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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Yuanzhu Zhan, Kim Hua Tan and Robert K. Perrons

In today’s rapidly changing business environment, the case for accelerated innovation processes has become increasingly compelling at both a theoretical and practical…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s rapidly changing business environment, the case for accelerated innovation processes has become increasingly compelling at both a theoretical and practical level. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework for accelerated innovation in a data-driven market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on a two-step approach. First, a set of propositions concerning the best approaches to accelerated innovation are put forward. Then it offers qualitative evidence from five case studies involving world-leading firms, and explains how innovation can be accelerated in different kinds of data-driven environments.

Findings

The key sets of factors for accelerated innovation are: collateral structure; customer involvement; and ecosystem of innovation. The proposed framework enables firms to find ways to innovate – specifically, to make product innovation faster and less costly.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this research focus on high-tech industries in China. Using several specific innovation projects to represent accelerated innovation could raise the problem of the reliability and validity of the research findings. Additional research will probably be required to adapt the proposed framework to accommodate the cultural nuances of other countries and business environments.

Practical implications

The study is intended as a framework for managers to apply their resources to conduct product innovation in a fast and effective way. It developed six propositions about how, specifically, data analytics and ICTs can contribute to accelerated innovation.

Originality/value

The research shows that firms could harvest external knowledge and import ideas across organisational boundaries. An accelerated innovation framework is characterised by a multidimensional process involving intelligence efforts, relentless data collection and flexible working relationships with team members.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Yuanzhu Zhan, Kim Hua Tan, Guojun Ji, Leanne Chung and Minglang Tseng

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how firms could use big data to facilitate product innovation processes, by shortening the time to market, improving customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how firms could use big data to facilitate product innovation processes, by shortening the time to market, improving customers’ product adoption and reducing costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a two-step approach. First, this research identifies four potential key success factors for organisations to integrate big data in accelerating their product innovation processes. The proposed factors are further examined and developed by conducting interviews with different organisation experts and academic researchers. Then a framework is developed based on the interview outputs. The framework sets out the key success factors involved in leveraging big data to reduce lead times and costs in product innovation processes.

Findings

The three determined key success factors are: accelerated innovation process; customer connection; and an ecosystem of innovation. The authors believe that the developed framework based on big data represents a paradigm shift. It can help firms to make new product development dramatically faster and less costly.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed accelerated innovation processes demand a shift in traditional organisational culture and practices. It is, though, meaningful only for products and services with short life cycles. Moreover, the framework has not yet been widely tested.

Practical implications

This paper points to the vital role of big data in helping firms to accelerate product innovation processes. First of all, it allows organisations to launch new products to market as quickly as possible. Second, it helps organisations to determine the weaknesses of the product earlier in the development cycle. Third, it allows functionalities to be added to a product that customers are willing to pay a premium for, while eliminating features they do not want. Last, but not least, it identifies and then prioritises customer needs for specific markets.

Originality/value

The research shows that firms could harvest external knowledge and import ideas across organisational boundaries. An accelerated innovation process based on big data is characterised by a multidimensional process involving intelligence efforts, relentless data collection and flexible working relationships with team members.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Johnson Adafin, Suzanne Wilkinson, James O. B. Rotimi, Casimir MacGregor, John Tookey and Regan Potangaroa

This study aims to examine how innovation can be accelerated within the New Zealand (NZ) building industry to improve the productivity and efficiency of the industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how innovation can be accelerated within the New Zealand (NZ) building industry to improve the productivity and efficiency of the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a mixed philosophical approach combining interpretivism and post-positivism. Data for the study were obtained through a focus group of 50 practitioners that were selected using a stratified sampling procedure. All focus group data were audio-recorded, notes of the discussions were taken and then transcribed, de-identified and managed using NVivo software. Data analysis was undertaken using thematic analysis and inductive reasoning consistent with interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The study findings revealed that the industry could benefit from the adoption of new and emerging technologies to improve its performance, especially its productivity and efficiency. Key drivers for the adoption of innovative practices included the adaptation of “local best practices” from case studies that would consist of stories of successful innovations that could foster confidence in future innovation. It was also identified that Government and industry should nurture innovation through collaborative contracts, policies and regulations. Further, it was highlighted that a culture of innovation needed to be developed to help nurture competencies and capability within the industry workforce.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an in-depth examination of the need for innovation from the point of view of building industry practitioners. This study provides a useful starting-off point for further research and for the creation of policies that could help to support and accelerate innovation within the NZ building industry.

