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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Adam Gordon

There has been no shortage of rosy visions for the future of Africa or its regions. Almost without exception, these visions have been dashed by reality. The question

Abstract

Purpose

There has been no shortage of rosy visions for the future of Africa or its regions. Almost without exception, these visions have been dashed by reality. The question therefore arises: “To what extent or under what conditions is visioning an ideal future a worthy exercise?” or “Under what conditions is it useful and when is it limiting?” In anticipating the future in general, and seeking a better future for Africa in particular, might foresight tools built on another (non‐visionary) basis provide better fruit? This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers this question as it applies to scenario planning in particular, by investigating recent, contrasting case studies of scenario‐building activities in Africa (Tanzania and South Africa).

Findings

The paper determines the appropriate uses and limits of “visionary” scenario planning, and suggests a contrasting “adaptive” basis for scenario work.

Originality/value

It is argued that maintaining the purpose‐platform distinction between these two modes is fundamental to getting full value out of scenario work in general, and in the African context in particular. The contrasting case studies explain how and why the adaptive‐normative distinction is important; how different purposes each demand different use of the scenario process tools that currently exist, and show why failure to fit scenario approaches to purpose greatly diminishes the efficacy of the method for either purpose.

Details

Foresight, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Jan Keane

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National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1951

HORACE THOROGOOD

Each of these London West End clubs whose libraries I have been visiting is an association of men with interests of a special kind, mainly political, professional or…

Abstract

Each of these London West End clubs whose libraries I have been visiting is an association of men with interests of a special kind, mainly political, professional or artistic. The libraries, therefore, have this peculiar interest: they reflect the more serious tastes and avocations of the upper crust of London society. Most possess literary treasures or curiosities not, or rarely, to be found elsewhere. The difference between them and other libraries might be likened to the difference between a public park and a private garden. They are very personal.

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Library Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Jan Keane

Abstract

Details

National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk…

Abstract

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk distributor because he failed to comply with a requirement that he should provide protective curtains to his milk floats, was a rare and in many ways, an interesting event. The Tribunal in this case was set up under reg. 16(2) (f), Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963, constituted in accordance with Part I, clause 2 (2), Schedule 4 of the Regulations. Part II outlines procedure for such tribunals. The Tribunal is similar to that authorized by S.30, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, which deals with the registration of dairymen, dairy farms and farmers, and the Milk and Dairies (General) Regulations, 1959. Part II, Schedule 2 of the Act provided for reference to a tribunal of appeals against refusal or cancellation of registration by the Ministry, but of producers only. A local authority's power to refuse to register or cancellation contained in Part I, Schedule 2 provided for no such reference and related to instances where “public health is or is likely to be endangered by any act or default” of such a person, who was given the right of appeal against refusal to register, etc., to a magistrates' court. No such limitation exists in respect of the revoking, suspending, refusal to renew a licence under the Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963; an appeal against same lies to the Minister, who must refer the matter to a tribunal, if the person so requests. This occurred in the case under discussion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1928

WE hope that all London librarians will give full consideration to the project of the London Branch of the Library Association to provide a union catalogue of the…

Abstract

WE hope that all London librarians will give full consideration to the project of the London Branch of the Library Association to provide a union catalogue of the non‐fiction Stocks of Metropolitan libraries. They are to be asked if they will co‐operate in the scheme by providing cards of their Stock of uniform size, or by making some contribution (a more difficult matter this) to the cost of the catlogue. Such a catalogue kept at the Central Library for Students, combined with the telephone and general goodwill, would bring about a co‐ordination of libraties on a voluntary basis with results in good as yet scarcely realized. The idea is not novel; it was rejected a score of years ago as visionary or impractable. It may have been visionary then; it is not so now. Modern librarians simply must get together if they wish to avoid being made to do so.

Details

New Library World, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Kate-Riin Kont and Signe Jantson

The aim of the current article is to investigate satisfaction of the staff of Estonian university libraries with the organization of work by analyzing characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the current article is to investigate satisfaction of the staff of Estonian university libraries with the organization of work by analyzing characteristics, aspects and dimensions of the work, such as self-realization and skills realization opportunities, task complexity, task interdependence and fair division of tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this paper is based on a review of relevant literature to provide an overview of the concept of work organization, and the results of the original online survey created by the paper’s authors, conducted among Estonian university libraries. The results are interpreted on the basis of direction in the literature, and the authors’ opinions, based on our long-term working experience in Estonian academic libraries.

Findings

Although a number of Estonian university librarians were mostly satisfied with the division of labor within their departments, the respondents feel that duties in the library as a whole should be reorganized and workloads should be divided more equally. Almost half of the respondents have performed (in addition to their main job) duties that are not included in their job descriptions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no research has been previously carried out in the Estonian library context into work organization and coordination. Based on the current study, it can be concluded that the biggest challenge for university libraries in Estonia is to fixate clearly job descriptions and work procedures, divide job duties fairly and guarantee balanced work load. Additional duties should be accompanied with additional remuneration.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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