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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Collence Takaingenhamo Chisita and Madelien C. Fombad

Knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation is key to reducing vulnerabilities. The disastrous effects of the recent tropical cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation is key to reducing vulnerabilities. The disastrous effects of the recent tropical cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe’s eastern highlands, whereby lives and livelihoods were destroyed, calls for fundamental rethinking on how knowledge sharing can be useful in reducing vulnerabilities. This study aims to examine how knowledge sharing practices among selected climate action organisations can support positive results in evidence-based climate change adaptation in Zimbabwe and recommends a strategy to enhance knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher opted for a qualitative research methodology, and interviews were conducted with research participants to get in-depth information. The target population for the research is drawn from three climate change organisations in Zimbabwe. These participants were chosen because of their direct involvement in climate change adaptation and mitigation. Purposive sampling was used because it was considered an easy and informal method to reach the target population. The responses were coded and readied for analysis. Categories for analysis were also determined and described. The next section focuses on the presentation and interpretation of the responses.

Findings

The study found out that even though there is evidence of knowledge sharing in the selected organisations, there was a need for a strategy that integrates the efforts of all climate action organisation to realise successful climate change adaptation. Successful climate change adaptation requires an integrative force in the form of a strategy that supports knowledge sharing. The strategy breaks the silo mode of operation by bringing together all stakeholders through knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The research study was unique to the Zimbabwean climate change and adaptation context and only a purposive sampling of participants representing three climate change action was feasible.

Social implications

The proposed model will enhance knowledge sharing among climate change and adaptation organisations in Zimbabwe. It will transform knowledge management practices among climate change organisations in Zimbabwe.

Originality/value

The study recommends a knowledge sharing strategy that can be useful in supporting climate change adaptation. The model will support decision-making by providing access to shareable information on climate change. The proposed knowledge sharing strategy integrates the efforts of all stakeholders, including communities, government and academia, among many. The study proposes an original model for climate change adaptation for Zimbabwe.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Wike Agustin Prima Dania, Ke Xing and Yousef Amer

This paper aims to evaluate the collaboration quality performance of sugar company Z and its stakeholders (farmers and distributors) by considering the sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the collaboration quality performance of sugar company Z and its stakeholders (farmers and distributors) by considering the sustainability aspects. This assessment shall be able to integrate qualitative and quantitative factors in the model, which is critical in sugar supply chains involving multi-stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Integration of quality function deployment (QFD), the fuzzy analytical network process (FANP) and the data envelopment analysis (DEA) is administered to assess the efficiency score of each stakeholder involved. The evaluation encompasses collaboration behaviour factors since the input of collaboration activities will result in sustainability aspects such as revenue, green house gas (GHG) emissions and social impact. The analysis has been conducted in two scenarios, those are the basic scenario by utilising original data and the extended scenario by using projection data.

Findings

The result clarifies that the most influential behaviour factor in the collaboration activities is commitment (0.116), while the least important behaviour factors are power (0.008) and adaptation (0.008). Furthermore, by using the extended scenario, the overall efficiency for each benchmarking is higher compared to the condition before the improvement (basic scenario).

Research limitations/implications

The result of this study is only relevant to the particular sugar supply chain and involving limited sustainability variables. Therefore, in a further study, more variables such as technical and financial aspects could be explored further in the assessment process.

Practical implications

The result of this study is available for each stakeholder and can be fundamental for the constant improvement in sustainable supply chain (SSC) practices. It shows that an improvement of one stakeholder will positively impact the entire system.

Social implications

Smallholders and sugarcane farmers will recognise the significance of collaboration behaviour. Thus, they can enhance their mutual benefits by using the existing resources.

Originality/value

This paper arranges for a practical contribution by implementing advanced assessment methods in the sugar supply chain by taking into account the economic, environmental and social aspects. This comprehensive assessment process in the sugar supply chain is the novelty of this paper.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Fu Jia and Richard Lamming

Inter‐firm learning, or dyadic learning, has been studied extensively in recent years: however very little attention has been devoted to extending the concept to an…

Abstract

Purpose

Inter‐firm learning, or dyadic learning, has been studied extensively in recent years: however very little attention has been devoted to extending the concept to an international context and no formal definition exists. The purpose of this paper is to propose “cultural adaptation” as a special form of international dyadic learning and link it to supply relationship performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were conducted in four Chinese‐Western buyer‐supplier relationships, providing cross‐case replication, employing qualitative and quantitative methods. Data were triangulated by questionnaires, semi‐structured interviews, and documentation.

Findings

Qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that cultural adaptation can lead to mutual benefits (relationship rents) and inbound spillover rents for both parties in a supply relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Using four cases and a small sample of key informants completing the questionnaire limits generalisability of findings.