Practical implications

NZ’s building industry productivity and efficiency have been sub-optimal relative to other industries. But using evidence from the experiences and knowledge of industry practitioners, strategies can be developed to accelerate innovation within the NZ building industry that could help reverse industry performance. Further, the research findings can help inform government policies to develop support mechanisms that could encourage innovation in the industry in NZ. In addition, it is anticipated that the findings will provide a useful set of guidance for other countries that have similar market and physical constraints as those encountered by NZ.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of empirical studies on innovation in the NZ building industry which the current study contributes to. By sharing industry practitioners’ experiences and knowledge of innovation, the paper seeks to counteract more technocratic and technological optimist accounts of innovation within the building industry. Further, the paper provides insights into how the NZ building industry can transform its performance through innovation.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Kevin Celuch, Bryan Bourdeau, Mohammed Khayum and Leslie Townsend

The purpose of this paper is to present an adaptation of a program that is at the intersection of two dynamic force fields. The first relates to imperatives impinging upon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an adaptation of a program that is at the intersection of two dynamic force fields. The first relates to imperatives impinging upon and inherent in higher education. The second ties to the concept of ecosystems as spaces for aligning actors and resources to create value.

Design/methodology/approach

Tables I-III present pre-test and post-test means and p-values for the paired sample t-tests for the measures.

Findings

As expected, post-test means are consistently significantly higher (or lower depending on item wording) for a shift in beliefs away from self-censoring and prejudging ideas during ideation and more toward greater openness in the ideation process.

Originality/value

The paper examines the outcome of an educational program.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

H. Alan Raymond

Business firms are subject to accelerating technological change and related changes in the strategic value framework. Mistakes due to the misperception and…

Abstract

Purpose

Business firms are subject to accelerating technological change and related changes in the strategic value framework. Mistakes due to the misperception and misunderstanding of technology impacts have been very costly. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, describe and model the process of technological evolution as a dynamic value framework for strategy and related decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The research centered on the evolution of technology‐value vectors and their economic and strategic impacts. Information was collected from various known academic and professional publications. The paper also benefited from feedback gained from the presentation of an earlier version at ISMOT, 2007, Hangchow, China.

Findings

The paper indicates firms often have difficulty transitioning from one phase of a technology‐value vector to another, especially when presented with a super radical innovation, possibly because of strategy and related decision making. The adaptability of firms, from phase to phase, may be improved by a clearer perception and understanding of the relevant technology‐value vectors or vector.

Research limitations/implications

As the technology‐value vector model is new and offers many new perspectives it will be subject to further research, refinement and validation. It is best used to assess and explore medium to high technology. It does not explore specific market aspects such as preferences, place and time which are left to future research.

Practical implications

The model develops a tool and concepts for a clearer view and understanding of the economic/market forces impacting medium to high‐technological evolution. It is expected that this will lead to improved related strategy and decision making in medium to high technology firms.

Originality/value

The paper develops and describes a model of the evolution of the technology‐value vector, which may act as a dynamic framework for strategy in medium to high‐technology industries. The research may have many other uses, including the management and planning of technology.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Wenjing Li, Tahseen Ahmed Bhutto, Ali Reza Nasiri, Hamid Ali Shaikh and Fayaz Ali Samo

The purpose of this paper is to approach the issue of how organizational innovation can be accelerated with the support of leadership structures and the organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to approach the issue of how organizational innovation can be accelerated with the support of leadership structures and the organizational climate, specifically taking into account the top innovative universities of the world, which has not been found in previous empirical studies.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey, based on a deductive approach, is adopted since the questionnaire for organizational innovation is designed for organizations in order to measure organizational innovation, widely used by experienced employees from senior managers to all kind of employees (Caird et al., 2013) facilitating the European Commission work, whereas for transformational leadership, a Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Bass and Avolio, 1994) is utilized. A complete online questionnaire was developed for collecting data, and the PLS-SEM statistical technique is used for analysis and results.

Findings

Top innovative universities of the world mostly have a transformational leadership style directly triggering organizational innovation which is consistent with the previous studies, while transactional leadership is having a positive relationship with organizational culture and innovation, but the results were statistically insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

Based on this research and other previous studies, it is suggested that universities across the world ought to imply transformational leadership traits and style which have fostered organizational innovation in the top-ranked innovative universities in developed nations, whereas more factors needed to be studied so that comprehensive guidelines should be provided to universities and research institutes where innovation is stagnant and passive.

Practical implications

The finding has practical implications, suggesting that universities and research institutes should draft and implement guidelines where leaders with certain traits and norms can play a role to nourish an environment where stakeholders think outside the box, with learning and knowledge creation, and proactive contribution beyond responsibilities, obligations, and compulsion.

Social implications

This study has suggested that less innovative universities should draft and design leadership and cultural enriching plans so that society, organizations, and commercial firms could foster innovation, ultimately benefiting general public and society.

Originality/value

Very few of the scholars have investigated from the perspective of innovative universities, where knowledge is created and flows into organizations, either governmental or private, and society in general. As a result, this study aims to investigate how leadership has impacted the culture of knowledge creation and innovativeness in the top 100 innovative universities. So, this is among rare studies where universities are suggested to adopt innovation supporting culture and leadership.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Peter Williamson and Feng Wan

The purpose of this paper is to re-assess the concept of ownership advantages in the light of successful international expansion of multinationals from emerging economies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-assess the concept of ownership advantages in the light of successful international expansion of multinationals from emerging economies (EMNEs) and explore how these advantages are built.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a viewpoint based on analysis of the successful international expansion of a sample of Chinese EMNEs where success is measured their ability win share in overseas markets. This allows us to identify their ownership advantages, the antecedents of these advantages and how they were built using dynamic capabilities.

