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1 – 10 of over 42000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Evert Van de Vliert, Ken‐ichi Ohbuchi, Bas Van Rossum, Yoichiro Hayashi and Gerben S. Van der Vegt

Do accommodative or integrative components make contentious conflict behavior more effective? A questionnaire study shows that Japanese subordinates (N = 136) handle…

Abstract

Do accommodative or integrative components make contentious conflict behavior more effective? A questionnaire study shows that Japanese subordinates (N = 136) handle interpersonal conflicts with superiors more effectively to the extent that they complement high contending with high accommodating. By contrast, prior research shows that high contending by Dutch subordinates and superiors is more effective if complemented with high integrating. Together, these findings support the notion that the most effective conglomeration of contending with other components of conflict behavior is society‐specific.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

E. Anne Bardoel

Examines the relative importance of institutional and resource dependent explanations versus managerial explanations of variations of formal and informal work‐family…

2083

Abstract

Examines the relative importance of institutional and resource dependent explanations versus managerial explanations of variations of formal and informal work‐family responsiveness. Work‐family responsiveness is defined in two ways: formal policies and practices that an organization offers, designed to assist employees to balance their work and family lives; and a work environment that is accommodating of its employees’ work‐family needs. Focuses attention on the important role that managerial attitudes have on the provision of work‐family practices and an accommodating work‐family workplace. Concludes that by integrating the insights of several theoretical perspectives, a more comprehensive model of organizational responsiveness in relation to work‐family practices is developed and a set of testable propositions that can guide future research can be made. Indicates that an additive theoretical model combining managerial and institutional factors offers the most appropriate theoretical explanation for identifying factors related to the provision of work‐family benefits and whether the workplace is accommodating of work‐family issues.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Arménio Rego, Regina Leite, Teresa Carvalho, Carla Freire and Armando Vieira

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the three‐dimensional model of organizational commitment proposed by Meyer and Allen (e.g., 1991). It focuses on…

2042

Abstract

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the three‐dimensional model of organizational commitment proposed by Meyer and Allen (e.g., 1991). It focuses on whether continuance commitment should be considered one‐dimensional or bidimensional (low alternatives; high sacrifices). Whether affective commitment should be divided into two components (affective commitment; future in common) or if it should remain as a one‐dimensional construct is also discussed. The paper also considers a “new” factor identified by Rego (2003), which he named “psychological absence”, but which we denominated here as accommodating commitment. Besides the confirmatory factor analysis, the paper shows how four dimensions of organizational justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational) explain organizational commitment. The sample comprises 366 individuals from 22 organizations operating in Portugal. The predictive value of the justice perceptions for both instrumental commitment components is quite weak, despite ranging from 25 per cent to 36 per cent for the other components. Procedural and interpersonal justice are the main predictors. The accommodating dimension improves the fit indices of the factorial model, but its meaning is not clear. It is also not clear whether one should consider it as a new component of commitment or whether its items should be removed from the measuring instruments. The findings suggest that some gains can be achieved in the partition of the affective and instrumental commitment, but further research is necessary to clarify the issue.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Piyawan Charoensap-Kelly

This study drew on the core concerns framework (CCF) and communication accommodation theory (CAT) to examine the direct and indirect effects of manager core concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

This study drew on the core concerns framework (CCF) and communication accommodation theory (CAT) to examine the direct and indirect effects of manager core concerns accommodativeness on employee integrative (i.e. cooperative) intention through the mediating role of positive emotional change and manager credibility (i.e. competence, trustworthiness and goodwill). Core concerns accommodativeness refers to the degree to which one responds to another’s socio-psychological needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental design was used. A total of 339 working adults from various industries in the USA took an online questionnaire composed of manipulations, closed-ended and open-ended questions. Quantitative data was analyzed using a series of mediation analyses and triangulated with qualitative data.