Practical implications

The paper develops the causal relationship between cultural adaptation and mutual benefits motivating managers to adapt culturally. It emphasizes that the current relationship performance measures should include guanxi quality in order to adapt to the Chinese context.

Originality/value

Building on extended resource based theory, stating that strategic resources may lie beyond a firm's boundary and that relational and inbound spillover rents may be obtained from the relationship, the research contributes to dyadic or inter‐organisational learning literature by empirically building causal relationships between cultural adaptation (as a form of international dyadic learning) and associated mutual benefits (relational and inbound spillover rents), using multiple data sources and methods and tentatively redefining the dyadic learning concept.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Yanping Fang and Hongyan Wang

A first post-WALS attempt at a thematic analysis of the conference presentations since its first annual meeting in 2007, this paper aims to achieve two major purposes…

Abstract

Purpose

A first post-WALS attempt at a thematic analysis of the conference presentations since its first annual meeting in 2007, this paper aims to achieve two major purposes: first, to capture the trends of spread and diffusion of lesson and learning studies globally and second, to draw useful implications for future conferences.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic analysis using NVIVO12.0 coding on all forms of conference presentations found in the WALS 2019 Conference Programme was conducted. Representative cases were selected from paper and symposiums sessions to support the claims generated from the analysis.

Findings

The study provides an evidence-based confirmation of the global spread and diffusion of lesson and learning studies. It uncovers findings key to the initial spread and continued diffusion; examines funding as a mechanism enabling university–school research relationships, models of adaptations and issues of sustainability; surfaces the theoretical models and methods adopted in paper and symposia presentations. The current situation, lessons learned and possible implications for future WALS conferences are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Inform research on practical cases.

Practical implications

Lessons learned are discussed.

Social implications

These are possible implications for future WALS conferences.

Originality/value

The originality lies in its being the first WALS post-conference analysis aiming at identifying substantive themes with potential to draw important implications for future research and subsequent years' conferences.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Miwa Kato

Climate change was identified as an urgent global problem that requires governments to unite their efforts to prepare for potential climate risks at the First World…

Abstract

Climate change was identified as an urgent global problem that requires governments to unite their efforts to prepare for potential climate risks at the First World Climate Conference in 1979. This recognition led to the establishment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1988 to assess the magnitude and timing of changes and estimate their impacts. The IPCC published its First Assessment Report in 1990, which became a basis for negotiations on a climate change convention under the United Nations General Assembly. Between February 1991 and May 1992, the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for a Framework Convention on Climate Change met five times under the auspices of the General Assembly, and the Convention text was adopted on May 9, 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where 154 states signed. The Convention entered into force on March 21, 1994. It has near universal membership with 194 Parties (member countries) having ratified (UNFCCC, 2006).

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: Issues and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-487-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Beat Hans Wafler and Fredric Swierczek

This paper seeks to consider the impact of psychic, cultural and institutional distance, the adaptation of international joint ventures and the performance of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to consider the impact of psychic, cultural and institutional distance, the adaptation of international joint ventures and the performance of international companies entering an emerging economy. It is also a critique of the dominant quantitative approach to analyzing distance in international business.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a comparative case study using a grounded theory approach of six companies who entered Vietnam from 1986 until the present. A total of 20 international executives were interviewed representing different phases from start-up, implementation to the current situation.

Findings

In comparison to other empirical studies on entry strategy and distance, this research finds that executives involved in entry do not consider established theories such as transaction costs. The resource-based approach is considered but from a practical view. Despite the considerable cultural and institutional distance between the European cultures and the Vietnamese values, these international ventures have managed to close the distance. This contradicts the findings of many quantitative studies on this issue.

Research limitations/implications

This study is qualitative. It depends on the perceptions of international executives over a 25 year period. Only a few of the Vietnamese counterparts are included in this study.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the importance of adaptation overtime for the success of international ventures.

Originality/value

A long term qualitative study including executives from six major international companies and executives over such a longtime is rare. Using the grounded theory process in this research context is also unique.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Fu Jia and Christine Rutherford

This paper aims to add a cultural‐relational dimension to the supply chain risk management (SCRM) literature.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to add a cultural‐relational dimension to the supply chain risk management (SCRM) literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Inter‐firm learning and cultural adaptation literatures are reviewed, missing themes identified and a conceptual model proposed.

Findings

The authors define the problem of supply chain relational risk (SCRR) and explain the cultural differences between China and the West, which form a subset of SCRR. They then propose cultural adaptation as the solution to this problem. Two missing themes are identified concerning the process of cultural adaptation between China and the West and the causal relationship between cultural adaptation and partnership performance.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper based on secondary data.

