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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Jenny Lynne Semenza, Regina Koury and Sandra Shropshire

This paper aims to provide an annotated bibliography of literature on diversity initiatives for 2010-2015 in academic libraries, both in USA and internationally. It aims…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an annotated bibliography of literature on diversity initiatives for 2010-2015 in academic libraries, both in USA and internationally. It aims to help librarians interested in fostering a welcoming and supporting environment for all individuals and engaging library community in discussions about diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted literature review using EBSCOhost multidisciplinary databases and Google Scholar, using the terms “divers*” and “academic librar*” and limiting search results to 2010-2015 dates.

Findings

The literature reviewed in this annotated bibliography is a solid start to assist librarians with diversity initiatives from planning collections to wider organization planning purposes.

Originality/value

No other annotated bibliography currently exists for those interested in conducting vital work of ensuring a respectful and inclusive library environment.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Matthew P. Ciszek and Courtney L. Young

This paper aims to examine the methods of diversity‐related collection assessment useful for large academic libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the methods of diversity‐related collection assessment useful for large academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Several examples of diversity‐related collection assessment (circulation and use statistics, WorldCat Collection Analysis, comparison to standard bibliographies, focus groups, patron interviews and surveys, stewardship letters, and a diversity collection development statement) are explored.

Findings

Libraries wishing to assess a collection for diversity should have a clear definition of diversity in place before assessment. Many collection assessment methods useful for determining the diversity of a collection are not applicable for large libraries. Additional tools may need to be developed to facilitate this type of assessment in the future, especially at large libraries.

Originality/value

The paper encourages librarians at larger academic libraries to rethink how the collections are assessed for diversity needs, and illustrates methods useful in performing this assessment in larger institutions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Ken Coopwood and Shirlene Smith Augustine

The Diversity Fellows Program (DFP) was an initiative created within a Division for Diversity (DD) in response to imperatives for campus diversity leadership. In the…

Abstract

The Diversity Fellows Program (DFP) was an initiative created within a Division for Diversity (DD) in response to imperatives for campus diversity leadership. In the author’s reflection/perceptions, it brought forward a new paradigm for, Bistro University (BU) (pseudonym), as well as expansions in university–community and statewide relations. The DFP employed a multifaceted approach to climate transformation and was a joint development with the highest level of administration and utilized full, tenured, underrepresented, and women faculty to lead initiatives that engaged faculty in research relationships with students, STEM communities, mentoring, and unit accountability for hiring and retention. The result was the creation of several best-practice initiatives, which showcased unsung and/or underutilized student and faculty research as catalysts for recruitment, retention, and promotion, and improved unit accountability for diversification and campus/community relations. The authors assert that the DFP ultimately represented a multipoint approach to climate transformation rooted in relationship building, measurable accountability, and partnership development. This chapter will expound on the creation and impact the DFP had on BU’s diversity agenda and the DD mission. It will also illuminate the author’s perspectives of successes as well as struggles to be expected while setting standards for excellence in academic diversity innovation. Finally, this chapter challenges senior administrators and academics to increase support and reward innovation associated with cultural competence training, multicultural engagement, and best practices for diversity administration.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Íris Barbosa and Carlos Cabral‐Cardoso

The purpose of this paper is to look at the way higher‐education institutions are responding to the challenges of an increasingly diverse academic force and the extent to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the way higher‐education institutions are responding to the challenges of an increasingly diverse academic force and the extent to which organizational culture welcomes and values diversity, thus allowing the university to benefit from talented people with diverse backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in a Portuguese university. Data were collected from 45 interviews with faculty members from different backgrounds and affiliations.

Findings

The organization studied is failing to promote equal opportunities policies and to manage the increasingly diverse academic workforce. Behavioural pressures to conform and parochial and inward looking attitudes appear to prevail. Values‐in‐use and artefacts seem to reflect the assimilation ideals. National origin came out as the key diversity issue. The integration of foreign academics is left to the individuals concerned and little effort is made to accommodate and to take advantage of their unique contribution.

Originality/value

The paper provides an in‐depth account of subtle discriminatory mechanisms faced by non‐native academics in a university that does not value diversity.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Irina Gewinner

This paper aims to represent a unique and original piece of research on full professors in global hospitality and tourism academia. Aimed at revisiting academic

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to represent a unique and original piece of research on full professors in global hospitality and tourism academia. Aimed at revisiting academic leadership, this study identifies its components and gains insight into the so far understudied dimensions of diversity in academic contexts worldwide.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the careers of senior researchers (R3 and R4, according to European Commission) in hospitality and tourism, with special attention given to diversity. Based on quantitative methodology and a standardised online search, it uses individual-level data to give insights into dimensions of academic leadership. Full professors from the UK, the USA, German-speaking countries (Germany, Austria and Switzerland) and the Asia-Pacific region (Australia, New Zealand, China, Malaysia, Singapore and South Korea) build the sample.

Findings

Academic leadership in hospitality and tourism academia is not yet fully tied to cooperation with industry, as predicted by the “Triple Helix” model. Currently, the majority of the intellectual component constitutes academic leadership, outweighing administrative and innovative angles. Gender, age and ethnic diversity are underrepresented. While some regions can be considered sealed to ethnic diversity, others are more open and attract international scholars.

Originality/value

Rooted in interdisciplinary explanations, this study is the first of its kind to consider various diversity dimensions of academic leadership from a global perspective. It not only enriches the notion of academic leadership but also provides several practical implications and suggestions for further research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2014

J. Burns, K. J. Euske and Mary A. Malina

This paper chronicles the evolution of the academic debate regarding diversity in management accounting research and discusses its impact on the current state of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper chronicles the evolution of the academic debate regarding diversity in management accounting research and discusses its impact on the current state of management accounting research.

