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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Adam Clifford and Francesca Georgina Kemp

“Case-complexity” is a widely used but under-explored concept across health and social care. A region’s Intensive Support Teams (ISTs) had been reporting an increase in…

Abstract

Purpose

“Case-complexity” is a widely used but under-explored concept across health and social care. A region’s Intensive Support Teams (ISTs) had been reporting an increase in “case-complexity”, but had not tested this hypothesis against data. This study aims to investigate this question through a pragmatic mixed-methods approach as part of a wider service evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for People with Learning Disabilities (HoNOS-LD) scores were used (n = 1,766) to estimate average “case-complexity” of referrals over an eight-year sample period. Two focus groups for IST staff (n = 18) explored why “case-complexity” appears to be increasing. Participant perspectives were subjected to thematic analysis.

Findings

Average HoNOS-LD scores have steadily increased over the sample period, suggestive of increasing “case-complexity”. Focus groups identified three broad themes to potentially explain the increased complexity: effects of Transforming Care; people’s changing and unchanging support systems; and issues related to mild and borderline intellectual disability. Many perspectives are grounded in or supported by evidence.

Research limitations/implications

Implications and limitations of findings are discussed, including areas for further consideration and research. The well-designed “short-cut” is promoted as a strategy for busy professionals in need of practice-based evidence but with limited research time and resources.

Originality/value

The findings and discussion will be of value to anyone involved in the design, commissioning and delivery of mental health and challenging behaviour services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) under Transforming Care. Study methodology is easily replicable to build broader picture about “case-complexity” among UK’s IDD population.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Penelope Jane Standen, Adam Clifford and Kiran Jeenkeri

The purpose of this paper is to provide information for non-specialists on identifying the characteristics, assessment and support needs of people with intellectual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide information for non-specialists on identifying the characteristics, assessment and support needs of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) accessing mainstream services.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of relevant policy and research literature is supplemented with observations from the authors’ own experience of working in mental health services for people with ID.

Findings

With change in provision of services the likelihood of mainstream staff encountering someone with ID will increase. However, information on whether a person has ID or their level of ID is not always available to professionals in acute mental health services meeting an individual for the first time. Reliance on observational and interview-based assessments can leave people with ID vulnerable to a range of over- and under-diagnosis issues. This is as a result of difficulties with communication and emotional introspection, psychosocial masking, suggestibility, confabulation and acquiescence. For people with poor communication, carers will be the primary source of information and their contribution has to be taken into account.

Practical implications

Knowing or suspecting an individual has ID allows staff to take into account the various assessment, diagnosis and formulation issues that complicate a valid and reliable understanding of their mental health needs. Awareness about an individual’s ID also allows professionals to be vigilant to their own biases, where issues of diagnostic overshadowing or cognitive disintegration may be important considerations. However, understanding some of the practical and conceptual issues should ensure a cautious and critical approach to diagnosing, formulating and addressing this population’s mental health needs.

Originality/value

This synthesis of a review of the literature and observations from the authors’ experience of working in mental health services for people with ID provides an informed and practical briefing for those encountering people with ID accessing mainstream services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1966

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a…

Abstract

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a university—then four “new” schools were established between 1963 and 1964, three of the four in universities and the other closely linked with a university, though remaining independent. All four schools have their special features but I consider the more significant of Belfast's features to be its right, from the outset, to conduct all its own examinations for graduates and non‐graduates. Queen's was also the first British university to provide non‐graduates with courses in librarianship. (Strathclyde is the second.) All successful students are eligible for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (ALA) after they have completed the prescribed period of practical experience.

Details

New Library World, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Adam M. Williams, Fion Lau and Clifford P. McCue

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge public procurement professionals perceive as important for performing their duties.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge public procurement professionals perceive as important for performing their duties.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data generated from a job analysis study commissioned by the Universal Public Procurement Certification Council [UPPCC], this paper examined the knowledge sets that procurement officials recognize as necessary and sufficient for daily operations and professional development.

Findings

Principal Component Analysis is used to validate the six domains of knowledge covered on the survey. This paper identifies sets of core knowledge domains that are essential for procurement administration, including sourcing, negotiation process, contract administration, supply management and strategic procurement planning.

Originality/value

Furthermore, the authors incorporated anecdotal commentary information from the same survey to determine what additional professional development and continuing education opportunities procurement officials are seeking to improve performance in their current and future work roles.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Duane Windsor

A proposed typology of moral exemplars in business highlights instances selected to illustrate standards for inclusion. The typology distinguishes among champions, heroes…

Abstract

Purpose

A proposed typology of moral exemplars in business highlights instances selected to illustrate standards for inclusion. The typology distinguishes among champions, heroes, and saints as different kinds of business exemplars. The typology reflects variations in both specific decision conditions and moral value emphases of business actors. The typology also differentiates moral exemplars from moral neutrals (i.e., amoral actors) and moral sinners (i.e., moral value scofflaws). The objective is to advance understanding of moral character and moral courage in business settings.

Methodology/approach

The methodology combines original conceptual argument and brief case summaries taken from available literature. The chapter is not a systematic survey of literature but cites key works. Construction of the typology involved iteration between conceptual development and case interpretation.

