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Pamela Loprest and Elaine Maag

This paper examines barriers to work among adults with disabilities in two specific areas – searching for jobs and workplace accommodations – using data from the 1994/1995…

Abstract

This paper examines barriers to work among adults with disabilities in two specific areas – searching for jobs and workplace accommodations – using data from the 1994/1995 National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement. Focusing on a subgroup of “work-oriented” persons, the paper finds that difficulties in looking for work are widespread, encountered by more than half of our sample of non-workers with disabilities. While there are a variety of reasons people report for being discouraged in looking for work, lack of appropriate jobs, lack of information about appropriate jobs, and transportation problems are frequently cited. Those with lower levels of education, less previous work experience, and more severe activity limitations have the most difficulty searching for jobs. We also find that about one-third of our work-oriented non-working sample of adults with disabilities report needing workplace accommodations. The most common specific needs are special work site features such as accessible parking, transportation, elevators, and modified work stations. While a greater proportion of non-workers need more accommodations than workers, the types of accommodations most frequently needed are similar. We also find that even after controlling for severity of limitations and demographic characteristics, reporting a need for accommodation is still negatively correlated with the probability of working.

Details

Using Survey Data to Study Disability: Results from the National Health Survey on Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-007-4

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Article

Robin Johnson

Four routes or pathways have now been identified by which individuals may come within the scope of PSA 16 National Indicator 149, which is concerned with monitoring…

Abstract

Four routes or pathways have now been identified by which individuals may come within the scope of PSA 16 National Indicator 149, which is concerned with monitoring efforts to achieve settled accommodation for individuals with significant mental health problems. This article focuses on their needs and the identification of those with mental health needs as seen through these four principal routes. An understanding of these four possible pathways can help to identify areas for priority action, local delivery chains and partnerships, and also highlight some of the challenges and risks in and for delivery.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

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Article

Carrye Syma

The subject of invisible disabilities is becoming more prevalent in the workplace. Invisible disabilities (as defined by the Invisible Disabilities Association) refers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The subject of invisible disabilities is becoming more prevalent in the workplace. Invisible disabilities (as defined by the Invisible Disabilities Association) refers to symptoms such as “debilitating pain, fatigue, dizziness, cognitive dysfunctions, brain injuries, learning differences and mental health disorders, as well as hearing and vision impairments.” There are times when employees are hesitant to disclose their invisible disability to their employer or coworkers, which means that accommodations for disabilities may not be requested or made. Accommodations made in the workplace for invisible disabilities can include flexible schedule, special software for assisting with scheduling or prioritizing tasks, or architectural changes such as a standing desk. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

For this literature review, articles on invisible disabilities and accommodations were researched and used to support the importance of accommodations in the workplace.

Findings

Invisible disabilities are affecting the workplace and must be addressed. Those struggling with invisible disabilities need to consider sharing information about their disability with their employer as well as requesting accommodation. The question of whether or not to inform coworkers should be left to individual employees and what they feel comfortable divulging. More research needs to be done on how to create learning opportunities and sensitivity in the workplace to those with invisible disabilities. Perhaps training should be offered at the time a new employee begins work.

Originality/value

This literature review is of value because it speaks to an important issue facing today’s workplaces – invisible disabilities and accommodations. Mental illnesses are an invisible disability and as more people are diagnosed and enter the workforce, employers are faced with an increasing demand to meet the needs of these workers. Educating employers and employees on the topic of invisible disabilities and accommodations paves the way to a greater and more productive workforce.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Ronald Beckers, Dorotheus van der Voordt and Geert Dewulf

This paper aims to explore the management strategies of facility managers and corporate real estate managers to align corporate real estate (CRE) with the needs of their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the management strategies of facility managers and corporate real estate managers to align corporate real estate (CRE) with the needs of their organization and the end users in a changing context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first outlines the theoretical issues of CRE alignment processes and the management of accommodation needs. It then presents the findings from a multiple case study in 14 Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) from the perspective of the CRE/facility management (FM) manager. The empirical study is based on interviews and a questionnaire.

Findings

The theory shows three key process activities in managing the alignment of CRE with the needs of end users and the organization as a whole: coordination, communication and decision-making. The way organizations manage these process activities can be represented by eight opposite perspectives. These eight perspectives refer to two management strategies for CREM departments: an involvement-oriented strategy and a control-oriented strategy.

Practical implications

The distinguished eight management perspectives and two management strategies can be used by CRE/FM managers to reconsider their current approach for aligning CRE with the needs and requirements of the client, customers and end users. This is to improve the match between demand and supply to find future-proof accommodation solutions.