Findings

EMNEs have “non-traditional” ownership advantages that have been built by finding innovative ways to leverage the locational advantages of their home countries. The conversion of locational advantages into ownership advantages requires that firms build dynamic capabilities that enable them to innovate in the use of the locational advantages they enjoy.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a small sample of EMNEs from China who have succeeded in winning market share in the initial phases of their international expansion. In the light of these limitations, the authors discuss the question the sustainability of their competitive advantage as well as the likely applicability of our findings to EMNEs from other EMNEs.

Originality/value

The authors revisit the paradox that despite the growth and success of multinationals from EMNEs in the past decade they are assumed to lack ownership advantages. The authors show that EMNEs’ ownership advantages differ from the traditional advantages such proprietary technologies and brand equity that are enjoyed by incumbent multinationals.

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2012

Allam Ahmed and Amer Al-Roubaie

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of innovation and technological learning in building a knowledge-based economy in the Muslim world. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of innovation and technological learning in building a knowledge-based economy in the Muslim world. Despite abundant financial and human capital, most Muslim countries still lack adequate scientific and technological infrastructure to absorb, apply and create knowledge and disseminate information.

Design/methodology/approach

Using various major international institutions’ databases (UN, World Bank, OCED, etc.), a holistic approach is used to analyse the critical role of science, technology and innovation to build a knowledge-based economy in Muslim countries.

Findings

This paper examines the main challenges facing Muslim countries to build a knowledge-based economy driven by innovation and technological learning. In doing so, a framework for building an effective innovation system that will achieve a knowledge-based economy in Muslim countries is presented, taking into account a variety of international, institutional and intellectual perspectives.

Originality/value

Given the scarcity of information and data about the subject area on Muslim countries, the study uses several sources of secondary data which are considered the most valid and reliable data available internationally about the subject.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Abdul Rauf, Ying Ma and Abdul Jalil

While previous studies find innovation to be an essential driver of export growth, the existing literature has neglected the role of different dimensions of technological…

Abstract

Purpose

While previous studies find innovation to be an essential driver of export growth, the existing literature has neglected the role of different dimensions of technological innovation in export performance, especially in emerging countries. In particular, much less attention has been provided to investigate how enhancing innovation activities in more technical industries influence the relationship between technological innovation and export. Purpose of this paper is to present a unified framework to empirically investigate the integrated impact of the various technological innovation dimensions on export performance of industrial enterprises in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a panel dataset of enterprise-level data classified into China’s two-digit capital- and technology-intensive manufacturing industries for the 1998–2016 period and applying system-GMM regressions to control for the problem of endogeneity, the authors empirically investigate the integrated impact of a variety of the dimensions of technological innovation on export.

Findings

The authors find that: (1) Domestic R&D efforts and technology spillovers from foreign investment are critical determinants for capital- and technology-intensive exports. (2) External technology may not automatically contribute to export success whereas the interaction of external technology with domestic skill and expertise is a necessary condition for global competitiveness. (3) There exists complementarity between domestic and foreign innovation efforts when they jointly determine export. (4) Chinese government’s trade and innovation policies have significantly contributed to its export growth. Also, the authors examine that the extent of the effect of innovation on export depends upon the type of industry and it is found to be greater in capital- and technology-intensive industries.

Originality/value

This paper fills the research gap in existing literature by distinguishing between different dimensions of technological innovation and integrating them into a unified framework to empirically investigate their impact on export performance of industrial enterprises in emerging countries. The study provides important insights for policymakers.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Kristina Heinonen and Tore Strandvik

The empirical study draws on a crowdsourced database of 221 innovations associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

The empirical study draws on a crowdsourced database of 221 innovations associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Aside from the health and humanitarian crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused an acute economic downturn in most sectors, forcing public and private organizations to rethink and reconfigure service provision. The paper introduces the concept of imposed service innovation as a new strategic lens to augment the extant view of service innovation as a primarily discretionary activity.

Findings

The identified imposed service innovations were assigned to 11 categories and examined in terms of their strategic horizon and strategic stretch. The innovations are characterized by spatial flexibility, social and health outreach and exploitation of technology.

Research limitations/implications

As a new area of service innovation research, imposed service innovations highlight strategic issues that include the primacy of customers and the fragility of institutions.

Practical implications

Situations involving imposed service innovation represent opportunities for rapid business development when recognized as such. A severe disruption such as a pandemic can catalyze managerial rethinking as organizations are forced to look beyond their existing business strategies.

Social implications

As a strategic response to severe disruption of institutions, markets and service offerings, imposed service innovations afford opportunities to implement transformation and enhance well-being. This novel strategic lens foregrounds a societal account of service innovation, emphasizing societal relevance and context beyond the challenges of business viability alone.

Originality/value

While extant service innovation research has commonly focused on discretionary activities that enable differentiation and growth, imposed service innovations represent actions for resilience and renewal.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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