Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Christopher Prince

This paper explores the increasingly important issue of the accreditation of work‐based learning for the award of university level qualifications and divided into a number…

Abstract

This paper explores the increasingly important issue of the accreditation of work‐based learning for the award of university level qualifications and divided into a number of sections. Defines accreditation and explores its historical development in the UK. This is followed by a review of the various types of accreditation options that are open to organisations drawing on real life case histories. Concludes by highlighting a number of factors client organisations and providers should take into account when considering accrediting corporate training and development activities.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

John McAleer and Gerry McAleavy

The results of an investigation into the possibilities with regardto the accreditation of the prior achievements of instructors incommunity workshops in Northern Ireland…

Abstract

The results of an investigation into the possibilities with regard to the accreditation of the prior achievements of instructors in community workshops in Northern Ireland are detailed. A number of instructors were interviewed to determine whether they would be interested in accreditation and what kinds of evidence of prior achievement they would be able to offer. It was found that instructors would welcome the introduction of an accreditation procedure but that, in most cases, they would be unable to supply documentary evidence of prior achievements. It is suggested that managers of further education colleges should make provision for accreditation, as this will be an important source of clients in the future provided that they are able to offer appropriate facilities in terms of counselling and assessment of experiential learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Jonathan Garnett and Angele Cavaye

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for…

Abstract

Purpose

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for uncertificated but planned learning is given academic recognition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper refers to international developments in RPL and then focuses upon the extensive and innovative use of RPL by Middlesex University and the developing RPL work at the Australian Institute of Business.

Findings

The Middlesex experience of recognition of learning from experience as part of the development of customised work-based learning programmes demonstrates the potential of RPL for business and management programmes.

Originality/value

The use of RPL for admission and/or credit in standard programmes enables individuals to have their work-based knowledge acknowledged as relevant, worthwhile and equivalent to learning obtained in the higher education classroom.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Paul Carr

This paper discusses the academic, governmental and logistical issues surrounding the University of Glamorgan’s recent involvement in developing accredited training and…

Abstract

This paper discusses the academic, governmental and logistical issues surrounding the University of Glamorgan’s recent involvement in developing accredited training and education for one of the largest music technology manufacturers in the world – Roland UK. The paper reports the joint development of a Foundation Degree in Music Retail Management, reflecting upon the viability of implementing work based learning (WBL), including accrediting current training and prior learning (APL). Through analysing the early stages of the project, the paper aims to formulate a clearer perspective of what the University of Glamorgan and Roland UK, in addition to the government and the music retail industry, actually require from a foundation degree such as this. After presenting a synopsis of the current political climate and contextualising the existing status of musical instrument retail training, an overview is provided of the development of the Roland/Glamorgan partnership. This is followed by a discussion of the philosophical debates and mechanisms currently surrounding the implementation and accreditation of WBL. The paper cumulates with the development of a pedagogical model that takes into account the quality issues of both the University of Glamorgan and Roland UK in addition to government policy. Conclusions are then drawn regarding the importance of both institutions developing appropriate structural capital and being aware of cultural differences that can potentially restrict academic/industrial partnerships. Although this pilot was focused specifically upon Roland UK, its wider implications, in terms of the demand for accredited training for the music instrument retail industry, are considered.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Pauline Armsby

The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the issues related to enabling the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) in doctoral level awards, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the issues related to enabling the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) in doctoral level awards, and illustrate the effects for candidates, others involved in the process and higher education (HE).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a mainly qualitative evaluation study of those involved with 12 graduates from a professional doctorate that uses an in‐depth reflective and critical analysis of prior high level work based learning as its main product for assessment. In‐depth semi‐structured telephone interviews, focus group and questionnaires were used to gather data from candidates, their advisers and consultants, internal and external examiners, and chairs of their presentation.

Findings

Findings included the development of understanding about work‐based epistemologies by all the participants and changes in the candidates' understanding of their professional identity. The recognition of scholarliness and the evaluation and accreditation of professional knowledge was a key issue for external examiners.

Research limitations/implications

As a small‐scale evaluation case study the results are indicative and presented alongside experience of facilitating and assessing prior learning in this UK‐based professional doctorate, in order to stimulate further discussion.

Practical implications

APEL is a valuable and valued, student‐centred learning and teaching method for experienced professionals that could provide a useful entrée to other pedagogies that develop a personal understanding of professional knowledge production and ability to reflect on practice.

Originality/value

The paper provides some evidence for claims in the current literature that there is an important place for work‐based knowledge in contemporary HE. The pedagogic processes described in this paper appear to work effectively with doctoral level candidates.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Anne‐Juliette Lecourt

The purpose of this paper is to analyze employees’ trajectories within the Accreditation of Prior Experience Learning process (APEL) in France. It seeks to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze employees’ trajectories within the Accreditation of Prior Experience Learning process (APEL) in France. It seeks to understand how candidates implement this right, the resources and supports required to manage this implementation, and how employer‐employee relationships impact on the end result.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a new national survey of more than 3,000 employed APEL candidates, most of whom are women working in the care sector.

