Search results

1 – 10 of 21
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Achilles A. Armenakis is the James T. Pursell, Sr. Eminent Scholar in the Department of Management at Auburn University. Achilles has published research on diagnosis…

Abstract

Achilles A. Armenakis is the James T. Pursell, Sr. Eminent Scholar in the Department of Management at Auburn University. Achilles has published research on diagnosis, implementation, and evaluation of organizational change. His current research efforts are focused on the readiness, adoption, and institutionalization processes. He is a fellow of the International Academy of Management and of the Southern Management Association.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Achilles A. Armenakis and Stanley G. Harris

Explains how we used the change message components of discrepancy, appropriateness, efficacy, principal support, and personal valence and the message conveying strategies…

Abstract

Explains how we used the change message components of discrepancy, appropriateness, efficacy, principal support, and personal valence and the message conveying strategies of active participation, persuasive communication and management of information suggested by Armenakis and colleagues to help an organization create readiness for a major reorganization. We describe and evaluate our experiences from our initial coaching with the president, through initial management meetings to determine the new business unit’s strategy and structure, to the initial company‐wide announcement of the plans. We conclude with a set of observations and lessons and suggestions for future research on the use of the change message framework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Achilles Armenakis, William Fredenberger, William Giles, Linda Cherones, Hubert Feild and William Holley

Symbols can effectively serve as triggers for cognitive and behavioral change. However, little is known about the use of symbolism in organizational change efforts…

Abstract

Symbols can effectively serve as triggers for cognitive and behavioral change. However, little is known about the use of symbolism in organizational change efforts. Therefore, this study, utilizing a national survey of turnaround change agents (TCAs), investigated their use of verbal, enacted, and material symbols during business turnarounds. Conclusions are drawn concerning the metaphors used to describe the context of the business turnaround and TCAs' usage and rated effectiveness of symbols. It is suggested that multiple symbolism practices should be included in organizational diagnoses.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Daniel T. Holt, Achilles A. Armenakis, Stanley G. Harris and Hubert S. Feild

Although the measurement of organizational readiness for change has been encouraged, measuring readiness for change poses a major empirical challenge. This is not because…

Abstract

Although the measurement of organizational readiness for change has been encouraged, measuring readiness for change poses a major empirical challenge. This is not because instruments designed to do this are not available. Researchers, consultants, and practitioners have published an array of instruments, suggesting that readiness can be measured from various perspectives and the concept of readiness has not been clearly defined. This paper reviews the history of the readiness concept, the perspectives used to assess readiness, and the psychometric properties of readiness instruments. Based on the review, an integrated definition of readiness is presented along with the implications of the definition for research and practice.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

H. Jack Walker, Achilles A. Armenakis and Jeremy B. Bernerth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integrative influence of content, context, process, and individual differences on organizational change efforts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integrative influence of content, context, process, and individual differences on organizational change efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees involved in a recent de‐merger. Using structural equation modeling, a hypothesized model that integrated individual differences with change content, context, and process factors was tested.

Findings

Results led to the acceptance of a model indicating that change context mediated the relationship between individual differences and change process and content. Similarly, change content and process mediated the relationship between change context and organizational change commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the nature of the study, inferences of causality cannot be made. Additionally, common method bias may be a concern because criterion and response variables were collected at the same time.

Practical implications

An organization's prior change history (i.e. context) has the potential to negatively influence change success. In order to counteract these effects, change agents should concentrate on clearly communicating the change details (i.e. process) to employees.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to integrate factors common to all change efforts, i.e. content, context, process and individual differences. Further, it elaborates on how these factors interact to influence change success.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Achilles A. Armenakis, J. Don Flowers, Henry B. Burdg, Kimberly M. Kuerten, Sammy O. McCord and H. David Arnold

A nation′s capacity to compete in international markets isinfluenced by a number of factors including R&D expenditures,radical innovation, productivity, machine tool…

