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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 1992

John D. Whitley

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Economic Modeling in the Nordic Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-859-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Rebecca Bradshaw

One of the projects being funded in the Access to Network Resources (ANR) category of the Electronic Libraries Programme in the UK is ADAM. ADAM aims to provide an…

Abstract

One of the projects being funded in the Access to Network Resources (ANR) category of the Electronic Libraries Programme in the UK is ADAM. ADAM aims to provide an information gateway to quality assured information on the Internet in Art, Design, Architecture and Media. This paper outlines the background to the project, ways in which resources are selected for the ADAM database, methods of searching ADAM and plans for the future.

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Program, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2010

Mats Forsgren and Mo Yamin

A close reading of Adam Smith’s works, “An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of Wealth of Nations” and “The Theory of Moral Sentiments,” indicates that he would not…

Abstract

A close reading of Adam Smith’s works, “An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of Wealth of Nations” and “The Theory of Moral Sentiments,” indicates that he would not support the advocacy of free markets wholeheartedly. His view on market systems, although “free,” implies strong institutions and regulations. Adam Smith would have been particularly concerned with the fact that the large multinationals are as much political actors as they are economic actors. He would have argued that there may be ‘moral‘ limits to globalization. In his view, the general rules of morality are (in modern parlance) ‘socially embedded.’ Thus, sympathy and fellow‐feeling mostly operate at ‘close quarters’ and, in particular, they may not be effective at a transnational level.

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Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

David John Farmer

This paper explores the relevance of Adam Smith’s invisible hand and the remainder of his legacy for public management. The paper’s central claim is that, by approaching…

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This paper explores the relevance of Adam Smith’s invisible hand and the remainder of his legacy for public management. The paper’s central claim is that, by approaching Adam Smith and his legacy, public managers can assist themselves to do what they should do - examine their latent assumptions. The first of three challenges in approaching Adam Smith’s ideas is to get Smith right, because he has been widely misunderstood. The second is to question Smith’s account of conceptual space; it is desirable to go beyond him. The third challenge is to explore in specific terms the potential for public management of an understanding of Smith and his legacy

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International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Stuart Rosenberg

Josh Brochhausen and Adam Podrat, as partners in The Resource, wrote commercial music for the ads of several companies. They were innovators in the recording studio, and…

Abstract

Josh Brochhausen and Adam Podrat, as partners in The Resource, wrote commercial music for the ads of several companies. They were innovators in the recording studio, and their music appealed to young consumers.

Josh and Adam also had become involved in producing records for hip hop artists. They undertook a project called Deaf in the Family, which was a full length album featuring artists from the hip hop underground. The record was well received among music critics from the underground press, but the project made no money because Josh and Adam did not have the financing to secure the appropriate clearances for the right to use samples from existing songs.

Their problem centered on the uncertainty of financial success in producing hip hop records, which was their passion, and deciding whether to devote energy and resources toward it, and away from making commercial music, which was their livelihood.

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The CASE Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Emir Ozeren, Omur Yasar Saatcioglu and Erhan Aydin

Social entrepreneurs innovatively exploit opportunities and create, in this way, social change and value by bringing together different resources to meet social needs and…

Abstract

Purpose

Social entrepreneurs innovatively exploit opportunities and create, in this way, social change and value by bringing together different resources to meet social needs and solve social problems. To achieve this, given their limited size and financial resources, the personal ties and social networks that social entrepreneurs build in this process play a crucial role in developing relationships and enabling their ventures to succeed. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of network processes in innovative activities carried out by social entrepreneurs and to stress the importance of network processes rather than network structure/design for social innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

“Çöp(m)adam” (Garbage Ladies), a social development project and business in Ayvalik, Turkey (which aims to provide opportunities for women who have never had the chance to work and earn regular salaries in the course of their lifetimes), was explored qualitatively as a case study within the framework of the network orchestration theory. In-depth, semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted. Relevant documents about Çöp(m)adam were also collected at the time of the interview to provide the triangulation of reference material for thematic analysis and post-research inquiry.

Findings

It has been found that Çöp(m)adam dynamically manages the network process in the course of realizing social innovation and builds a win-win environment that creates value both for the future of the social enterprise and for all the actors in the network by integrating the relationships among the actors it is in a relationship with.

Originality/value

In contrast to traditional studies dealing with the network theory, this research focuses on network processes rather than network structure. Also, since the literature provides evidence for profit-based organizations, the study differentiates into two main reasons. First, the authors adopt a case study approach in social entrepreneurship for social value creation, and second, based on the case study, the authors provide a conceptual enrichment through proposing the sub-categories of knowledge mobility, innovation appropriability and network stability in orchestration processes. This paper seeks to broaden the existing understanding of how social entrepreneurial processes and innovative outcomes are shaped by social networks and orchestration processes in a network-centric innovation from the viewpoint of a hub/focal firm by undertaking research on a less examined type of enterprise and context – namely, a social entrepreneurial venture in Turkey.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

John Conway O'Brien

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balanceeconomics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary toman′s finding the good life and society…

