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Article

Marc Solga, Jaqueline Betz, Moritz Düsenberg and Helen Ostermann

This paper aims to investigate the effects of political skill in a specific workplace setting – the job negotiation. The authors expected negotiator political skill to be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of political skill in a specific workplace setting – the job negotiation. The authors expected negotiator political skill to be positively related to distributive negotiation outcome, problem-solving as a negotiation strategy to mediate this relationship and political skill to also moderate – that is amplify – the link between problem-solving and negotiation outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, a laboratory-based negotiation simulation was conducted with 88 participants; the authors obtained self-reports of political skill prior to the negotiation and – to account for non-independence of negotiating partners’ outcome – used the ActorPartner Interdependence Model for data analysis. Study 2 was carried out as a real-life negotiation study with 100 managers of a multinational corporation who were given the opportunity to re-negotiate their salary package prior to a longer-term foreign assignment. Here, the authors drew on two objective measures of negotiation success, increase of annual gross salary and additional annual net benefits.

Findings

In Study 1, the initial hypothesis – political skill will be positively related to negotiator success – was fully supported. In Study 2, all three hypotheses (see above) were fully supported for additional annual net benefits and partly supported for increase of annual gross salary.

Originality/value

To the authors' best knowledge, this paper presents the first study to examine political skill as a focal predictor variable in the negotiation context. Furthermore, the studies also broaden the emotion-centered approach to social effectiveness that is prevalent in current negotiation research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Edward W. Miles and Margaret M. LaSalle

The purpose of this paper is to present how previous research has shown that, in negotiations that have integrative potential, men negotiate greater outcomes than do…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present how previous research has shown that, in negotiations that have integrative potential, men negotiate greater outcomes than do women. The primary purpose of this set of studies was to determine whether gender difference could be attributed to more effective performance in dividing value, more effective performance in creating value, or both.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, participants negotiated a case situation that had integrative potential. Participants were randomly assigned to a side of the case and to a negotiation counterpart. This provided a comparison of all possible dyad gender combinations – female‐female, female‐male, and male‐male. Statistical tests included actorpartner interdependence model (APIM) analysis, ANOVA, χ2, and t‐tests. Study 2 replicated a sub‐set of the study 1 tests using a different sample and a different negotiation case situation.

Findings

Male‐male dyads created more value than female‐female dyads in both study 1 and study 2. No differences were found in the proportion of the negotiation “pie” claimed by men versus women. These combined results indicate that, in mixed‐motive negotiations, gender differences in individual‐level outcomes are a function of the amount of value created by the dyad, not in differences in the division of value.

Originality/value

The paper extends research regarding gender and negotiation performance by pinpointing that, while men obtain greater outcomes than women in negotiations that have integrative potential, the difference in outcomes emanates from differences in creating value, not from differences in dividing value.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Content available
Article

Anushree Tandon, Amandeep Dhir and Matti Mäntymäki

The association between social media and jealousy is an aspect of the dark side of social media that has garnered significant attention in the past decade. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The association between social media and jealousy is an aspect of the dark side of social media that has garnered significant attention in the past decade. However, the understanding of this association is fragmented and needs to be assimilated to provide scholars with an overview of the current boundaries of knowledge in this area. This systematic literature review (SLR) aims to fulfill this need.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertake an SLR to assimilate the current knowledge regarding the association between social media and jealousy, and they examine the phenomenon of social media-induced jealousy (SoMJ). Forty-five empirical studies are curated and analyzed using stringent protocols to elucidate the existing research profile and thematic research areas.

Findings

The research themes emerging from the SLR are (1) the need for a theoretical and methodological grounding of the concept, (2) the sociodemographic differences in SoMJ experiences, (3) the antecedents of SoMJ (individual, partner, rival and platform affordances) and (4) the positive and negative consequences of SoMJ. Conceptual and methodological improvements are needed to undertake a temporal and cross-cultural investigation of factors that may affect SoMJ and acceptable thresholds for social media behavior across different user cohorts. This study also identifies the need to expand current research boundaries by developing new methodologies and focusing on under-investigated variables.

