Search results

1 – 10 of 12
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

René Olie and Ad van Iterson

Since the mid-1980s, much research attention has been devoted to top management teams and their impact on the strategic behavior and performance of firms. In particular…

Abstract

Since the mid-1980s, much research attention has been devoted to top management teams and their impact on the strategic behavior and performance of firms. In particular, this research has focused on the role of top managers’ background, values, and experiences in explaining the choices they make. So far, this research has largely failed to address the national context in which top management teams are formed and operate. Empirical studies have typically involved top management teams of U.S. firms. Other studies are rare, and when they exist, they usually do not take the national context into account. This paper explores the impact of national context characterized by society-specific value systems and institutions, on the composition, organization, and functioning of top management. We address three topics in particular: (1) national variations in the structure and practices of top management and their implications for managerial choices; (2) national governance systems that define and constrain the tasks and functioning of top management teams; and (3) national institutions that help to define managerial selection, promotion, and career patterns.

Details

Managing Multinationals in a Knowledge Economy: Economics, Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-050-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Managing Multinationals in a Knowledge Economy: Economics, Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-050-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Managing Multinationals in a Knowledge Economy: Economics, Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-050-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Grant Michelson and Rohan Miller

Drawing on the anthropological literature, this paper aims to develop a model of taboos (morality) that applies to the marketing, consumer behaviour and consumption contexts.

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the anthropological literature, this paper aims to develop a model of taboos (morality) that applies to the marketing, consumer behaviour and consumption contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is mainly conceptual but illustrates the general premises of the model with a case study of “dark” tourism and the contemporary marketing of the Auschwitz concentration camp.

Findings

The paper shows that even extreme taboos can be commodified and traded-off, and that not even the horrific deaths and large-scale suffering that occurred at Auschwitz are “sacred”. This can occur through reframing and seeing the same taboo through different national lens.

Research limitations/implications

Questions pertaining to consumer morality are relative rather than universalistic, and even the most extreme cases of taboo can still be successfully marketed.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to attempt to conceptually design a model and then explain the taboo process as it applies to a marketing and consumption context.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Arndt Sorge

Outlines briefly the history and progression of business systems inThe Netherlands. Describes how human resources are produced andcultivated, in particular through the…

Abstract

Outlines briefly the history and progression of business systems in The Netherlands. Describes how human resources are produced and cultivated, in particular through the Dutch education system, and assesses its effectiveness. Looks at the integration of human resources in the work organization, pinpointing particular experiments which have been carried out. Outlines various shifts in emphasis from the post Second World War period in Dutch industry and human resource concepts. Concludes that the changes in industrial work organization and human resource management are in line with traditional Dutch ideals and are becoming increasingly effective.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Bashir Ahmad, Hussain Tariq, Qingxiong (Derek) Weng, Samson Samwel Shillamkwese and Nadeem Sohail

Based on revenge theory and the three objectives of social interaction theory of aggression, the purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to answer why and when a…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on revenge theory and the three objectives of social interaction theory of aggression, the purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to answer why and when a subordinate’s own behaviour instigates abuse at the workplace. In particular, the authors argue that subordinate gossip behaviour instils in supervisors a thought of revenge towards that subordinate, which, in turn, leads to abusive supervision. Specifically, this hypothesised relationship is augmented when the supervisor feels close to the gossiper (i.e. psychological proximity).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two independent studies to test the moderated mediation model, which collectively investigate why and when subordinate gossip behaviour provokes abusive supervision in the workplace. A lagged study (i.e. Study 1: 422 supervisors and subordinates) in a large retail company and an experience sampling study (i.e. Study 2: 96 supervisors and subordinates with 480 daily surveys) in multiple organisations provide support for the moderated mediation model.

Findings

The two-study (i.e. a lagged study and an experience sampling study) findings support the integrated model, which has mainly focussed on instrumental consideration of abusive supervision that influences the supervisor–subordinate relationship.

Originality/value

The two-study investigation has important and meaningful implications for abusive supervision research because it determines that subordinate gossip behaviour is more threating to a supervisor when the subordinate and the supervisor are psychological close to each other than when they are not. That is because when they are close, the supervisor is not expecting gossip behaviour from the subordinate, thus giving rise to an abusive workplace.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Ming-Huei Chen and Somya Agrawal

Based on group development theories, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate student’s team behavior during different stages of team development.

Abstract

Purpose

Based on group development theories, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate student’s team behavior during different stages of team development.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey method was used to collect data over a period of 18 weeks from 40 undergraduate students enrolled in an entrepreneurship course. Hierarchical linear regression and structural equation modeling were used for analysis.

Findings

Findings reveal that during the early stages of team development, a leader with an entrepreneurial approach directed student’s team behavior proactively. Analysis showed that lower level of task conflict strengthened the impact of leadership on team cohesion. It was also found that during the pre-final stages, students demonstrated knowledge-sharing behavior once they were characterized by team cohesion.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from student teams, which may not generalize to organizational teams.

Social implications

This research presents first of the few empirical studies investigating the above-mentioned interrelationships and provides insights on the order of events that contribute to perceived team performance. An attempt was also made to extend the group theories by exploring the effects of leadership on task conflict.

Originality/value

Showcasing the dynamics of student’s team behavior during the different stages of team development, this study highlights the importance of teamwork to students and provides useful insights to course facilitators and teachers. In light of the results, educators should take account of team dynamics when designing effective teaching methods and incentives.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Christopher E. Whelpley and Michael A. McDaniel

Consistency theory and ego-defense theory have been used to examine the relationship between counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and self-esteem; however, these two…

Abstract

Purpose

Consistency theory and ego-defense theory have been used to examine the relationship between counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and self-esteem; however, these two theoretical approaches pose different directions for the expected relation. In line with this, previous research concerning the relationship between self-esteem and CWB has found inconsistent empirical results. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the relation between self-esteem and counterproductive behavior at work and draw conclusions about the merit of the competing theories. This study also examines the type of self-esteem as a potential moderator to this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a psychometric meta-analysis of the relation between self-esteem and CWB using 21 correlations with a total n of 5,135.

Findings

The estimated population correlation was −0.26. The moderator analyses showed that global self-esteem had a stronger relation with CWB than organization-based self-esteem.

Practical implications

The relation between self-esteem and counterproductive behavior at work is important to organizations for two reasons. First, CWBs are very costly at all levels of the organization. Second, organizations and managers have some control over the level of their employee’s self-esteem.

Originality/value

Previous research has used both consistency theory and ego-defense theory to make predictions concerning the self-esteem and CWB relationship. This paper provides support for examining this relation using consistency theory due to the negative correlation the authors found between CWB and self-esteem.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12