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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Edem M. Azila-Gbettor, Christopher Mensah and Martin Kwasi Abiemo

The paper examined the mediating effect of meaningfulness of study on the relation between self-efficacy and academic programme satisfaction within higher education setup.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examined the mediating effect of meaningfulness of study on the relation between self-efficacy and academic programme satisfaction within higher education setup.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 376 randomly selected students took part in the study by completing a self-reported survey. Data were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

Results suggest self-efficacy and meaningfulness of studies positively predict student's satisfaction with academic programme. Besides, meaningfulness of study mediates the relation between self-efficacy and student's satisfaction of academic programme.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to provide empirical evidence of the influence of meaningfulness of studies on self-efficacy and student academic programme satisfaction in the higher education context.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Jacob Hibel, Daphne M. Penn and R. C. Morris

Social psychological perspectives on educational stratification offer explanations that bridge the macro and micro social worlds. However, while ethnoracial disparities in…

Abstract

Purpose

Social psychological perspectives on educational stratification offer explanations that bridge the macro and micro social worlds. However, while ethnoracial disparities in academic achievement are evident during the earliest grade levels, most social psychological research in this area has examined high school or college student samples and has used a black–white binary to operationalize race.

Design/methodology/approach

We use longitudinal structural equation models to examine links between academic self-efficacy beliefs and school performance among a national sample of diverse third- through eighth-grade students in the United States.

Findings

Contrary to hypotheses derived from the student identity literature, we find no evidence that elementary and middle school students from different ethnoracial backgrounds vary in the degree to which they selectively discount evaluative feedback in their academic self-efficacy construction, nor in the extent to which they demonstrate disrupted links between academic self-efficacy and subsequent academic performance.

Originality/value

The study examines the extent to which race-linked social psychological processes may be driving academic achievement inequalities during the primary schooling years.

Details

Education and Youth Today
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-046-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Edem M. Azila-Gbettor and Martin K. Abiemo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between academic self-efficacy, study engagement and perceived lecturer support within a higher education setup.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between academic self-efficacy, study engagement and perceived lecturer support within a higher education setup.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 376 respondents from a technical university in Ghana took part in the study by completing self-reported questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and partial least square-based structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

Findings suggest academic self-efficacy and perceived lecturer support are positive and significant predictors of study engagement. In addition, perceived lecturer support was a significant moderator between academic self-efficacy and study engagement.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to have tested a model including academic self-efficacy, study engagement and perceived lecturer support in a technical university setup from a developing country perspective.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Hillman Wirawan and Muhammad Thahir Bandu

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional…

8614

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional challenges which also potentially attenuate their academic performance. Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) is sufficient in explaining this phenomenon as well as suggesting self-efficacy enhancement strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a speculative viewpoint on the implications of SETIS. The author reviewed relevant literature and systematically constructing the SETIS based on the SCT. The SCT was used to design an appropriate training to help international students cope with transitional challenges which significantly attenuate their academic performance.

Findings

The SCT and self-efficacy theory were relevant in designing the training for international students. There are four key elements of the SETIS: goal-setting; effort explanation; modeling; and sharing and evaluation. The implementation of SETIS follows the common rule in conducting effective training including need assessment and post-training evaluation. Information from academic performance record, English as Second Language test score, General Self-efficacy Scale, Students’ Adaptation to College Questionnaire, and Focus Group Discussion is also necessary to justify the need for SETIS.

Research limitations/implications

Despite theoretical evidence of the SETIS, further research is necessary to test the effectiveness of this training. Future study in this specific area should focus on examining the effectiveness of the training.

Originality/value

This paper addressed important issues in international education. A systematic effort in providing robust and theoretical-based training for international students is necessary. By considering the importance of self-efficacy and academic performance, this paper had begun an initial effort in designing training for international students who are struggling for a transitional challenge. Additionally, this paper provides a practical guideline in implementing SETIS.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Panagiotis Gkorezis, Petros Kostagiolas and Dimitris Niakas

Substantial empirical research has addressed the antecedents of students’ academic performance. Building on these insights, the purpose of this paper is to extend the…

Abstract

Purpose

Substantial empirical research has addressed the antecedents of students’ academic performance. Building on these insights, the purpose of this paper is to extend the related literature by investigating the impact of students’ exploration on their academic performance. Furthermore, to provide a better understanding of this relationship the authors incorporate two sequential mediators, namely, information seeking and academic self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative approach using self-report questionnaires. This study was conducted in the Hellenic Open University through a specially designed questionnaire. The authors collected data from 248 students attending a postgraduate course in Healthcare Management.

Findings

The results showed that information seeking and in turn academic self-efficacy mediate the positive association between exploration and academic performance. Both theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.

Originality/value

Students’ exploration plays an important role in enhancing both their information seeking and self-efficacy which in turn affects their academic performance.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Ida Fatimawati Adi Badiozaman, Hugh John Leong and Olivia Jikus

The purpose of this paper is to explore students’ perception and use of English in higher education (HE) institutions in Malaysia. In doing so, it aims to better…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore students’ perception and use of English in higher education (HE) institutions in Malaysia. In doing so, it aims to better understand the relationship between students’ perception of English and academic self-efficacy, particularly since English is used as a medium of instruction in HE institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Approximately, 980 questionnaires were distributed to four HE institutions to explore relationships and patterns of students perceived English language proficiency and academic self-efficacy as potential variables shaping their academic performance. About 838 students participated.

