospective case studies of three Swedish FMS implementation processes. The cases represent technically similar systems, but with different project characteristics and degrees of success. Reports the study of timing and source of latent uncertainty variables, where uncertainties are regarded as being caused by misalignments in technology, organization, management and strategy. Also studies the timing and nature of adaptation cycles.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Per Lindberg

Develops a framework for the implementation and adaptation of flexiblemanufacturing systems, paying particular attention to the uncertaintyinvolved in implementation…

Abstract

Develops a framework for the implementation and adaptation of flexible manufacturing systems, paying particular attention to the uncertainty involved in implementation. Discusses the subsystems associated with technology, management and strategic control, with technology being split into operations, materials and knowledge and relates latent uncertainty to the almost inevitable misalignment of the various factors and comments on the adaptation cycles needed for successful implementation. Presents three case studies to illustrate the points made.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Technology Takers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-463-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Arild Wæraas

This paper compares the research traditions of organizational translation studies and adaptation studies. The purpose of this paper is to identify differences and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper compares the research traditions of organizational translation studies and adaptation studies. The purpose of this paper is to identify differences and similarities in how these traditions approach the study of change in adopted constructs, and by doing so, provide a better understanding of each and how they can inform research into the connection between collective learning and the continuous transformation of circulating constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual in that it discusses, critiques and compares other authors’ work and thinking. It also has similarities with a literature review in that it draws out the main tendencies of many scholarly contributions from translation and adaptation literatures, respectively.

Findings

Although the paper identifies differences between translation and adaptation literatures concerning their basic assumptions, it also calls for better integration of the insights provided by them. It argues that both are needed to better understand the learning aspects involved in the transformation of circulating constructs.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to compare translation studies with adaptation studies and to call for better integration of these literatures to better understand the change in circulating constructs.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 32000