Findings

The paper argues that individual pathways within this process are influenced more by the socio‐economic issues at stake in a given sector, its certification policies, environmental incentives and employer‐employee joint investments than by individual characteristics. All these elements go to configure a “capability pathway”, comprising individual resources, rights, and environmental, social and individual conversion factors.

Practical implications

A better understanding of employers’ role and the support they provide during the course of the overall process can help increase the efficiency of lifelong learning. Spaces of mediation at candidates’ disposal and real freedom at work, such as exercising one's right to voice and aspiring to development, are determinant.

Originality/value

Not much is known about how corporate policies affect individual employee pathways within the framework of the Accreditation of Prior Experience Learning (APEL) process in France. The paper contributes to this literature by using a recent survey econometrically investigating the impact of joint employer‐employee investment.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

David Davies

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As…

Abstract

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As we move towards the new millennium, the development of national, yet diversified, credit frameworks and systems will provide an essential underpinning for the organisational culture that will be needed to sustain the wellbeing and growth of the educational system. These new systems are already being incorporated into the practice of ‘virtual’ education. Lifelong learning has widespread support across the social and political spectrum and its importance can hardly be over‐stated as we seek to maintain competitiveness in a changing world. Increasing knowledge and understanding to serve both the needs of the economy and of individuals to play a major role in democratic life has become an agenda of necessity as well as desire. An open society requires open systems of knowledge. A prognosis for the future is submitted where the significance of part‐time modular and open flexible learning is evaluated in terms of a curriculum rooted in useful knowledge and competences, acquired at different sites of learning, including the workplace. It is argued that modular structures, using the potential offered by credit accumulation and transfer to different institutions with different missions, can transcend and transform the learning opportunities for students in a mass system of higher education which is rapidly becoming part of a global market economy and society. Continuous lifelong learning involving its key features of open access, recognition of learning wherever it takes place and the growth of new learning networks and partnerships, is at the conceptual heart of the development of the virtual university.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Shirley Fletcher

Accreditation of prior learning (APL) is the formal assessment andcertification of employees′ and job seekers′ existing skills andknowledge in accordance with nationally…

Abstract

Accreditation of prior learning (APL) is the formal assessment and certification of employees′ and job seekers′ existing skills and knowledge in accordance with nationally recognised standards of occupational competence. The potential role of APL in making maximum effective use of existing national resources and in encouraging adults to acquire new skills is assessed. The relevance of APL in closing the “skills gap” and in tapping the adult labour market is examined. The UK Government′s APL initiatives are reviewed including the implementation of two, two‐year programmes. Colleges, employers and organisations in the public and private sectors are all interested in taking APL further but the real costs are still to be examined, an institutional model is yet to be established and the required infrastructure needs to be put in place nationally.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Heather Skinner, Haydn Blackey and Peter J. Green

Higher education institutions (HEIs) can face barriers implementing the accreditation of informal learning, despite many institutions having developed policies and…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) can face barriers implementing the accreditation of informal learning, despite many institutions having developed policies and strategies to embed employability and skills. The purpose of this paper is to present the case of the institutional response of one HEI when dealing with the various drivers and challenges faced when accrediting informal learning at higher levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach was adopted as this method allowed for in‐depth qualitative enquiry into a contemporary phenomenon in a real‐life context.

Findings

The paper finds that by designing a shell framework incorporating module outlines and a toolkit of support materials for various stakeholder groups, HEIs may overcome many of the implementation problems often associated with HE accreditation of informal higher level learning.

Practical implications

This framework and toolkit approach could help other HEIs better enable the wider accreditation and embedding of work‐based learning within HE, which is deemed so important in facilitating the achievement of UK Government targets for 40 per cent of UK adults to gain a qualification at Level 4 or above in the next ten years. This is also a particular issue for Wales, dealing with its own skills agenda in response to specific skills gaps needed to ensure the sustainable future of the Welsh economy.

Originality/value

While a limited number of HEIs have adopted a framework approach to the accreditation of work‐based learning, this paper addresses the issues in a regional context, as the framework and toolkit presented is the first of its kind to be articulated for the Welsh skills agenda by a Welsh HEI.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Richard Dealtry

This article considers the role of learning validation and accreditation systems in relation to the demand for more co‐creative quality assurance solutions in corporate…

Abstract

This article considers the role of learning validation and accreditation systems in relation to the demand for more co‐creative quality assurance solutions in corporate and organisational learning management. It explores the need to emphasise the organisational demand side in the management of quality new learning by applying a more holistic development perspective. It looks at the subject of credit frameworks from the point of view of both providers and consumers of learning programmes and develops a more radical four dimensional management perspective that extends the reach of considerations beyond the two dimensions of academic and professional practice. It introduces a leadership‐inspired career‐based accreditation system that engages with the middle and upper tiers in organisational learning. It provides this as a basis for developing a methodology and a forward thinking guideline for learning portfolio practice and quality assurance accreditation management in the organisational setting.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000