Originality/value

The study may assist in the development of practical measures to raise awareness about the adverse consequences of SoMJ, such as intimate partner violence and cyberstalking.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Edward Kass

This paper aims to explore the relationship between procedural, interpersonal, informational, and distributive justice and negotiator outcome satisfaction and desire for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between procedural, interpersonal, informational, and distributive justice and negotiator outcome satisfaction and desire for future negotiations (DFNs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research invokes and builds theories suggesting a link between perceptions of fair treatment and counterfactual generation. Data come from freely interacting negotiating dyads comprised of undergraduate students.

Findings

One's own outcomes obtained, procedural, informational, and distributive justice perceptions each uniquely predicted negotiator outcome satisfaction. Procedural and informational justice perceptions also indirectly affected outcome satisfaction through their effect on distributive justice perceptions. In turn, outcome satisfaction, and informational and interpersonal justice perceptions each uniquely predicted DFNs.

Research limitations/implications

While this study reveals an important set of effects for study, it is correlational in nature. Future research should experimentally manipulate fair treatment to provide a true experiment and should also test the proposed mediators.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that listening to the other party, treating him or her with respect and dignity, and explaining oneself can have powerful consequences for the other party's outcome satisfaction and DFNs. Each of these, in turn, can affect one's own long run well‐being.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study linking procedural and informational justice perceptions and negotiator outcome satisfaction. It is one of the few studies exploring a unique relationship between outcome satisfaction and procedural justice and may be the only one doing so with interactional justice in any setting. It investigates the effects of perceived fair treatment among relative equals rather than in the context of superiors and subordinates.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article

Colette Hoption

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential consequences of helping behaviors on leader and follower relationship satisfaction and transformational leadership (TFL…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential consequences of helping behaviors on leader and follower relationship satisfaction and transformational leadership (TFL) ratings. It is argued that follower helping behaviors can violate leaders’ and followers’ expectations of each other, and especially disadvantage male leaders because of gender-role stereotypes.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, data were collected from 61 dyads (25 male and 34 female supervisors, 23 male and 38 female subordinates, two participants did not disclose their gender; M age=35.56 years, SD=10.41). In Study 2, data were collected from 125 participants (66 female and 58 male subordinates, 22 female and 25 male supervisors; 79 respondents did not disclose their gender; M age=39.21 years, SD=11.25).

Findings

Helping behaviors were positively associated with relationship satisfaction suggesting that leaders were amenable to receiving help from followers (Study 1). However, follower helping behaviors were negatively related to TFL ratings for male but not female leaders (Study 2).

Research limitations/implications

While leaders may be amenable to increased follower involvement in leadership, future research is needed to investigate followers’ openness to, and intentions behind increasing their involvement in leadership, as well as strategies for leaders to mitigate unintended consequences.

Practical implications

For the sake of their TFL ratings, leaders should minimize any direct benefit from follower helping behaviors, and emphasize how follower helping behaviors aid follower development and/or benefit the organization.

Originality/value

The findings illustrate the dual-nature of follower helping behaviors: they have the potential to enhance leader relationship satisfaction, and also compromise perceptions of TFL.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Rotem Shacham, Noa Nelson and Rachel Ben-Ari

This study aims to test the contributions of a new type of resilience, Trait Negotiation Resilience (TNR; Nelson et al., 2016), to negotiators’ effective behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the contributions of a new type of resilience, Trait Negotiation Resilience (TNR; Nelson et al., 2016), to negotiators’ effective behavior, perception of opponent and negotiation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory study (N = 98; 49 dyads) featuring a mixed-motive negotiation task. Participants self-reported TNR (emotional skills, social sensitivity, intrinsic motivation for self-improvement and a sense of purpose to life events) up to a week before negotiating. After the negotiations, they rated their opponents on resilient, effective personal attributes and reported their own subjective value (SV). Trained judges watched the negotiations, coded objective outcomes and rated negotiators on dimensions of effective negotiation behavior. Statistical analyses accounted for dyadic interdependence.

Findings

TNR predicted higher levels of effective negotiation behavior, which, in turn, fully mediated TNR’s favorable contribution to negotiated value. TNR also predicted higher levels of SV, and this contribution was partially mediated by perceiving effective personal attributes in the opponent.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was moderate and it consisted of undergraduate students, most of them female.