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A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balance economics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary to man′s finding the good life and society enduring as a civilized instrumentality. Looks for authority to great men of the past and to today′s moral philosopher: man is an ethical animal. The 13 essays are: 1. Evolutionary Economics: The End of It All? which challenges the view that Darwinism destroyed belief in a universe of purpose and design; 2. Schmoller′s Political Economy: Its Psychic, Moral and Legal Foundations, which centres on the belief that time‐honoured ethical values prevail in an economy formed by ties of common sentiment, ideas, customs and laws; 3. Adam Smith by Gustav von Schmoller – Schmoller rejects Smith′s natural law and sees him as simply spreading the message of Calvinism; 4. Pierre‐Joseph Proudhon, Socialist – Karl Marx, Communist: A Comparison; 5. Marxism and the Instauration of Man, which raises the question for Marx: is the flowering of the new man in Communist society the ultimate end to the dialectical movement of history?; 6. Ethical Progress and Economic Growth in Western Civilization; 7. Ethical Principles in American Society: An Appraisal; 8. The Ugent Need for a Consensus on Moral Values, which focuses on the real dangers inherent in there being no consensus on moral values; 9. Human Resources and the Good Society – man is not to be treated as an economic resource; man′s moral and material wellbeing is the goal; 10. The Social Economist on the Modern Dilemma: Ethical Dwarfs and Nuclear Giants, which argues that it is imperative to distinguish good from evil and to act accordingly: existentialism, situation ethics and evolutionary ethics savour of nihilism; 11. Ethical Principles: The Economist′s Quandary, which is the difficulty of balancing the claims of disinterested science and of the urge to better the human condition; 12. The Role of Government in the Advancement of Cultural Values, which discusses censorship and the funding of art against the background of the US Helms Amendment; 13. Man at the Crossroads draws earlier themes together; the author makes the case for rejecting determinism and the “operant conditioning” of the Skinner school in favour of the moral progress of autonomous man through adherence to traditional ethical values.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Erik S. Reinert

This paper attempts to trace and describe the role played by the government sector – the state – in promoting economic growth in Western societies since the Renaissance…

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This paper attempts to trace and describe the role played by the government sector – the state – in promoting economic growth in Western societies since the Renaissance. One important conclusion is that the antagonism between state and market, which has characterised the twentieth century, is a relatively new phenomenon. Since the Renaissance one very important task of the state has been to create well‐functioning markets by providing a legal framework, standards, credit, physical infrastructure and – if necessary – to function temporarily as an entrepreneur of last resort. Early economists were acutely aware that national markets did not occur spontaneously, and they used “modern” ideas like synergies, increasing returns, and innovation theory when arguing for the right kind of government policy. In fact, mercantilist economics saw it as a main task to extend the synergetic economic effects observed within cities to the territory of a nation‐state. The paper argues that the classical Anglo‐Saxon tradition in economics – fundamentally focused on barter and distribution, rather than on production and knowledge – systematically fails to grasp these wider issues in economic development, and it brings in and discusses the role played by the state in alternative traditions of non‐equilibrium economics.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2008

Willie Henderson

This is an interesting collection by scholars who defended their theses between 2002 and 2004. It is focused on Adam Smith and treats Smith in a number of interesting…

Abstract

This is an interesting collection by scholars who defended their theses between 2002 and 2004. It is focused on Adam Smith and treats Smith in a number of interesting though, perforce, loosely organized contexts. Part one gathers together three essays, by Hanley, on “Smith and Aristotle,” Kuiper, on Smith's “feminist contemporaries,” and Mitchell, on eighteenth century notions of “systems,” under the heading “Adam Smith, his sources and influence.” Part two contains five essays: Forman-Barzilai, on “connexion”; Von Villiez on a comparison of Smith and Rawls; Frierson on “Smithian environmental virtue ethics”; Brubaker on the “wisdom of nature”; and, lastly, Flanders, on “moral luck,” all under the heading “Adam Smith and Moral Theory.” Part three organized under “Adam Smith and economics” contains three essays, one each by Hurtado-Prieto, on Smith and Mandeville, Montes (one of the joint editors) on “Smith and Newtonianism,” and Paganelli, on “vanity” and “paper money.” The last section, part four, contains three essays one each by Smith, on “progress,” Trincado, on “Smith's criticism of the doctrine of utility,” and Schliesser (the other joint editor), on Smith's “conception of philosophy.” The range of the contributions illustrates both the revival of serious intellectual interest in Smith as a philosophe and in the context of eighteenth century studies or of the enlightenment more generally. The Routledge series “Studies in the History of Economics” has always been prepared to be innovative and the re-contextualization of Smith's work in the variety of contexts presented here maintains the series’ reputation for changing frameworks within which to view the intellectual history of economics.

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A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-904-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

John M.T. Balmer and Snorre Stotvig

Provides an introduction to corporate identity management; gives an overview of the private banking sector both in the UK and overseas and, using a case study focusing on…

Abstract

Provides an introduction to corporate identity management; gives an overview of the private banking sector both in the UK and overseas and, using a case study focusing on the private bankers Adam and Co., describes the elements forming that bank’s corporate identity. These elements were history; key incidents; and service quality. The latter was found to be the most likely contributor to that bank’s identity. Argues that bank managers, in addition to asking the questions What is our business?, and what is our image? , should ask, What is our identity?

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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