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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Abraham Zakaria, Shaibu Baanni Azumah, Gilbert Dagunga and Mark Appiah-Twumasi

The purpose of this study is to estimate the profitability of rice production for irrigated and rain-fed farmers; determine the factors that influence farmers' decision to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to estimate the profitability of rice production for irrigated and rain-fed farmers; determine the factors that influence farmers' decision to participate in irrigation and the impact of irrigation on rice farmers' profitability in northern Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cross-sectional data collected from 543 rice farmers in northern Ghana, the study employed both non-parametric (cost benefit analysis) and parametric (endogenous switching regression) approaches to analyse the data.

Findings

The empirical results reveal a significant difference between the profits of irrigated (GHS 2442.30) and rain-fed farmers (GHS 576.20), as well as the cost-benefit ratios between irrigators (2.53) and rain-fed farmers (1.37). Also, participation in irrigation was found to be influenced by relatively small farm size and off-farm income; while profitability was influenced by membership in a farmer-based organization, access to agricultural extension services and perception of decreasing rainfall intensity. Irrigation also had a positive significant net impact on profitability of rice production.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide justification for development partners and the government of Ghana through the “one-village-one-dam” policy, to invest in irrigation in northern Ghana in order to improve household welfare as well as build resilience for sustainable production systems.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to provide a robust analysis of the difference in profits of rain-fed and irrigated rice farmers while estimating the determinants of Ghanaian farmers' choice of either of the regimes within a bias-corrected framework.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Kamarulzaman Nordin, Mohd Ariff Jamaludin, Mansur Ahmad, Hashim W. Samsi, Abdul Hamid Salleh and Zaihan Jalaludin

This paper discusses the results from the initiative that has been undertaken to utilize residues from oil palm re‐plantation, particularly the oil palm trunk (OPT) for…

Abstract

This paper discusses the results from the initiative that has been undertaken to utilize residues from oil palm re‐plantation, particularly the oil palm trunk (OPT) for the production of laminated veneer lumber (LVL). Efficient use of such residues is vital in order to minimize the environmental burdens associated with the disposal of the oil palm residues, thus ensuring the future growth of Malaysian palm oil industry. The bending and compression strength of the OPT LVL produced were accessed and compared with Malaysian oak (formerly known as rubberwood), timber species that is commonly used in the manufacture of furniture in Malaysia. Properties of OPT LVL were found almost comparable to solid Malaysian oak in terms of bending and compression strength. Combination of OPT veneers with several layers of Malaysian oak veneers during the process of LVL manufacturing has resulted in the improvement in bending and compression strength of the LVL as compared to those produced entirely from OPT. In addition, such practice also produced LVL board with far less variation in strength properties as compared to solid OPT properties. With further research and development embarked upon the gluability of the OPT materials, the overall performance of the OPT LVL could be improved for commercial utilization of OPT wastes in the near future. Development higher value‐added by‐products from oil palm industry residues, would benefit the industry through reduction of the overall environmental burden and would place it on a new environmentally sustainable platform.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Abraham Bernstein, Peter Vorburger and Patrice Egger

People are subjected to a multitude of interruptions. In order to manage these interruptions it is imperative to predict a person's interruptability – his/her current…

Abstract

Purpose

People are subjected to a multitude of interruptions. In order to manage these interruptions it is imperative to predict a person's interruptability – his/her current readiness or inclination to be interrupted. This paper aims to introduce the approach of direct interruptability inference from sensor streams (accelerometer and audio data) in a ubiquitous computing setup and to show that it provides highly accurate and robust predictions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors argue that scenarios are central for evaluating the performance of ubiquitous computing devices (and interruptability predicting devices in particular) and prove this on the setup employed, which was based on that of Kern and Schiele.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that scenarios provide the foundation for avoiding misleading results, and provide the basis for a stratified scenario‐based learning model, which greatly speeds up the training of such devices.