Originality/value

Evidence on the contribution of a personality construct to both outcome and process negotiator variables; contribution to the research of specific types of resilience.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Junjun Cheng, Yimin Huang and Yong Su

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the role of relationality in buyer–supplier negotiations and how it varies across cultural settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the role of relationality in buyer–supplier negotiations and how it varies across cultural settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multisession simulation design, this study recruited research participants (n = 82) from diverse cultural backgrounds to play the role of either buyer or supplier for two negotiation tasks. Regression analyses were used to test the relationships among relational constructs as well as the moderating role of relational culture.

Findings

Results show that negotiators’ relational self-construal enhances their relational commitment to the ongoing negotiations, which leads to a higher level of relational capital accumulated at the end of negotiations. The impact of relational self-construal on relational commitment and that of relational commitment on counterparts’ relational capital are stronger for negotiators from a high (as opposed to low) relational cultural background. Furthermore, intercultural negotiation context, when compared with intracultural context, weakens the impact of relational commitment on relational capital.

Originality/value

This research is among the first to empirically examine the culturally varied relationality in negotiations. The findings offer important theoretical and practical implications regarding how relationality, when interacting with cultural factors, has varying impacts on business negotiations.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article

Junjun Cheng

This paper aims to advance an integrative perspective of dynamic relationality in negotiation research by providing a symbiotic solution to modeling the cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance an integrative perspective of dynamic relationality in negotiation research by providing a symbiotic solution to modeling the cultural adaptation process in intercultural negotiations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a solution-oriented symbiotic approach, the authors analyze negotiators’ combination strategy to propose the dynamic convergence of dyadic relational negotiation behavior (RNB) both as a descriptive framework and a prescriptive solution to behavioral congruence in intercultural negotiations. The authors use spreadsheet platform with artificial data input to simulate various RNB dynamics between negotiators.

Findings

The authors identify the research gap between the arelational, static paradigm in negotiation literature and the relational, dynamic reality in negotiation practices, develop a fourfold typology of the existing negotiation research and propose the construct of RNB. The authors simulate the dyadic dynamics of RNB in a symbiotic framework. Results illustrate varied dyadic patterns of convergent RNB dynamics, demonstrating the effectiveness of the symbiotic solution to achieving behavioral congruence under multiple conditions. Propositions are then presented to predict negotiators’ initial relational behavior, describe dyadic coevolution of RNB in intercultural negotiations and explicate the relevant chronic consequences regarding relational and economic capital.

Originality/value

This paper fills a significant knowledge gap in the extant cross-cultural negotiation literature by addressing dynamic behavioral adaptation through a relational lens. This symbiotic framework is both descriptive in its predictive capacity to simulate the complexity of non-linear negotiation environment, and prescriptive in its directive capacity to guide negotiators’ plan of action given each other’s observed behavior with a probability estimation.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article

Frederik Anseel, Lien Vossaert and Elias Corneillie

This paper aims to extend the argument of DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, who called to bridge the gap between feedback-seeking and feedback-giving research. The paper pushes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the argument of DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, who called to bridge the gap between feedback-seeking and feedback-giving research. The paper pushes their argument further by suggesting that future feedback research should systematically adopt a dyadic and dynamic approach to enhance the understanding of feedback episodes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews previous empirical work in the feedback domain and develops conceptual arguments for linking feedback-seeking and feedback intervention research.

Findings

Drawing upon previous work, the authors conclude that the current depiction of feedback processes in the literature might have been overly static and one-sided. Furthermore, it is argued that feedback research might have not kept up to date with recent conceptual and methodological developments in dyadic organizational behavior research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper builds on the argument of DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, in turn contributing to a more complete picture of how feedback processes unfold in organizations. While this paper profiles a few studies that have begun to bridge the disconnect between feedback-seeking and feedback-giving research, one of its limitations is that it does not adopt a systematic approach in reviewing all potential methodologies.

Originality/value

This paper provides a first step toward studying feedback episodes as dyadic and dynamic processes. In doing so it helps solving one of the long-standing puzzles in management research namely why feedback interventions are sometimes detrimental to performance.

Objetivo

El objetivo de este artículo es extender los argumentos de DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, que hacen un llamamiento para conectar la investigación sobre buscar y ofrecer feedback (retroalimentación). Desarrollamos aún más su propuesta sugiriendo que la investigación futura sobre feedback debe adoptar sistemáticamente una aproximación diádica y dinámica para mejorar nuestra comprensión de los episodios de feedback.

