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1 – 10 of over 2000

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Phil Minshull

Can models be set in place to prevent neglect and abuse in inpatient settings from becoming systemic? This article suggests that they can, and describes how the…

Abstract

Can models be set in place to prevent neglect and abuse in inpatient settings from becoming systemic? This article suggests that they can, and describes how the establishment of multi‐agency forums within care teams can help foster working practices that are open, accountable and respectful.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Penny West

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Deborah Wildgoose, Peter Flanagan and Melanie Crewe

Lack of therapeutic activities, or simply ‘something to do’ has been widely criticised as a major shortcoming of acute inpatient psychiatric units. Deborah Wildgoose and…

Abstract

Lack of therapeutic activities, or simply ‘something to do’ has been widely criticised as a major shortcoming of acute inpatient psychiatric units. Deborah Wildgoose and colleagues describe how one trust introduced a flexible, innovative programme of evening and weekend activities run by sessional workers from outside the mental health services. The programme was devised in consultation with service users and was reported by patients and staff to have reduced the stress of hospital admission and improved the whole ward atmosphere.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Elizabeth Hughes, Neil Robertson, Cheryl Kipping and Claire Lynch

Dual diagnosis poses particular challenges for inpatient mental health services. Workers have low levels of training, clinical experience and support to deliver integrated…

Abstract

Dual diagnosis poses particular challenges for inpatient mental health services. Workers have low levels of training, clinical experience and support to deliver integrated care that combines mental health and substance use interventions. In addition, inpatient workers have to balance being therapeutic with ensuring that illicit substance use does not occur on the wards. This often leads to confrontation and poor engagement.In order to improve the capabilities of the workers to deliver more effective interventions for this group of service users, dual diagnosis training should be a high priority for acute inpatient services. However, there are a number of challenges in the implementation of this including lack of resources to fund training and specialist roles, lack of time to attend training (and supervision), and lack of time to implement learning in routine care.This paper will describe the policy drivers for the improvement of dual diagnosis care in acute psychiatric inpatient services, and how two initiatives in London are overcoming some of the obstacles and showing some promising initial outcomes. This paper will make recommendations for future research and developments.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Nicola Vick and Cheryl Kipping

Addressing the needs of people with a dual diagnosis is a core component of acute inpatient mental healthcare. In 2006/2007, the Healthcare Commission conducted a national…

Abstract

Addressing the needs of people with a dual diagnosis is a core component of acute inpatient mental healthcare. In 2006/2007, the Healthcare Commission conducted a national review of NHS acute inpatient wards in England. The review included five indicators of particular relevance to working with people with a dual diagnosis. This paper provides an overview of the review process, reports the dual diagnosis findings and considers their implications for improving the care and treatment of people with a dual diagnosis in the inpatient setting.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Paul Greenwood, Tony Ryan, John Keaveny and Ripu Deo

This article describes the processes undertaken to implement change in East Lancashire adult mental health services through New Ways of Working. The views of users, carers…

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Abstract

This article describes the processes undertaken to implement change in East Lancashire adult mental health services through New Ways of Working. The views of users, carers and staff of the services at the start of the project are described, and an overview offered of the development work that took place to support the change. Barriers to change are also described.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Suzanne Heffernan, Sandra Neil and Stephen Weatherhead

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which inpatient mental health services attend to the religious needs of service-users. Literature is presented to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which inpatient mental health services attend to the religious needs of service-users. Literature is presented to argue that whilst the importance of religion is highlighted in consumer accounts, research and policy; inpatient services continue to neglect religion and service-users consistently report insufficient attention to religious needs during hospitalisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This review adopts a narrative approach to the literature, drawing upon published journal articles, book chapters and policy documentation.

Findings

Literature into the topic area is reviewed and discussed within three themes. First, the extent to which religious needs are currently met is explored. Second, potential reasons for neglect of religion are considered. Finally, examples of religiously informed group programmes, individual psychotherapy and the use of traditional healers are detailed.

Practical implications

Findings of the review point towards the requirement for inpatient services to more adequately meet religious needs in terms of available facilities. The need for spiritual assessment and collaboration with hospital chaplains is also highlighted, along with the call for increased staff training.

Originality/value

It is expected that this review will be of interest to a range of stakeholders including professionals, policy makers and service users. It highlights the void in clinical attention to religious needs and offers practical suggestions for meeting this need.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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