Practical implications

The direct prediction seems to be competitive or even superior to indirect prediction methods and no drawbacks have been observed yet.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a method for accurately predicting a person's interruptability directly from simple sensors without any intermediate steps/symbols.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Zakaria Maamar, Quan Z. Sheng, Samir Tata, Djamal Benslimane and Mohamed Sellami

In any critical system, high‐availability of software components like web services has so far been achieved through replication. Three replication strategies known as…

Abstract

Purpose

In any critical system, high‐availability of software components like web services has so far been achieved through replication. Three replication strategies known as active, passive, and hybrid, describe for example how many replicas are needed, where to locate replicas, and how replicas interact with the original web service and among themselves if needed. The purpose of this paper is to show how replicates could be substituted with components that are similarly functional to the component that needs back‐up in case of failure.

Design/methodology/approach

After examination of the different existing replication strategies, it was decided to test the suitability of the proposed web services high‐availability approach based on communities for each strategy. To this end, the specification of web services using two behaviors, namely control and operational, was deemed appropriate.

Findings

The active replication strategy is the only strategy that could support the development of a web services high‐availability approach based on communities of web services.

Practical implications

The proposed approach has been validated in practice by deploying a JXTA‐based testbed. The experimental work has implemented the active replication strategy.

Originality/value

Software component high‐availability could be achieved by components that are similarly functional to this component, which permits the common limitations of existing replication strategies to be addressed.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Hasan Cinnioğlu

The current Industry 4.0 era is considered not only as a process that dominates technological developments but also as a process that influences the leadership styles…

Abstract

The current Industry 4.0 era is considered not only as a process that dominates technological developments but also as a process that influences the leadership styles. Management 4.0 is essential for businesses to find and apply the appropriate technologies in the age of Industry 4.0. The leadership styles that business managers will adopt in order to be successful in this process and to survive in an intensely competitive environment can play an important role. At this point, a significant problem arises: identifying leadership styles that will bring success. In this context, the primary purpose of this chapter is to explain the modern leadership styles that business managers can adopt or follow in the age of Industry 4.0. In line with this purpose, the chapter first describes the historical development of leadership, leadership theories and modern leadership styles, such as transactional, transformational, technological, strategic, visionary and agile leadership, and all these concepts are discussed based on the Industry 4.0 perspective.

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Azlan Amran, Abdul Manaf Rosli Bin and Bin Che Haat Mohd Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the availability of risk disclosures in the annual reports of Malaysian companies by focusing on the non‐financial section of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the availability of risk disclosures in the annual reports of Malaysian companies by focusing on the non‐financial section of the reports. In addition, the paper aims to empirically test the sampled companies' characteristics and to compare the levels of risk faced by these companies with the disclosures made.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used in this study is content analysis. A total of 100 listed companies' annual reports were analyzed in order to trace the extent of risk disclosure and the relationship against firm characteristic and diversification strategy were tested. Stakeholder theory was used in explaining the linkages between the variables.

Findings

The total number of sentences dedicated for discussion of risk information by the sampled Malaysian companies is very much less when compared to a 2006 study done by Lisley and Shrives in the UK. Size does matter and proven significant by the regression results. This finding is expected and explainable from stakeholder theory.

Research limitations/implications

Future research is encouraged to look deeper into the different variables that may be involved. The development of a local risk measurement checklist will help researchers to better reflect on the findings in the local context.

Practical implications

Findings in regards of the current state of risk disclosure should be of concern to relevant reg ulatory bodies.

Originality/value

This paper provides an initial understanding of risk management disclosure practices in Malaysia. The government, through various relevant parties, should devise the means to enhance companies' involvement in risk management disclosure practices.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Fredrik Karlsson, Joachim Åström and Martin Karlsson

The aim of this paper is to survey existing information security culture research to scrutinise the kind of knowledge that has been developed and the way in which this…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to survey existing information security culture research to scrutinise the kind of knowledge that has been developed and the way in which this knowledge has been brought about.