Findings

The findings revealed that although students did not rate their English proficiency very highly, they placed high value on English in regards to their academic performance and job prospects upon graduation. More importantly, the findings also show that the majority of the students had high academic self-efficacy beliefs in L2, and were more accurate at calibrating their efficacy beliefs with subsequent performance in academic settings, unlike typical research findings on Asian students as generally holding lower self-efficacy beliefs. This finding was evidenced by the strong and positive relationship between perceived English language competence and academic self-efficacy in L2.

Practical implications

It is imperative that students’ academic self-efficacy beliefs be enhanced as it has been revealed to mobilise motivation and cognitive resources. It is also necessary to offer targeted support services specifically designed to further help students to improve their English academic skills.

Originality/value

In this study, rewards offered by instrumental motivation in terms of increased academic literacy and career appear to supersede the motive of identification with the L2 language community. It is likely that students in Malaysian HE institutions are becoming increasingly motivated to study due to their own visions and desires, rather than as a result of external requirements. Such findings should be capitalised since self-efficacy is predictive of academic performance.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Hayward Andres

The purpose of this study is to investigate a theoretical framework that examines and extends understanding of the role of cognitive/information processing, learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate a theoretical framework that examines and extends understanding of the role of cognitive/information processing, learning motivation and learning task behaviors in facilitating student engagement, course persistence and academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Student subjects were used to collect survey data. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the impact of active teaching, academic self-efficacy and task avoidance on the dependent variables – course grade, course persistence and expectancy for success.

Findings

Active teaching and academic self-efficacy were positive predictors of course grade while task avoidance was a negative predictor of course grade. Course persistence was positively impacted by academic self-efficacy and diminished by task-avoidance behaviors. Academic self-efficacy was shown to positively impact expectancy for success.

Practical implications

The results confirm the importance of adopting active teaching techniques, the need for periodic opportunities for experienced academic success and the need for coaching on self-regulation of study habits and class attendance behaviors.

Originality/value

This study builds on prior calls for more investigations on the role of teaching style on student psychological responses, engagement, learning task behaviors and academic performance. The teaching and learning processes were examined on four levels – attention/engagement, encoding, processing/synthesizing and learning task behaviors. In addition, prior work was extended by incorporating behavioral indicators (e.g. task avoidance) of learning motivation as opposed to reliance on self-reported levels of motivation that may have not been consistent with actual behaviors.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Andrea Slobodnikova and Brandon Randolph-Seng

One of the goals of various European Union (EU) organizations (i.e. Roma and non-Roma nonprofits) is the integration of Roma into the educational system. A challenge for…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the goals of various European Union (EU) organizations (i.e. Roma and non-Roma nonprofits) is the integration of Roma into the educational system. A challenge for the educational systems of EU countries, therefore, is to determine how to support the academic performance of Roma. Understanding the positive and negative factors related to Roma’s academic performance and achievement is an important first step in increasing academic success among this minority group.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative experimental design was used both online and face-to-face to examine whether stereotype threat had an influence on the academic performance of Roma in Slovakia and second, whether such threat was moderated by social identification and academic self-efficacy.

Findings

The results showed that stereotype threat does influence Roma in Slovakia and there were direct effects of social identity and academic self-efficacy on academic performance of the face-to-face participants.

Originality/value

Consistent with stereotype threat theory, to the best of authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to show that a stereotype threat did harm the academic performance of the face-to-face Roma sampled. Further, although many studies have examined stereotype threat effects on academic performance, little is known regarding whether social identification and academic self-efficacy have an influence on such threats. The results of the study show that social identification and academic self-efficacy had a significant direct influence on academic performance.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Jingsong Zhao, John McCormick and Katherine Hoekman

This article aims to explore how self‐efficacy is related to academic research activities and how intra‐culturally relevant factors may play a role in self‐efficacy in the…

953

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore how self‐efficacy is related to academic research activities and how intra‐culturally relevant factors may play a role in self‐efficacy in the context of higher education in Beijing. In particular, relationships of self‐efficacy for research with research productivity and idiocentrism‐allocentrism are to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to academics in ten randomly selected universities in Beijing and generated 296 valid questionnaires. Data were analysed using factor analysis and multiple regression.

Findings

Gender and discipline are identified as predictors of self‐efficacy. Specifically, female academics reported lower levels of self‐efficacy for research than males. Academics in the social sciences reported lower levels of self‐efficacy for research than those in the natural sciences. Moreover, relationships are also found between self‐efficacy for research and idiocentrism‐allocentrism.

Originality/value

The study makes an extensive investigation of self‐efficacy theory, originally developed in Western contexts, in an Eastern culture and provides evidence that intra‐cultural and demographic factors play substantial roles in research self‐efficacy.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Robert M. Klassen and Ellen L. Usher

For half a century, psychologist Albert Bandura has worked to advance a cognitive interactional model of human functioning that emphasizes the role of cognitive and…

Abstract

For half a century, psychologist Albert Bandura has worked to advance a cognitive interactional model of human functioning that emphasizes the role of cognitive and symbolic representations as central processes in human adaptation and change. In his seminal 1977 publication, Bandura emphasized that these representations – visualized actions and outcomes stemming from reflective thought – form the basis from which individuals assess their personal efficacy. An efficacy belief, he contended, is the “conviction that one can successfully execute the behavior required to produce the outcomes” one desires (p. 193). Efficacy beliefs serve as the primary means by which people are able to exercise a measure of control over their lives. During the next two decades, Bandura (1986, 1997) advanced his social cognitive theory, in which people are viewed as self-organizing, proactive, self-reflecting, and self-regulating rather than as solely reactive organisms, products of environmental or concealed inner influences. From this agentic perspective, people are seen as contributors to their life circumstances, not just recipients of them. In this way, people are “partial architects of their own destinies” (Bandura, 1997, p. 8).

Details

The Decade Ahead: Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-111-5

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