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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Qiaolei Jiang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships between internet connectedness, online gaming, internet addiction symptoms, and academic performance

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships between internet connectedness, online gaming, internet addiction symptoms, and academic performance decrement among the internet-dependent young people in China.

Design/methodology/approach

A paper-based survey was conducted among the young clients in one of the earliest and largest internet addiction clinics in China. A total of 594 in-patients (mean age=17.76 y) voluntarily participated in this study.

Findings

By adopting the concept of internet connectedness, this study explored the internet use patterns among the young internet addicts, for example, internet café patrons and those who use internet with more goals or higher degree of internet adhesiveness had more internet addiction symptoms. Online gaming was found to play a significant role in the development of internet addiction. As expected, the level of internet addiction is significantly linked to academic performance decrement. Consistent with previous studies, males showed higher degree of internet connectedness and online game usage than females. Noticeably, the moderation effect of online game playing and the mediating effect of internet addiction were also tested.

Research limitations/implications

This research is focussed on the internet-dependent group, thus the generalizability of the results need to be interpreted with caution.

Practical implications

This study provides insight for parents, educators, health professionals, and policy makers regarding treatment and intervention for internet addiction among young people in China.

Originality/value

Since very little research has been done focussing on diagnosed internet-dependent group, this paper scores as a pioneering study of its kind in China.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Aqdas Malik, Amandeep Dhir, Puneet Kaur and Aditya Johri

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue, the stressor-strain-outcome (SSO) framework is applied. The study consists of two cross-sectional surveys that were organized with young-adult students. Study A was conducted with 1,398 WhatsApp users (aged 19 to 27 years), while Study B was organized with 472 WhatsApp users (aged 18 to 23 years).

Findings

Intensity of social media use was the strongest predictor of social media fatigue. Online social comparison and self-disclosure were also significant predictors of social media fatigue. The findings also suggest that social media fatigue further contributes to a decrease in academic performance.

Originality/value

This study builds upon the limited yet growing body of literature on a theme highly relevant for scholars, practitioners as well as social media users. The current study focuses on examining different causes of social media fatigue induced through the use of a highly popular mobile instant messaging app, WhatsApp. The SSO framework is applied to explore and establish empirical links between stressors and social media fatigue.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Sven Laumer and Christian Maier

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to…

Abstract

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to their users, including fun, information from significant others, and a distraction from real-life problems. In parallel, the authors see that there are also negative consequences, such as stress when using SNS. In 2012, research started to talk about SNS-use stress as a specific form of technostress. Since that early study, 62 articles have been published in peer-reviewed outlets that explain why SNS-users perceive stress. Our literature review uses the transactional model of stress to integrate these articles to propose a transactional model of SNS-use stress. The model indicates social and technical SNS-stressors that trigger psychological, physiological, and behavioural reactions, named SNS-strains. Our findings suggest there are more social SNS-stressors than technical ones. In terms of SNS-strain, research has mainly focussed on psychological, e.g. exhaustion or dissatisfaction, and behavioural, e.g. discontinuous usage intention or distraction, SNS-strains. Based on those results, the authors identify research gaps and provide implications for research, SNS-users, SNS-providers, organisations, and parents. With that, the authors aim to provide a conceptual summary of the past and, simultaneously, a starting point for further research.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Karim Al-Yafi, Mazen El-Masri and Ray Tsai

Social network sites (SNSs) have been common applications attracting a large number of users in Qatar. Current literature remains inconclusive about the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Social network sites (SNSs) have been common applications attracting a large number of users in Qatar. Current literature remains inconclusive about the relationship between SNS usage and users’ academic performance. While one stream confirms that SNS usage may lead to addiction and seriously affect individuals’ academic performance, other studies refer to SNS as learning enablers. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it investigates the SNS usage profiles among the young generation in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) represented by Qatar; second, it examines the relationship between the identified SNS usage profiles and their respective users’ academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a quantitative survey-based method that was adapted from Chen’s internet Addiction Scale to fit the context of social networks. Data were collected from students of two universities in Qatar, one private and another public. Respondents’ grade point average was also collected and compared across the different usage profiles to understand how SNS usage behavior affects academic performance.

