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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Abhishek Pathak, Carlos Velasco and Gemma Anne Calvert

With trade amounting to more than US$400bn, counterfeiting is already affecting many successful brands. Often, consumers are deceived into buying fake products due to the…

Abstract

Purpose

With trade amounting to more than US$400bn, counterfeiting is already affecting many successful brands. Often, consumers are deceived into buying fake products due to the visual similarity between fake and original brand logos. This paper aims to explore the varying forms of fraudulent imitation of original brand logotypes (operationalized at the level of logotype transposition), which can aid in the detection of a counterfeit brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Across two studies, this research tested how well consumers can differentiate counterfeit from original logos of well-known brands both explicitly and implicitly. Seven popular brand logos were altered to create different levels of visual dissimilarity and participants were required to discriminate the logos as fake or genuine.

Findings

Results demonstrate that although consumers can explicitly discriminate fake logos with a high degree of accuracy, the same is not true under conditions in which logos are presented very briefly (tapping participants’ implicit or automatic logo recognition capabilities), except when the first and last letters of the logotype are substituted.

Originality/value

A large body of research on counterfeit trade focuses on the individual or cross-cultural differences behind the prevalence of counterfeit trade. There is limited research exploring the ability of a consumer to correctly identify a fake logo, based on its varying similarity with the original logotype; this paper addresses this gap. Given that many of the purchase decisions are often made automatically, identifying key implicit differentiators that can help a consumer recognize a fake logo should be informative to both practitioners and academics.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Abhishek Pathak, Carlos Velasco and Gemma Anne Calvert

Counterfeiting is a menace in the emerging markets and many successful brands are falling prey to it. Counterfeit brands not only deceive consumers but also fuel a demand…

Abstract

Purpose

Counterfeiting is a menace in the emerging markets and many successful brands are falling prey to it. Counterfeit brands not only deceive consumers but also fuel a demand for lower priced replicas, both of which can devalue the bona-fide brand. But can consumers accurately identify a counterfeit logo? This paper aims to explore this question and examines the accuracy and speed with which a consumer can identify a counterfeit (vs original) logo.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven popular brand logos were altered by transposing and substituting the first and last letters of the logotypes. Consumers then classified the logos as counterfeit (vs original) across two experiments.

Findings

Participants were faster and more accurate in identifying a counterfeit logo when the first letter (vs last letter) of a logotype was manipulated, thus revealing last letter manipulations of a brand’s logotype to be more deceptive.

Research limitations/implications

This paper comments only on the manipulation of logotypes but not of logo symbols. Similarly, findings may not be generalizable across languages which are read from right to left.

Practical implications

Counterfeit trade is already a multibillion dollar industry. Understanding the key perceptual differentiators between a counterfeit (vs original) logo can be insightful for both consumers and firms alike.

Originality/value

Research available on objective measures of similarities (vs dissimilarities) between counterfeit (vs original) brand logos is limited. This paper contributes by examining the ability of consumers to discriminate between counterfeit (vs original) logos at different levels of visual similarity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Nebojsa S. Davcik, Piyush Sharma, Ricky Chan and Rajat Roy

The purpose of this paper is to present the contemporary thinking on deliberate lookalikes and to provide a better understanding of its key forms (counterfeits, copycats…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the contemporary thinking on deliberate lookalikes and to provide a better understanding of its key forms (counterfeits, copycats and no-name imitations) and markets (deceptive and non-deceptive).

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial contains a review of current and past literature on deliberate lookalikes along with summaries of all the articles accepted for publication in the special issue on deliberate lookalikes. The guest editors used academic databases such as Web of Science to find the most representative scholarly work on deliberate lookalikes literature.

Findings

This editorial identifies pertinent research gaps in the literature on deliberate lookalikes. The five selected articles address some of these research gaps and provide useful insights on the purchase and usage of deliberate lookalikes along with directions for future research and ways to apply different research methods that could have important implications for scholars and managers.

Originality/value

The editorial and special issue extends the knowledge about the deliberate lookalikes and their effects on firms, brands and consumers. This work opens new avenues for the research about different forms and markets in the context of lookalikes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Rambalak Yadav, Abhishek Kumar Dokania and Govind Swaroop Pathak

The present study aims to explore the influence of green marketing functions (green activities, corporate communication of green activities and green image) on corporate…

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4294

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to explore the influence of green marketing functions (green activities, corporate communication of green activities and green image) on corporate image in the hospitality sector. Further, the study tries to explore the consumer’s intention to visit the hotels practicing green marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using snowball sampling approach, a total of 220 usable responses were obtained from the consumer via an internet survey. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling to evaluate the strength of relationship and model fit.

Findings

The findings show that green/eco-friendly activities and green image significantly influence the corporate image of the hotel, which in turn results into significant positive impact over consumer’s intention to visit the hotel. No significant influence of corporate communication of green activities on corporate image of the hotels was found, which may be because of the low level of communication of green practices by the hotels in India.