Originality/value

CREM issues and the effect of CRE on students and staff and vice versa is an underexposed topic in research in the field of higher education. There is still limited understanding of how to optimally align school buildings with education. The current study combines insights from other disciplines such as management and organization and information technology-alignment with insights from CREM theory.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article

Dwayne Van Eerd, Julie Bowring, Arif Jetha, F. Curtis Breslin and Monique A.M. Gignac

The purpose of this research was to conduct an environmental scan describing publicly available resources focussed on working with an episodic disability and providing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to conduct an environmental scan describing publicly available resources focussed on working with an episodic disability and providing information and advice about communication and accommodation to support working people living with episodic disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an environmental scan of English language, freely available, online resources relevant to episodic disabilities in the workplace. The authors used Google™ to conduct structured keyword searches. Resources were reviewed and data extracted about episodic health condition(s) addressed, intended audience(s), resource format and content about health, legal rights, workplace issues, and accommodation and communication needs.

Findings

Searches yielded 5,300 links to websites which was supplemented by 101 links identified by partners. Screening for relevance found 210 resources for which data were extracted. Of them, 158 addressed specific episodic disabilities or episodic disabilities generally. Most resources provided useful information addressing communication and accommodation of episodic disability. However, information specific to the episodic nature of disability was not consistently available. The resources generally lacked interactivity which could potentially limit users in applying the information to their personal circumstances.

Practical implications

The findings suggest there are good resources to help workers and managers/supervisors navigate accommodations for episodic disabilities. Research should aim to improve the interactivity of information to personalize resources to worker and workplace needs, as well as formally evaluate resources and their outcomes. Practitioners may wish to recommend resources that specifically address workplace challenges for their clients.

Originality/value

The authors believe this is one of few studies that examined publicly available resources relevant to working with episodic disabilities.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article

Mark Colman, Amy Hebblethwaite, Annette Hames, Alison Forsyth and Martin Donkin

People who are homeless and have a learning disability tend to be more vulnerable and have greater health needs than homeless people who do not have a learning disability…

Abstract

People who are homeless and have a learning disability tend to be more vulnerable and have greater health needs than homeless people who do not have a learning disability (Leedham, 2002). However, the literature on the experiences of this population is very limited. This paper investigates the experiences and views of professionals from a range of settings who work with people who are homeless and have a learning disability. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 23 professionals working for health, social care, probation, employment and voluntary agencies. Professionals described how people who are homeless and have a learning disability have a range of complex personal, health and social needs that are often not met by current accommodation and support provision. Improvements to the quality of temporary accommodation and the on‐site support offered are needed in order to react effectively to episodes of homelessness. In addition, improvements in the quality of outreach support and a greater choice of suitable housing might help to prevent homelessness among this client group. Another paper on a difference aspect of this research (Hebblethwaite et al, this issue) will report on the personal experiences of homeless people with a learning disability.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part

Delia Lomax

The historical relationship between the state and Gypsy/Travellers in the UK and Europe has been a difficult one. Cultural differences, particularly in relation to…

Abstract

The historical relationship between the state and Gypsy/Travellers in the UK and Europe has been a difficult one. Cultural differences, particularly in relation to nomadism and sedentarism lie at the centre of this fraught relationship (Acton, 1997; Liégeois, 2005; McVeigh, 1997; Molloy, 1998). Some commentators have gone as far as to suggest that policies directed at Gypsy/Travellers amount to a form of ‘ethnic cleansing’ (Hawes & Perez, 1996). This is not only a matter of history but refers to current legislation, policy and the experience of hostile responses from the settled community and the media (Clark & Greenfields, 2006; Richardson, 2006). Clark (2008) argues that in Britain and Ireland these tensions are shaped by ‘core dichotomies’ and in the context of social policy one such dichotomy is that between ‘care’ and ‘control’. While the current housing and planning policy agenda seeks to improve safety and security in the provision of appropriate accommodation, addressing the needs of Gypsy/Travellers, the tendency to control through monitoring and regulation is also evident (Clark & Greenfields, 2006; Richardson, 2006). It is, therefore, unsurprising that, in the midst of such enduring hostility from the state, authorities and the settled community and tensions and confusion in policy, there may be some reluctance to engage with researchers, especially but not just when they are commissioned to undertake the research on behalf of national and local government.

Details

Qualitative Housing Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-990-6

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Article

Christopher Edmunds and Kerry KilBride

The purpose of this paper is to recount 12 months of a pioneering collaboration between the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, five local authorities and nine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to recount 12 months of a pioneering collaboration between the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, five local authorities and nine registered social landlords in South East Wales. It will aim to share the understanding that has emerged, demonstrating how a large number of agencies, many of which have different purposes or which have traditionally been in competition with each other, have been able to work collaboratively, to meet the interests of some very vulnerable people.

Design/methodology/approach

This reflective approach draws on the views of a large number of staff from each of the three constituent public sector service areas and their experience of collaborative working using action research principles. The study will use people’s own words to highlight real experiences, but analysed against similar collaborative activity elsewhere reflected in the literature. As there has been no established pathway for the collaboration to follow, we have adopted a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle to capture the evolving “In One Place” (IOP) process.