Findings

Results reveal that there is no linear relationship between SNS usage and academic performance. Therefore, this study further investigates SNS usage profiles and identifies three groups: passive (low usage), engaged (normal usage) and addicted (high usage). It was found that engaged users demonstrate significantly higher academic performance than their passive and addicted peers. Moreover, there is no significant difference in the academic performance between passive and addicted users.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional and based on self-reported data collected from university students in Qatar. Further research venues could employ a more general sample covering a longer period, differentiating between messaging tools (e.g. WhatsApp) and other pure SNS (e.g. Twitter), and to cover other aspects than just academic performance.

Originality/value

This study complements research efforts on the influence of technology on individuals and on the society in the GCC area. It concludes that engaged SNS users achieve better academic performance than the addicted or passive users. Contradicting the strong linear relationship between SNS and performance, as claimed by previous studies, is the main originality of this paper.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2019

Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku, George Kofi Amoako and Desmond K. Kumi

This study aims to determine the impact of social media usage on university student’s academic performance in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the impact of social media usage on university student’s academic performance in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was used for the study. With the aid of a simple random sampling technique, quantitative data were obtained from 373 out of 400 respondents representing 93 per cent of volunteered participants. Data collected was analysed using structural equation modelling to establish the relationship among social media information, social media entertainment, social media innovation, social media knowledge generation and student performance.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that social media information, social media innovation and social media entertainment all had a significant positive influence on social media knowledge generation, which has wide learning and knowledge management implications. Also, the study indicated that information computer technology knowledge moderates the relationship between social media and student performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample taken was mainly cross-sectional in nature rendering the inference of causal relationships between the variables impossible. Future researchers should adopt a longitudinal research design to examine causality. Finally, the study was limited to only university students in Accra, Ghana. Future research can extend to a bigger student population and to other West African and African countries.

Practical implications

This paper will serve as a profitable source of information for managers and researchers who may embark on future research on social media and academic performance. The findings that social media information, innovation and entertainment can likewise enhance social media knowledge generation can help managers and university teachers to use the vehicle of innovation and entertainment to communicate knowledge.

Social implications

The findings of this study will help policymakers in education and other industries that engage the youth to realise the important factors that can make them get the best in the social media space.

Originality/value

Social media usage in academic performance is increasingly prevalent. However, little is known about how social media knowledge generation mediates between social media usage and academic performance and, furthermore, whether the information computer technology knowledge level of students moderates the relationship between social media knowledge generation and academic performance of university students in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly Ghana. Theoretically, the findings of this study provide clear research evidence to guide various investigations that can be done on the relationships of the variables under social media usage, knowledge generation and university student performance, which advances the diffusion of new knowledge.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Wen-Pin Tien and Colin C.J. Cheng

Building on the socio-cultural theory and the climate literature, the purpose of this paper is to examine: how to effectively manage computer-mediated platforms to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the socio-cultural theory and the climate literature, the purpose of this paper is to examine: how to effectively manage computer-mediated platforms to improve innovation performance, and which types of computer-mediated platforms firms should be more involved with.

Design/methodology/approach

The multivariate mediated regression method and relative effect analysis were employed to test the model.

Findings

Analyses reveal that online creative climate mediates the effects of the perceived innovation policy on both novelty and meaningfulness of creative behaviors. In addition, online creative climate is positively related to both radical and incremental innovation performance. Further, the relative performance results of the four types of computer-mediated platforms are found to be unequal.

Practical implications

The results suggest to managers that establishing creative climates in computer-mediated platforms is a promising approach to improve firms’ innovation performance. The results further indicate that managers should acknowledge the advantages and limitations of each type of computer-mediated platform in order to increase innovation performance. Otherwise, firms may misallocate resources and investment efforts in computer-mediated platforms.

Originality/value

By categorizing computer-mediated platforms into four types, this study provides the first synthesis of personal interactions that occur in computer-mediated environments. This study presents the first empirical assessment of how creative climate can be used as a facilitator for improving innovation performance and which type of computer-mediated platforms is more appropriate for radical or incremental innovations.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Sutharson Kanapathippillai, Ahamed Shamlee Hasheem and Steven Dellaportas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between the use of a computerised learning tool (specifically designed to teach consolidation accounting) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between the use of a computerised learning tool (specifically designed to teach consolidation accounting) and student performance in the final examination of an undergraduate accounting unit on Corporate Accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

A regression model was developed to analyse 1,103 observations of assignment and examination scores, collected over three semesters, to test the central proposition that computer assisted learning enhances student learning outcomes and performance in the exam.