Abstract

A nation′s capacity to compete in international markets is influenced by a number of factors including R&D expenditures, radical innovation, productivity, machine tool production and patents. The United States′ declining capacity to dominate selected markets is related to reductions in these factors. Although one can argue that, in general, the managerial practices of business executives are responsible for that decline, a number of more specific causes are isolated. It is argued that the quickest solution to the competitiveness situation is through proactive business extension programmes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2000

Achilles A. Armenakis, Stanley G. Harris and Hubert S. Feild

Increasing global competition has accelerated the rate of organizational changes, such as reengineering, restructuring, and downsizing. As a result, organizational leaders…

Abstract

Increasing global competition has accelerated the rate of organizational changes, such as reengineering, restructuring, and downsizing. As a result, organizational leaders find themselves faced with growing cynicism among employees that the current wave of changes is nothing more than the program of the month that will pass as those that preceded it. We address the issue of how to make changes permanent by providing a model developed from theory and research on organizational change and from successful practices implemented in numerous organizations worldwide. The model can serve at least three purposes. First, the model can assist change agents in planning for and assessing progress toward institutionalizing organizational change. Second, the model can help focus efforts of organizational scholars to study the change process. Third, the model offers the basis for hypothesis testing regarding the success or failure of change efforts.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-041-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Jeremy B. Bernerth, Achilles A. Armenakis, Hubert S. Feild, William F. Giles and H. Jack Walker

The paper seeks to investigate whether or not leader‐member exchange (LMX) is influenced by the personality of subordinates and/or supervisors.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate whether or not leader‐member exchange (LMX) is influenced by the personality of subordinates and/or supervisors.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous literature from the general leadership, personality, and LMX domains was used as a theoretical background for proposing certain types of relationships between the personality traits that make up the Big Five and employees’ perceptions of LMX. Personality data were collected from 195 matched pairs of employees and supervisors. LMX data were collected from 195 employees. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Employees' conscientiousness, extroversion, openness, and neuroticism were found to impact perceptions of LMX. Likewise, supervisors' conscientiousness and agreeableness also impacted employees' perceptions of LMX.

Research limitations/implications

The present study included two potential research limitations. First, personality was measured using the short‐version of the NEO‐FFI; thus, we were unable to run analysis at the facet level. Second, although we did have two sources of data (i.e. the supervisor and subordinate), there is a possibility that common method variance may have influenced some of the hypothesized relationships.

Practical implications

Results indicate there may be a dispositional basis to perceptions of LMX. Thus, the relationship between LMX and outcome variables (i.e. performance, turnover, satisfaction, etc.) may be only part of the story. Practitioners that want to maximize the relationship between employees and their supervisors would be well served to actively consider personality issues. In particular, some employees and some supervisors appear to be more willing to engage in exchanges than others.

Originality/value

As far as we know, this is the first study to investigate the influence of personality from two sources (i.e. the supervisor and subordinate) on LMX. It moves beyond the traditional study of demographic similarity.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Volume 16 of Research in Organizational Change and Development highlights several emerging trends in our field and in the world within which our research takes place. The…

Abstract

Volume 16 of Research in Organizational Change and Development highlights several emerging trends in our field and in the world within which our research takes place. The papers that make up this volume hit on some familiar topics, all related to the challenge of invoking, supporting, or measuring organizational change but they also go farther than that. In Volume 16, we see evidence that the issues of concern to leaders and researchers are becoming increasingly global in nature. In order to understand these issues, we must pay attention to cultural differences, and the language that is used during change interventions to set expectations and deal with the myriad issues that threaten to undermine the success of the effort. In this volume too we see that different types of organizations approach change in ways that reflect their unique cultures and contexts. Rather than a one size fits all approach, authors of papers in this volume call for an understanding of these differences among organizational types and their implications for how we approach organizational change. The role of the leader in change is also examined in several papers here. We have known for a long time that leadership is essential during change, but these papers give us a fresh look at what it is that leaders do and say that affects the outcomes achieved. Finally, as always, we see included in Volume 16 some excellent contributions to methodology and research on the topic of change. Each of the papers in Volume 16 is well-crafted, thoughtful and very much worth the time to read.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

1 – 10 of 21