Findings

This paper highlights the inherent systemic barriers that have to be identified and overcome if the authors are to move from wishful thinking to pragmatic realism, both within and between organisations. The sense of public sector agencies being able to work together, simply because it makes good sense, is challenged and the paper identifies both cultural and professional factors that made a difference in this collaboration, which could be harnessed elsewhere.

Originality/value

From the outset, a key driver for the IOP has been to align health, social care and housing processes by bringing together practitioners and senior managers to identify need and to plan and deliver services locally, offering a real benefit to individuals with complex needs. This is set within the context of increasing demand on public services, financial austerity and the history of “housing” being on the margins of discussion when considering the integration of health and social care services. The authors are able to demonstrate the benefit of housing being at the centre of such discussions.

Diben

Mae’r astudiaeth hon yn adrodd hanes deuddeg mis cyntaf cydweithrediad arloesol rhwng Bwrdd Iechyd Prifysgol Aneurin Bevan (ABMUHB), pum Awdurdod Lleol a naw Landlord Cymdeithasol Cofrestredig (RSL) yn Ne Ddwyrain Cymru. Nod yr astudiaeth hon fydd rhannu’r ddealltwriaeth sydd wedi dod i’r amlwg yn dangos sut mae nifer fawr o asiantaethau, llawer ohonynt â dibenion gwahanol neu sydd wedi bod mewn cystadleuaeth â’i gilydd yn draddodiadol, wedi gallu gweithio’n gydweithredol, i fodloni budd rhai pobl agored iawn i niwed.

Cynllun/methodoleg/dull

Mae’r dull adlewyrchol hwn yn defnyddio safbwynt nifer fawr o staff o bob un o 3 maes gwasanaeth sector cyhoeddus yr etholaeth a’u profiad o weithio’n gydweithredol gan ddefnyddio egwyddorion ymchwil weithredol. Bydd yr astudiaeth yn defnyddio geiriau pobl i amlygu profiadau gwirioneddol, ond wedi ei ddadansoddi yn erbyn gweithgaredd cydweithredol tebyg sydd wedi ei adlewyrchu rhywle arall yn y llenyddiaeth. Gan nad oes unrhyw lwybr wedi ei sefydlu i’r gydweithrediaeth ei ddilyn, rydym wedi mabwysiadu cylch Cynllunio-Gwneud-Astudio-Gweithredu (CGAG) i gyfleu’r broses ‘Mewn Un Lle’ sy’n esblygu.

Canfyddiadau

Mae’r erthygl hon yn amlygu’r rhwystrau systemig cynhenid y mae’n rhaid eu nodi a’u goresgyn er mwyn symud o ddymuno i realaeth ymarferol, o fewn a rhwng sefydliadau. Mae’r syniad bod asiantaethau’r sector cyhoeddus yn gallu cydweithio, dim ond am fod hynny’n gwneud synnwyr, yn cael ei herio ac mae’r papur yn nodi ffactorau diwylliannol a phroffesiynol a wnaeth wahaniaeth yn y cydweithrediad hwn, y gellid eu defnyddio rhywle arall.

Gwreiddioldeb/gwerth

O’r cychwyn, ysgogwr allweddol ar gyfer y rhaglen ‘Mewn Un Lle’ oedd alinio prosesau iechyd, gofal cymdeithasol a thai trwy ddod ag ymarferwyr ac uwch reolwyr o’r sectorau gwahanol hyn ynghyd i nodi angen ac i gynllunio a chyflenwi gwasanaethau yn lleol, pan fo hynny o fudd gwirioneddol i unigolion ag anghenion cymhleth. Mae hyn wedi ei nodi o fewn cyd-destun cynyddu’r galw am wasanaethau cyhoeddus, cynildeb ariannol a hanes ‘tai’ ar ymylon trafodaeth wrth ystyried integreiddio gwasanaethau iechyd a gofal cymdeithasol. Yn yr enghraifft hon rydym yn gallu dangos buddion gwneud tai yn ganolog i drafodaethau o’r fath.

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Article

Leonieke Boendermaker

In the Netherlands young people with a child protection measure can be admitted to juvenile justice institutions in special cases. Since 2001 there has been a sudden rise…

Abstract

In the Netherlands young people with a child protection measure can be admitted to juvenile justice institutions in special cases. Since 2001 there has been a sudden rise in the number of child protection admissions. This article describes a needs analysis of the child protection cases and shows how the identification of need profiles can provide clues for the development of services. An important outcome of the needs analysis is the urgent need for new services for young people with a conduct disorder, with residential as well as non‐residential with (intensive) family interventions as a central element.Due to political and media attention on the subject, the government plans to spread intensive family interventions over the country and finances have become available to develop five new residential settings. The focus on the use of security in handling this group of young people is also discussed.

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Abstract

Details

The Inclusive Management Strategy: Engineering Culture Change for Employees with DisAbilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-195-5

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