Findings

The results show a positive and significant relationship between the computerised accounting assignment on consolidated accounting (linked to usage of the computerised tool) and the consolidation question in the final examination. The findings suggest that the computerised consolidation accounting package (CCAP) assists students to understand the concepts underpinning consolidation accounting.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from a single institution, which may not represent the population of accounting students. Due to ethical obligations, the study lacked a control group that would have allowed meaningful comparison and assessment of student performance. Furthermore, whilst the findings in this study were able to demonstrate a positive association between the CCAP and exam performance, it is unable to determine the quality and depth of the learning experience from using the CCAP.

Practical implications

The present study found that a CCAP and its usage has the potential to positively impact student performance on assessment tasks on subject matter similar to concepts contained the computer package. Such findings may encourage instructors to seek ways of incorporating learning technologies in the pedagogical design.

Originality/value

This is believed to be one the few papers that has exclusively studied the impact of a specific CCAP and a specific segment in accounting education (consolidation accounting) using direct measures, CCAP assignment score and the final examination score for a question dedicated to consolidation accounting.

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

James Castiglione

Within the context of general systems theory (GST), this paper aims to review the literature on the potential for internet abuse and addiction among undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the context of general systems theory (GST), this paper aims to review the literature on the potential for internet abuse and addiction among undergraduate university students in the university and library environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review and synthesis of the relevant literature derived from the computer, education, medical and psychological sciences.

Findings

Anecdotal evidence has been accumulating for over a decade, suggesting that inappropriate use of the internet by college students may lead to adverse educational outcomes; however, very little empirical evidence is available to substantiate the phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

A lack of empirical evidence limits the conclusions one may draw on the nature and extent of the internet‐related difficulties that students may be experiencing. However, the accumulating anecdotal evidence and commentary suggests that near‐term and long‐term problems for both the individual and society are indeed possible. Therefore, a robust, international research program, designed to generate the empirical evidence required to clarify this issue, is absolutely essential.

Originality/value

A timely review of the internet abuse/addiction phenomenon is presented with the objective of increasing awareness, debate and additional empirical research.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Puneet Kaur, Amandeep Dhir, Amal Khalifa Alkhalifa and Anushree Tandon

This study is a systematic literature review (SLR) on prior research examining the impact of the nocturnal use of social media platforms on a user's sleep, its dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is a systematic literature review (SLR) on prior research examining the impact of the nocturnal use of social media platforms on a user's sleep, its dimensions and its perceptually allied problems. This SLR aims to curate, assimilate and critically examine the empirical research in this domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty-five relevant studies identified from the Scopus and Web of Science (WoS) databases were analyzed to develop a comprehensive research profile, identify gaps in the current knowledge and delineate emergent research topics.

Findings

Prior research has narrowly focused on investigating the associations between specific aspects of social media use behavior and sleep dimensions. The findings suggest that previous studies are limited by research design and sampling issues. We highlight the imperative need to expand current research boundaries through a comprehensive framework that elucidates potential issues to be addressed in future research.

Originality/value

The findings have significant implications for clinicians, family members and educators concerning promoting appropriate social media use, especially during sleep latency.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Leena Korpinen and Rauno Pääkkönen

The aim was to study how the working-age population's mental symptoms had a relation to the using of the Internet. In addition, the aim was to analyze how the mental…

Abstract

The aim was to study how the working-age population's mental symptoms had a relation to the using of the Internet. In addition, the aim was to analyze how the mental symptoms had a relation to background information. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting a questionnaire to 15,000 working-age (18-65) Finns. Mental symptoms of responses (6121) were analysed using the model factors age, gender and use of the Internet. Only 0.06% mentioned that they were somehow addicted to the Internet. Based on statistical analyses, age and marital status had an influence on many mental symptoms. The use of the Internet at leisure had an influence on substance addiction and fear situations. The importance of the Internet only had an influence on the fear situations. In the future it will be essential to take into account that the use of the internet can affect mental symptoms.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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