Practical implications

The findings offer insight to the managers regarding the impact of green marketing practices adopted by the hotels on their corporate image which in turn results into increased visit/revisit intention.

Originality/value

The study deals with the topic “the influence of green marketing on corporate image”, which has received scant attention by researchers. The paper attempts to provide empirical evidence in this area. The study yields several implications that can be helpful for managers while devising green marketing strategies for the hospitality sector. The study is among the initial studies exploring the influence of green marketing on corporate image in the Indian context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Meena Goswami, Vikas Pathak, Sanjay Bharti, Veer Singh, Tanuja Singh and Abhishek Sengar

– The present study was aimed to enhance the nutritional quality of veg bottle gourd balls by incorporating boiled mashed egg replacing bottle guard in the formulation of batter.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study was aimed to enhance the nutritional quality of veg bottle gourd balls by incorporating boiled mashed egg replacing bottle guard in the formulation of batter.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different levels, viz. 50, 60 and 70 per cent of boiled mashed whole egg were taken to optimize the level of egg in veg balls by replacing the bottle gourd. The developed products were evaluated for physico-chemical, proximate analysis and sensory evaluation on Day 0, 3, 6 and 9 of storage, whereas microbiological studies of the product were conducted on Day 1, 4, 7 and 10.

Findings

The pH, cooking yield and weight gain were non significantly higher in egg-incorporated balls as compared to control. Similar trends were observed for mean Thio Barbituric Acid (TBA) and free fatty acid (FFA) values, however, the estimated values remained within the acceptable limit throughout the storage period. Mean protein and fat content were significantly (p < 0.05) higher and the moisture content was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in egg-incorporated balls. There was no significant difference for mean Total Plate Count, Yeast and mould count and Psychrophillic count between the treatments and control during storage except at later stage on Day 7 and 10. The mean sensory scores were found to be the highest for egg balls, with 60 per cent boiled mashed whole egg for all sensory attributes and the flavor was very much liked by the sensory panelists.

Research limitations/implications

The trials can be further carried out for some color and properties, with the addition of various antioxidants and antimicrobial agents.

Originality/value

Veg bottle gourd balls are a very much relished delicacy of Indian culinary practices. The incorporation of egg not only enhanced the nutritional properties, also improved the flavor and consumer acceptance. It can be a very good alternative to cope up with malnutrition and hunger.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Swati Shastri, Shruti Shastri, Abhishek Pareek and Riddhi Sudhan Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the motivational drives of women entrepreneurs and highlight the challenges faced by women entrepreneurs operating micro, small and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the motivational drives of women entrepreneurs and highlight the challenges faced by women entrepreneurs operating micro, small and medium enterprises from an institutional perspective in Rajasthan – a patriarchal state in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data collected from a questionnaire survey conducted from July 2018 to January 2019 on 347 women entrepreneurs operating in seven districts of Rajasthan. Descriptive and factor analysis were used to find the major motivations and challenges of the entrepreneurs.

Findings

The findings indicate that intrinsic factors, namely, growth, creativity, autonomy and rejecting stereotypical gender identity are primary motivations driving women entrepreneurship in Rajasthan. Further, institutions pose challenges rather than offering a motivational drive to female entrepreneurs. The two most critical challenges, which the women entrepreneurs face are gender stereotypes and the lack of social capital. In patriarchal societies, entrepreneurial roles are considered masculine than feminine. Furthermore, cultural norms reflected in gender-specific role distribution result in the problem of work-life balance. The lack of both bonding and bridging social capital in terms of family support and networks, respectively, also reflects an unfavorable informal institutional environment.

Originality/value

The study adds to the sparse empirical literature on the motivations and challenges of women entrepreneurs in the Indian context. This study explores the motivations and challenges of female entrepreneurs from an institutional perspective for India in general and Rajasthan, in particular, using a large, heterogeneous sample using factor analysis.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Swati Shastri, Shruti Shastri and Abhishek Pareek

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motivations and key challenges women entrepreneurs experience in running small businesses in the Jaipur city of Rajasthan.

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1115

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motivations and key challenges women entrepreneurs experience in running small businesses in the Jaipur city of Rajasthan.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample of 13 women entrepreneurs from a cross-section of enterprises is selected. A qualitative methodology based upon semi-structured, in-depth, exploratory interviews with female entrepreneurs is used which enables the respondents to give voice to their individual experiences.

Findings

The study reveals that pull factors including the urge for creativity, innovation, self-identity and independence, and to serve the society are the main motivations for female entrepreneurs to start their venture. From the institutional theory perspective, the challenges of female entrepreneurs originate mainly from informal institutions. A significant challenge is that their ability as a professional entrepreneur is not recognized and acknowledged by the society. Furthermore, the cultural norms reflected in the gender-specific role distribution result in the problem of work–life balance. The challenges emerging from the formal institutions do not appear to be pervasive and gender specific.