Findings

The chapter separates business cases into private business and public business, and applies Adam Smith’s distinction between citizenship and good citizenship. An additional distinction is made between extreme conditions and normal conditions. Moral heroism in business is restricted to life-and-death or strongly analogous situations in extreme conditions such as hazardous whistleblowing. Moral sainthood in business involves extreme maximization of a single value going far beyond simple compliance with legal requirements and typical ethical norms – Smith’s definition of citizenship. Moral championing in business concerns some degree of lesser self-sacrifice in defense of important values reflecting Smith’s definition of good citizenship.

Research Limitations and Implications

The chapter is a selection of literature undertaken in iteration with the conceptual development effort. The original research aspect of the chapter is thus quite limited. The author is not positioned to judge the accuracy of published information, for or against a particular instance. The classifications thus depend on whether the instance would, if the generally reported facts are basically accurate, serve as a reasonable illustration of standards for inclusion. Criticisms have been made concerning some of the instances discussed here.

Practical Implications

The emphasis is on providing standards for defining moral exemplars for business to suggest how much can be accomplished in business through moral influence.

Originality

The conceptual contribution is original, although drawing on the philosophical literature debate about saints and heroes. The chapter treats exemplar as the overarching construct, separated into three kinds: heroes, saints, and champions. Sinner is implicit in the notion of saint. The chapter adds moral champions and moral neutrals to isolate moral heroism. The cases exist in the literature, but have been combined together here for the first time.

Details

Moral Saints and Moral Exemplars
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-075-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

David J. Collison

This paper examines the nature of propaganda and its use by corporations, particularly in the USA, over a period of nearly 100 years. It emphasises the invisibility of…

Abstract

This paper examines the nature of propaganda and its use by corporations, particularly in the USA, over a period of nearly 100 years. It emphasises the invisibility of much of this activity and propaganda’s importance for shaping acquiescence in corporate hegemony. The role played by corporate propaganda in the development of different forms of capitalism is addressed. The inculcation of accounting and finance students with values that serve corporate interests is considered: in this context propaganda is inferred in both the longstanding misrepresentation of Adam Smith, and the sustained illusion of competitive “free markets”. The role and language of the business media as a form of propaganda is considered, particularly regarding colonisation of social market economies by Anglo‐Saxon capitalism, which takes as incontestable the maximisation of shareholder value as the proper and necessary aim of corporate activity. It is argued that corporate propaganda has contributed to the accounting measure of business success being justified as an end in itself at the explicit expense of wider societal considerations.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

C. Clifford Defee, Terry Esper and Diane Mollenkopf

The paper's aim is to develop a closed‐loop supply chain orientation as a strategic alternative available to supply chain organizations seeking competitive advantage in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to develop a closed‐loop supply chain orientation as a strategic alternative available to supply chain organizations seeking competitive advantage in a setting that puts a premium on socially responsible decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature describing the concepts of supply chain orientation and supply chain leadership is used to develop a framework for achieving a competitive advantage.

Findings

Creating a closed‐loop supply chain orientation may be facilitated when the supply chain leader demonstrates a transformational leadership style, and when socially important environmental issues are present.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a synthesis of previously unconnected concepts in a conceptual framework that sets a stage for future research in this area.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the strategic importance of developing a closed‐loop supply chain orientation in the presence of environmental factors, and a supply chain leadership style that may enhance the transformation to such an orientation.

Originality/value

The paper extends the strategic concept of supply chain orientation to include forward and reverse flows in a holistic, closed‐loop view of the supply chain.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Abstract

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Katherine Adam, Colette Henry, Sarah Baillie and Jonathan Rushton

Agriculture and associated services are central to the rural economy of the United Kingdom. Rural veterinary enterprises are important providers of services to livestock…

Abstract

Purpose

Agriculture and associated services are central to the rural economy of the United Kingdom. Rural veterinary enterprises are important providers of services to livestock producers, but are now facing concerns over their future economic viability. The objectives of this chapter are to outline the changes occurring in the veterinary and agricultural sectors, and to explore the main issues affecting veterinary enterprises in a changing business environment.

Methodology

This is a conceptual chapter contextualised mainly within the United Kingdom. As such, the methodological approach comprises a critical review of current academic literatures, as well as government reports and relevant media articles.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that the commercial success of rural veterinary enterprises is critical to ensuring the future provision of high-quality animal health services to both farmers and government. The current issues facing farmers are likely to affect their willingness and resources to invest in veterinary services. Furthermore, farmers may have doubts as to vets’ ability to provide business-focussed services that add value. In addition, many public services are outsourced to private veterinary enterprises, and forthcoming policy changes are expected to lead to reduced income from public sources for both vets and their livestock farming clients. While wider issues affecting agriculture are beyond the control of private veterinary practitioners, veterinary enterprises will need to ensure that they can deal with such challenges and, where required, adapt their services accordingly.

Research limitations

The chapter is based on a review of extant literatures, and the scope of the research is therefore limited to existing knowledge about the farm animal veterinary business landscape.

Originality/value

The chapter summarises current knowledge of the challenges facing rural veterinary enterprises. While some of the issues described are specific to the veterinary sector, many are also relevant to other rural SMEs providing knowledge-intensive services to farmers. The chapter also describes areas requiring further empirical research.

Details

Exploring Rural Enterprise: New Perspectives On Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-109-1

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