Design/methodology/approach

Results are based on a literature review of information security culture research published between 2000 and 2013 (December).

Findings

This paper can conclude that existing research has focused on a broad set of research topics, but with limited depth. It is striking that the effects of different information security cultures have not been part of that focus. Moreover, existing research has used a small repertoire of research methods, a repertoire that is more limited than in information systems research in general. Furthermore, an extensive part of the research is descriptive, philosophical or theoretical – lacking a structured use of empirical data – which means that it is quite immature.

Research limitations/implications

Findings call for future research that: addresses the effects of different information security cultures; addresses the identified research topics with greater depth; focuses more on generating theories or testing theories to increase the maturity of this subfield of information security research; and uses a broader set of research methods. It would be particularly interesting to see future studies that use intervening or ethnographic approaches because, to date, these have been completely lacking in existing research.

Practical implications

Findings show that existing research is, to a large extent, descriptive, philosophical or theoretical. Hence, it is difficult for practitioners to adopt these research results, such as frameworks for cultivating or assessment tools, which have not been empirically validated.

Originality/value

Few state-of-the-art reviews have sought to assess the maturity of existing research on information security culture. Findings on types of research methods used in information security culture research extend beyond the existing knowledge base, which allows for a critical discussion about existing research in this sub-discipline of information security.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Krishna Prasad, K. Sankaran and Nandan Prabhu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the empirical relationship between gray directors (non-executive non-independent directors) and executive compensation among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the empirical relationship between gray directors (non-executive non-independent directors) and executive compensation among companies listed in India’s National Stock Exchange (NSE). The paper also examines the possible interplay of relationships between controlling shareholder duality (controlling shareholder being the CEO), ownership category and executive compensation.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 438 firms listed in the NSE of India was studied using data spanning five financial years, 2012–2013 to 2016–2017.

Findings

Empirical evidence suggests that there is a positive association between the proportion of gray directors on the board and executive compensation. The sensitivity of executive compensation to gray directors is found to be higher among family controlled firms. This research has also found that CEOs who belong to controlling shareholder groups received higher pay than professional CEOs. The authors conjecture that these results suggest cronyism and may contribute to lower levels of corporate governance practices in the country.

Research limitations/implications

The hybrid board structure, which India has adopted with the desire to bring the best of Anglo Saxon and Japanese board philosophies, has paradoxically led to self-serving boards. Exploration of alternative thinking to bring about changes in the regulatory framework is, therefore, necessary.

Originality/value

Serious problems are identified with the philosophy behind board composition mandated by Listing Requirements for Indian firms with empirical evidence showing how the existing rules generate cronyism and unfairness to minority shareholders.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8494

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Abdalla Mohamed Bashir

The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the awareness level of non-Muslim consumers to purchasing halal food products. Research on the non-Muslim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the awareness level of non-Muslim consumers to purchasing halal food products. Research on the non-Muslim consumers’ awareness towards purchasing halal food products is poorly understood so far in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was adopted to explore new points of views about a particular issue, which is unknown, or not much known about it, to formulate ideas or propositions. Semi-structured interviews were the major primary data collection method. Four non-Muslim consumers from different settings purposively were selected. Thematic data analysis procedures were used.

Findings

The study found that non-Muslim consumers in Cape Town have a positive awareness of halal food, including its benefits and the production processes involved in producing it. The study also concluded that halal is not merely a commercial name using as a trademark in the global market. However, halal has several dimensions; primarily, for non-Muslim consumers, it is a mark of health and hygiene. With regard to psychological aspect, halal is considered as a sign of trust, comfortable and safe. It gives consumers a peace of mind when they consume food products that carry the halal label.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations in the study should be acknowledged. The main limitation of the study is that a small sample size was selected for this study. Another limitation is that the study was only conducted in the city of Cape Town.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative study of its kind that presents an empirical evidence about the awareness of the non-Muslim consumers towards purchasing halal food products in South Africa, in general, and in Cape Town, in particular.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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