Originality/value

The unique contribution of the study is to provide evidences on the motivations and challenges of women entrepreneurs in Rajasthan based on qualitative data derived from in-depth interviews. Furthermore, the study is the first attempt to view the motivations and challenges of female entrepreneurs from an institutional perspective for India in general and Rajasthan in particular.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Anand Prakash, Sanjay Kumar Jha, Kapil Deo Prasad and Abhishek Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate linkage among productivity, quality, and business performance in home-based brassware units in India.

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4062

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate linkage among productivity, quality, and business performance in home-based brassware units in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved action research of home-based brassware units applying procedures for three-stage least-squares (3SLS) regression analysis, with data obtained through questionnaire survey based on convenience sampling.

Findings

This study has supported the established belief that quality leads to productivity, and subsequently productivity leads to better business performance for home-based brassware units in India. The consistent and logical result of this study using 3SLS regression analysis has provided empirical understanding of the appropriate linkage among productivity, quality, and business performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study has limitations of findings, as it studied the home-based brassware units in the Indian context only.

Practical implications

This study implies that marketable home-based brassware products are to be produced by taking into account boundaries of production within the framework of goals and value created by motivation and dependability for monitoring the business performance. Identifying an appropriate linkage among productivity, quality, and business performance may project a holistic evaluation of the policy development related to home-based brassware units.

Originality/value

This is an original study to test empirical linkages among productivity, quality, and business performance using 3SLS regression analysis particularly for home-based brassware units in India.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Akanksha Choudhury, Abhishek Behl, Pratima Amol Sheorey and Abhinav Pal

Traditional supply chain arrangements have failed to keep up with escalating customer demands and breakthrough innovations. The way forward is a flexible yet innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional supply chain arrangements have failed to keep up with escalating customer demands and breakthrough innovations. The way forward is a flexible yet innovative network that leverages ecosystem partners and digital tools to unlock new agility. The paper aims at identifying and analyzing numerous critical success factors (CSFs) that may improve the efficiency of a digital supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve CSFs are identified in this paper through an extensive literature survey. Expert opinion has been considered and the hierarchical structure built using total interpretative structural modeling (TISM) which highlights the interdependencies between these CSFs. Cross-impact matrix multiplication (MICMAC) is used to determine the driving and dependence power of each factor.

Findings

This study identified 12 CSFs through an extensive literature survey. The ISM model resulted in six different levels beginning from redesign organization at the bottom of the structure. The TISM model explained why redesigning the organization is pivotal to bringing about novel agility in the supply chain. MICMAC analysis confirmed that the following enhanced the success of a digital supply chain: Sales and Operation Planning Strategies, Strategic Sourcing Techniques, Smart Manufacturing Processes and Warehouse Management.

Research limitations/implications

Various other components contributing to the 12 CSFs identified in this paper may be discovered and detailed in future research. Additionally, further research is required to expand the existing technology-based services structural model to a more empirical form.

Practical implications

This study offers a comprehensive but not exhaustive list of CSFs essential to digital supply chain growth. It will enable market experts and leaders to concentrate on key factors leading to tactical decisions and maximum value for firms.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to add to the body of knowledge on real digitally-led supply chain transformation, which is still in its early stages. This study is one of the first, if not the first, to examine success factors critical to the improvement of the performance of the supply chain. It lays the foundation for further research in this field.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Tulsi Jayakumar

To understand: – the demand and supply side challenges in launching a new product in sports. – Factors, which go into the making of a successful “new” sport. – The role of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

To understand: – the demand and supply side challenges in launching a new product in sports. – Factors, which go into the making of a successful “new” sport. – The role of planning in sport management.

Case overview/synopsis

In July 2017, on the eve of Pro Kabaddi League (PKL) Season 5, kabaddi had emerged as one of India’s most important non-cricketing sport. PKL was India’s first men’s professional kabaddi league, introduced by Mashal Sports and Star India in 2014. Kabaddi was an indigenous sport, and India had an unbeaten international track record as world champions. Yet, the sport and its players had never received their due in India. In 2017, while kabaddi’s popularity had increased, leading to sponsorship opportunities, huge player bids, prize money and television viewership, all was not quite hunky-dory. A women’s kabaddi league introduced only the previous year had not been continued, despite an extended format in 2017. The audience profile also did not match that envisaged by Star. As a unique creator of sports content, Star was in an enviable position in India; and so was Kabaddi as a sport. How had Star created a new property around an indigenous sport with rural and rustic associations, transforming it into a snazzy, up-market sport within just three years, even while leagues involving other popular sports failed to create a mark? Could Star sustain this interest? How could kabaddi retain its “star” position within Star’s stable?

Complexity academic level

In an undergraduate or a postgraduate programme in business administration.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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