Diseño/metodología/aproximación

El artículo revisa la literatura empírica en el campo del feedback y desarrolla argumentos conceptuales para vincular la investigación en busqueda de feedback e intervenciones de feedback.

Resultados

Sobre los resultados de trabajos previos los autores concluyen que la imagen actual de los procesos de feedback en la literatura es excesivamente estática y desde un solo punto de vista. Es más, se argumenta que la investigación en feedback puede no haber seguido algunos desarrollos conceptuales y metodológicos recientes en la investigación sobre comportamiento organizativo diádico.

Limitaciones/implicaciones

El presente trabajo toma los argumentos de DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson como punto de partida, y con ello contribuye a desarrollar una imagen más completa sobre como los procesos de feedback se despliegan en las organizaciones. Si bien el trabajo comenta algunos trabajos que han comenzado a conectar las hasta la fecha desconectadas literaturas en buscar y ofrecer feedback, su limitación principal reside en que no adopta una revisión sistemática de todas las metodologías potenciales.

Originalidad/valor

El trabajo ofrece un primer paso hace el estudio de los episodios de feedback como procesos diádicos y dinámicos. De este modo contribuye a solventar uno de los retos clásicos en la investigación en gestión: porqué las intervenciones de feedback son en ocasiones negativas para el rendimiento.

Objetivo

Este artigo visa estender o argumento de DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, que preenche a lacuna entre a pesquisa sobre buscar feedback e dar feedback. Nós impulsionamos ainda mais o seu argumento, sugerindo que a futura pesquisa sobre o feedback deve adotar sistematicamente uma abordagem diádica e dinâmica para melhorar nossa compreensão dos episódios de feedback.

Design/metodologia/abordagem

Este artigo revisa o trabalho empírico anterior no domínio do feedback e desenvolve argumentos conceituais para vincular pesquisas de busca de feedback e de intervenção de feedback.

Resultados

Com base em trabalhos anteriores, os autores concluem que a representação atual dos processos de feedback na literatura pode ter sido excessivamente estática e unilateral. Além disso, argumenta-se que a pesquisa de feedback pode não ter se atualizado com desenvolvimentos conceituais e metodológicos recentes na pesquisa do comportamento organizacional diádico.

Limitações/implicações da pesquisa

Este artigo baseia-se no argumento de DeNisi & Smith Sockbeson, contribuindo, por sua vez, para um quadro mais completo de como os processos de feedback se desdobram nas organizações. Enquanto o artigo mapeia alguns estudos que começaram a reduzir a desconexão entre a pequisa sobre buscar e dar feedback, uma de suas limitações é que ela não adota uma abordagem sistemática ao revisar todas as metodologias potenciais.

Originalidade/valor

Este artigo fornece um primeiro passo para o estudo de episódios de feedback como processos diádicos e dinâmicos. Ao fazê-lo, ajuda a resolver um dos quebra-cabeças de longa data na pesquisa em administração, principalmente porque as intervenções de feedback às vezes são prejudiciais ao performance.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article

Md. Moddassir Alam, Pallab Sikdar, Amresh Kumar and Arun Mittal

The study considers a four-construct model for validating the factors of overall patient satisfaction with medication. This paper aims to study the satisfaction of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study considers a four-construct model for validating the factors of overall patient satisfaction with medication. This paper aims to study the satisfaction of patients with their medication. Patient satisfaction with medication influences treatment-related behaviors, such as their possibility of continuing to use their medication, to take their medication correctly and to adhere with medication regimens.

Design/methodology/approach

treatment satisfaction questionnaire for medication (TSQM) version 1.4 patient satisfaction model has been tested for reliability and validity through confirmatory factor analysis. A structured questionnaire, incorporating variables identified from original TSQM version 1.4 (Atkinson et al., 2005), has been used as a survey instrument for the study. Final respondent sample size was 380 patients who were on medication for a minimum duration of 10 days.

Findings

In total, 75 per cent of the willingly participating patients were found to adhere to medication regimen as advised by their physician. Effectiveness, side effects, convenience and global satisfaction were found to be reliable and valid factors for assessing satisfaction with medication among patients in emerging market settings.

Originality/value

The existing studies on measuring patient satisfaction have been majorly confined to developed economies. There is lack of focused research on patient satisfaction and its underlying determinants in the emerging market settings. The present study is an attempt to fill the existing research gap.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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