Findings

The results showed that both accommodating and overaccommodating manager messages significantly improved employees’ emotional state, perception of manager credibility and integrative intention more than the underaccommodating message. Importantly, the manager communication accommodativeness increases employees’ positive emotional change which heightened the employees’ perception of manager trustworthiness which then stimulated employees’ integrative intention. Qualitative data surprisingly revealed that the overaccommodating message was regarded predominantly positively.

Originality/value

The mixed-methods approach of this study added deeper insight into the role of communication accommodation and emotion in supervisor-subordinate conflict negotiation, extending both the CCF and CAT literature. The findings also inform managers about how to effectively use the core concerns.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Richard A. Posthuma, George O. White, James B. Dworkin, Oscar Yánez and Maris Stella Swift

The purpose of this study is to investigate how national culture and proximity to national borders can influence the conflict styles that co‐workers use between themselves.

3265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how national culture and proximity to national borders can influence the conflict styles that co‐workers use between themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

In this experiment, samples were drawn from regions near the US Mexican border further north in the USA and further South in Mexico. Total n=549. Participants were presented with different conflict styles of co‐workers and asked how they would respond. A new measure of national origin was developed and used to assess affinity with a particular culture based on familial lineage.

Findings

This study shows that conflict resolution styles of co‐workers in the USA are different from those in Mexico. Culture also moderates the relationship among the conflict resolution styles of the co‐workers themselves. Mexicans were generally more contending and less yielding to co‐workers than Americans. However, Mexicans were also more likely than Americans to respond to contending co‐workers by accommodating or by compromising with the co‐worker. National Origin and border location influenced choice of conflict resolution styles in both American and Mexican workers.

Originality/value

Proximity to national borders can influence degrees of cultural identity, which can in turn, influence preferred conflict styles. Degrees of national cultural identity can be measured using familial lineage.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Onne Janssen and Evert van de Vliert

A hidden issue is whether the more de‐escalatory behavior of cooperatively‐motivated compared to competitively‐motivated conflict parties is the result of less concern for…

1173

Abstract

A hidden issue is whether the more de‐escalatory behavior of cooperatively‐motivated compared to competitively‐motivated conflict parties is the result of less concern for one's own goals, more concern for the other's goals, or both. A scenario study and a simulation experiment among undergraduate students confirmed the hypothesis that the difference in other‐concern is the critical explanator. The stronger other‐concern of cooperatively‐motivated compared to competitively motivated parties fostered more accommodating, more problem solving, more compromising, and less forcing, resulting in more de‐escalation or less escalation.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Sigrit Altmäe, Kulno Türk and Ott‐Siim Toomet

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between Thomas‐Kilmann's Conflict Management Modes (CMM) and Fiedler's Leadership Style (LS) measures, both in the…

5733

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between Thomas‐Kilmann's Conflict Management Modes (CMM) and Fiedler's Leadership Style (LS) measures, both in the data, and from the theoretical perspective. Based on the conceptual similarities, the authors first propose the existence of a relationship between Thomas‐Kilmann's CMM and Fiedler's LS measures, then establish the presence of the relationship, based on a dataset of Estonian managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a unique dataset of 343 leaders and specialists from different Estonian organizations, on both Thomas‐Kilmann's CMM and Fiedler's Least Preferred Co‐worker test. The data were analyzed by multivariate methods.

Findings

The results indicate that leaders who are task‐oriented, according to Fiedler's model, tend to use more competing as the dominant CMM, while relationship‐oriented leaders are more accommodating. The authors also analyze the effect of individual characteristics, finding that younger managers are more task‐oriented while older ones are typically relationship‐oriented and conflict avoiding; women are more collaborative and less conflict avoiding, and men tend to use the accommodating mode more than women. Surprisingly, women tend to be more competitive.