Methodology/approach

We review the stream of literature over the last 40-plus years that discusses diversity in management accounting.

Findings

Anthony’s 1972 paper in Sloan Management Review makes a call to academics to adjust the trajectory of management accounting research. Our review of the literature reveals that early responses in the 1980s and 1990s to Anthony’s call primarily came from U.S. academics who suggest a broader theoretical approach and more work in the field. After 2000, non-U.S. authors and non-U.S. journals take up the call for diversity and shift the discussion to the more fundamental topic of validating and accepting various research paradigms. The U.S. academic environment fosters a narrow yet important view of management account research. To balance the U.S. view, non-U.S. academics have the liberty of using diverse theories, paradigms, and methods.

Originality/value

The results of the study indicate that the challenge to moving management accounting research forward is for diverse research approaches to be valued and published in top accounting journals that tend to be U.S. based.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-166-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Sally Riad and Deborah Jones

The authors use the debates instigated by Bernal's Black Athena to rethink the concepts of “race”, “culture” and “diversity” in organization and aim to examine their…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors use the debates instigated by Bernal's Black Athena to rethink the concepts of “race”, “culture” and “diversity” in organization and aim to examine their intersection with academic authority.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the works of Derrida and Hegel, the authors question the pursuit of origins and illustrate its role in essentializing race, culture and diversity. The paper examines these through binaries including white/black, nature/culture, purity/diversity and diversity/university.

Findings

First, both the Black Athena debates and the organizational literature turn to origins to ground concepts of difference. This attests to the power of narratives of descent in defining current interests. Second, organization studies have relied on images of a clear past which had eliminated racialization and its implications. Whereas culture is considered progressive, as a user‐friendly term it has served as a “surrogate” or “homologue” for race. Diversity, in turn, has been deployed both to harbour and to control difference in organization.

Research limitations/implications

The Black Athena debates alert people to the authority of scholars and practitioners in normalising identity categories in organization. They challenge people to develop theories and practices of organizational diversity that are open to ongoing difference rather than essence and origin.

Originality/value

Derrida's contribution has rarely been used in organizational history, particularly its implication with Hegel's legacy to the historical and cultural canon. The paper invites readers to rethink the notions of race, culture and diversity by examining their historical development and considering the history of their inclusion into the canons of management and organization. Historicising can unsettle entrenched assumptions, but the cautionary word is that it can also legitimate current practices by identifying their relevance since “the beginning”.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Scott Walter

The purpose of this article is to identify opportunities for effective collaboration between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify opportunities for effective collaboration between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing services to students of color.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method was used to gather demographic information about students affiliated with one of four “cultural centers” at Washington State University and to generate descriptive statistics regarding their patterns of information use and the degree to which they made use of library resources and services.

Findings

Findings are reported in five tables describing library use by students of color as well as their preferences for targeted library programming. Survey results were used to identify a number of potential service enhancements to encourage more effective use of library and information resources by students of color.

Research limitations/implications

Survey dissemination was limited to those students either actively affiliated with one of four cultural centers sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Services, or involved in the Academic Enrichment programs sponsored by that office. Survey results suggest that additional inquiry is needed into the development of substantive and sustainable partnerships between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing services to students of color.

Practical implications

Provides a number of discrete approaches to providing more effective library resources and services to students of color within the framework both of liaison with academic departments and of co‐curricular service frameworks.

Originality/value

Builds a framework for service‐based liaison with student communities of color that transcends the familiar discussions related to building library collections that reflect the history and experience of racial and ethnic minority groups. Insight into minority student use of libraries and into avenues for collaboration with multicultural student service programs may be useful to librarians on any college campus with a well‐defined framework for minority student services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Mary Ann Danowitz, Edeltraud Hanappi‐Egger and Roswitha Hofmann

The purpose of this paper is to provide concepts and strategies to successfully introduce and implement curricular change; especially, related to incorporating diversity

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide concepts and strategies to successfully introduce and implement curricular change; especially, related to incorporating diversity management into academic programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing documents and accounts from two agents involved in the change process and an outside observer, an inductive‐deductive approach is applied employing concepts of exploration and exploitation from the organizational innovation literature in order to describe a 12‐month process and the resultant curriculum at a major European university.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the importance of external conditions, organizational structures and their relationship to strategies that balance exploration and exploitation to graft a new academic concentration to existing academic programs.

Practical implications

The paper offers concepts, strategies, and lessons to assist colleges and universities to assess the internal and external organizational environment and the availability of resources and to plan approaches to successfully introduce and develop curricular change around sensitive topics such as diversity, gender, equality.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to apply George March's work on organizational exploration and exploitation to curricular change. It offers valuable information for those seeking to create a more inclusive curriculum.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Regina Koury, Jenny Lynne Semenza and Sandra Shropshire

The purpose of this paper is to describe survey findings on diversity and inclusion initiatives at the Carnegie Doctoral Research Institutions of Higher Education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe survey findings on diversity and inclusion initiatives at the Carnegie Doctoral Research Institutions of Higher Education libraries. The findings would be helpful to libraries that are at the beginning of their own diversity and inclusion initiatives or that wish to compare ongoing efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey of Carnegie Doctoral Research Institutions of Higher Education libraries using Qualtrics, an online survey software. Link to the survey with a short explanation was e-mailed to the 324 identified contacts and 151 responses were received at the end of the survey.

Findings

Survey responses revealed that the most prevalent types of diversity and inclusion initiatives fall into one of three categories. These are the creation/enhancement of library collections, recruitment and collaboration with other campus units. Not surprisingly, lack of money and other resources are identified as challenges faced by those who engage in these initiatives.

Originality/value

No other research currently exists for those interested in assessing diversity and inclusion initiatives at the Carnegie Doctoral Research Institutions of Higher Education libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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