Practical implications

Cultural differences between China and the West impact the relational risks facing Western buyers and their Chinese suppliers. To create a mutually beneficial partnership, it is necessary for both parties to understand the cultural differences and the process of cultural adaptation. Ultimately, the paper will help firms mitigate the relational risks associated with cultural differences.

Originality/value

The paper extends prior work in the area of SCRM by adding a relational‐cultural dimension. With a view to mitigation of SCRRs, the authors develop a conceptual process model, which describes a relationship‐building process incorporating cultural adaptation for the creation of a mutually beneficial partnership, which features a hybrid cultural interface.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Marek Michalski, Jose-Luis Montes-Botella and Ram Narasimhan

This paper aims to examine the non-linear aspects of the relationship between asymmetry and performance in supply chains (SCs), under varying intensities of collaboration

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the non-linear aspects of the relationship between asymmetry and performance in supply chains (SCs), under varying intensities of collaboration and integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a useful new approach to designing strategic elements of supply chain management (SCM) relationships. Using the partial least squares method, an empirical study of 66 companies in Spain has been conducted to clarify contemporary relationships, suggest new directions and ultimately contribute toward developing SCM theory.

Findings

The influences of asymmetry on performance in varying collaboration and integration contexts are shown to be unstable and have non-linear paths. It is inappropriate for all firms to collaborate or integrate continually, even for a prescribed period. Furthermore, due to asymmetry, SCM processes are more complex.

Research limitations/implications

The results’ validity may be limited to contexts specific to Spanish SCs. It would be valuable to investigate the impact of asymmetry on firms’ performance and relationships in other markets.

Practical implications

Collaborations and integration between partners in a SC might change the role of asymmetry from restraining to improving performance. The best way to improve performance in asymmetric relationships is to collaborate. Certain dimensions of integration and full integration are not necessarily required to improve firms’ performance under asymmetry conditions.

Originality/value

The study adds a new viewpoint on SCM by suggesting that not all collaboration and integration developments lead directly to improved performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Luis Fernando Morales-Alzate, Clara Solano-Vanegas, Angela Carrillo-Ramos, Jairo Montoya-Torres, Ramon Fabregat and Jaime A. Pavlich-Mariscal

This paper aims to present Accomm a software implementation of Ágora-SN, a supply network (SN) customer-oriented model integrated with an Adaptation Model. Accomm serves…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present Accomm a software implementation of Ágora-SN, a supply network (SN) customer-oriented model integrated with an Adaptation Model. Accomm serves two purposes: as an experimental validation tool to measure the impact of Adaptation on an agribusiness SN model and as a logistic and marketing operations planning assistant.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of Accomm is based on the results of the Ágora-SN model that comprises the following tasks: to characterize the SN actors’ processes ( composed of multiple first-tier suppliers, a focal company and multiple first-tier customers), identifying the ones oriented to the customer; to integrate these processes into a SN model which incorporates a supplier cooperation model; and to provide an adaptation model that implements a customer profile and a context profile to improve order fulfillment.

Findings

To validate the Ágora-SN model, a prototype Accomm was created referred to a real Colombian agribusiness sector company, specifically in the floriculture sector. This prototype was validated through two methods: a usability scale and a set of scenarios that compared the application’s behavior with and without adaptation and cooperation. The application provides a better response to demand when both adaptation and cooperation are enabled.

Research limitations/implications

This work was tested in an academic environment and was validated by different experts. Further tests in operational real-life environments are required to fully validate the approach.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this work is the integration of Adaptation into a SN model as a way to center the SN toward the customer. As an additional contribution, the validation tool Accomm is conceived as an operational planning tool for agribusiness SN.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Ki-Hyun Um and Jae-Young Oh

This study seeks: (1) to identify whether the form of governance adopted (relational or contractual) drives suppliers' and buyers' collaboration in the same way; (2) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks: (1) to identify whether the form of governance adopted (relational or contractual) drives suppliers' and buyers' collaboration in the same way; (2) to examine if both parties hold a similar view on the simultaneous use of both governance forms; and (3) to explore whether their perceptions on governance, collaboration and performance differ.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used data from a survey of 150 matched buyer–supplier dyads from South Korea, using structural equation modeling (SEM) for the analysis.

Findings

(1) While governance mechanisms assist collaboration and affect operational and innovation outcomes, the significance and relative strength of the proposed relationships are perceived differently by buyers and suppliers. (2) Contrasting results are found regarding the interaction effect of the governance mechanisms on collaboration: a complementary relationship for the buyer and a substitutive relationship for the supplier.

Originality/value

Studies on buyer–supplier relationships have yielded inconsistent results regarding whether the interactions of governance mechanisms function as substitutes or complements, because research has largely been conducted from the buyer's perspective, rather than the supplier's; this imbalanced view calls for integrated perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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