Originality/value

This is the first study to establish a relationship between Fiedler's Leadership Style and Thomas‐Kilmann's Conflict Mode Instrument. This relationship can potentially be used for assessing the reliability and validity of measurements. The particular shape of it may be used to analyze the links between conflicts, relationships and assertiveness. Additionally, the paper provides an empirical analysis of conflict management habits and leadership styles of Estonian managers.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Oluwakemi Gbadamosi, Abbas Ghanbari Baghestan and Khalil Al-Mabrouk

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the conflict resolution styles used by university students in handling conflicts, and to determine the effects (if any) of age…

3946

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the conflict resolution styles used by university students in handling conflicts, and to determine the effects (if any) of age, nationality and gender on how students respond to conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

The Thomas-Kilmann conflict mode instrument was adopted to assess the conflict resolution styles (accommodating, avoiding, collaborative, competitive and compromising) of post graduate students in a University in Malaysia. Both ANOVA and t-test analyses were utilized to investigate the relationship between, nationality, gender, age and conflict resolution styles used by students.

Findings

Results of this study indicates that female students used competitive style more than male students, while male students are more likely to avoid conflicts. The older students were discovered to use more avoiding, while younger students are more likely to be competitive in nature. The findings did not reveal any significant differences in nationality.

Originality/value

This paper expands its focus from gender (which is the most commonly tested category) to other categories such as age and nationality, thereby giving room for these new categories to be tested extensively in future researches. The results reveal that students not only use different conflict resolution styles to address conflicts, but also there exists differences in the styles used by students of different age groups and gender.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Shun Ye, Honggen Xiao, Tianyu Ying and Lingqiang Zhou

This paper aims to model and empirically test the determinants of small accommodation business (SAB) size.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model and empirically test the determinants of small accommodation business (SAB) size.

Design/methodology/approach

This study distinguishes among three aspects of SAB size (accommodation scale, investment and employment) and between two modes of growth (managerial and entrepreneurial growth). A conceptual framework was developed based on business growth theory, whereby three econometric models were constructed and estimated to predict size variations. Data were collected through a survey on 200 SABs in North Zhejiang Province of China. Effects of the determinants were contrasted between different size indicators.

Findings

The SAB size can be affected by personal factors (employed working experience, education level, industry-specific know-how), interpersonal factor (relative ties to other SABs) and environmental factor (association support). The interpersonal and environmental factors tend to contribute to managerial growth, while the personal factors are usually conducive to entrepreneurial growth.

Research limitations/implications

This study addresses the questions of “why some SABs grow larger in size than others” and “why different SABs grow in different ways”. But more contexts and business types should be examined so as to ensure generalizability through future studies.

Practical implications

The research findings can provide guidelines for local tourism administration to encourage or regulate SAB development.

Originality/value

This study is among the first endeavors to examine the multidimensionality and determinants of business size in tourism and hospitality; it contributes to literature by expanding tourism entrepreneurship research into a/the “growth paradigm”.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Michaela Driver

This paper examines how groups respond to diversity. Specifically, a framework is developed that integrates prior research on diversity in groups within a learning…

5653

Abstract

This paper examines how groups respond to diversity. Specifically, a framework is developed that integrates prior research on diversity in groups within a learning perspective. The value of the framework is that it seeks to integrate various dimensions of group diversity with the intent of highlighting critical characteristics of groups that effectively manage diverse member contributions. Within this framework, the focus is on cognitive rather than demographic diversity and on how groups use diverse ideas and approaches to learn collectively. Based on this framework, it is suggested that groups manage cognitive diversity in three distinct ways, through accommodation, elaboration and transformation. These responses to diversity may represent different levels of group learning along a continuum ranging from routine, exploitative to non‐routine, exploratory learning. An exploratory study is presented in which this framework is used to understand how groups manage cognitive diversity. Preliminary study results suggest that most groups seem to respond to diversity by accommodating or elaborating while very few groups seem to engage in transformation. Specifically, few groups seem to invest the necessary resources to capitalize on diversity and create opportunities for non‐routine learning. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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