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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Aswini Kumar Mishra, Abhishek Kumar Sinha, Abhijeet Khasnis and Sai Theja Vadlamani

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies three different types of innovation measures then further analyses their relation with the productivity of the firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for this study has incorporated the structural Crépon-Douget-Mairesse (CDM) model wherein productivity is measured using both the innovation inputs and the innovation outputs. Three main equations have been used to quantify this relation includes the knowledge intensity function, innovation function and the productivity equation.

Findings

Findings indicate that decision to invest in research and development (R&D) is influenced negatively by financial obstacles and trade obstacles and positively influenced by telecommunication obstacles, government obstacles and the size of the firm in India. Similarly, financial obstacles and the size of the firm are affecting the firm’s research expenditure per employee. Also, financial obstacles seem to hinder the research intensity and larger firms seem to have higher research intensity. The size of the firm contributes significantly to product innovation. However, R&D spending seems to be negatively related to the innovation outcome. The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms. However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner.

Originality/value

The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms (which has been measured by sales per worker is impacted by the capital and the labour inputs). However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner. The reason could be due to the fact that the definition of organisational innovation incorporates both dissolutions and mergers.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

Manogna R L, Aswini Kumar Mishra and Abhishek Kumar Sinha

The preference of firm internationalization is shaped by different groups of owners and the institutional environment in which the firm operates. Past studies have largely…

Abstract

Purpose

The preference of firm internationalization is shaped by different groups of owners and the institutional environment in which the firm operates. Past studies have largely ignored the heterogeneity among the controlling groups in influencing the internationalization decision in emerging economy firms.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors draw understanding from behavioral risk perspective and institutional theory to inspect the risk perceptions and propensities of various ownership groups such as lending institutions, domestic mutual funds and foreign institutional investors (FIIs). Empirical analysis was conducted from a sample of 2695 unique BSE-listed nonfinancial Indian firms during 2005−2019 period using Tobit panel regression analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that firms' international investments are impacted differently by ownership share of different types of institutional investors after controlling for firm-level resources and capabilities. While lending institutions and FIIs are supportive of foreign investments by firms, domestic mutual funds are not supportive of this strategic decision on foreign investment.

Research limitations/implications

Further, our results show that family ownership, measured in terms of family shareholding, negatively moderates the lending institutions toward internationalization and does not impact the FIIs and mutual fund investor's decision regarding the foreign investments.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, the current paper is the first to address the risk perceptions of various ownership groups on firm's international outlook in an emerging economy context with the latest data. This practical perspective helps the organizations in managing the ownership holdings.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Aswini Kumar Mishra, Anil Kumar and Abhishek Sinha

Though Indian economy since 1980s has expanded very rapidly, yet the benefits of growth remain very unequally distributed. The purpose of this paper is to provide new…

Abstract

Purpose

Though Indian economy since 1980s has expanded very rapidly, yet the benefits of growth remain very unequally distributed. The purpose of this paper is to provide new evidence about the shape, intensity and decomposition of inequality change between 2005 and 2012. The authors find that Gini, as a measure of income inequality, has increased irrespective of geographic regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a recent distribution analysis tool, “ABG,” the paper focuses on local inequality, and summarizes the shape of inequality in terms of three inequality parameters (α, β and γ) to examine how the income distributions have changed over time. Here, the central coefficient (α) measures inequality at the median level, with adjustment parameters at the top (β) and bottom (γ).

Findings

The results reveal that at the middle of distribution (α), there is almost the same inequality in both the periods, but the coefficients on the curvature parameters β and γ show that there is increasing inequality in the subsequent period. Finally, an analysis of decomposition of inequality change suggests that though income growth was progressive, however, this equalizing effect was more than offset by the disequalizing effect of income reranking.

Research limitations/implications

This paper shows how it can be possible both for “the poor” to fare badly relatively to “the rich” and for income growth to be pro-poor.

Practical implications

This paper stresses the significance of inequality reduction.

Social implications

Inequality reduction is very much imperative in ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity.

Originality/value

Perhaps, this research work is first of its kind to examine the shape and decomposition of change in income inequality in India in recent years.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Case study
Publication date: 28 July 2017

Sujo Thomas, Abhishek, Sanket Vatavwala and Piyush Kumar Sinha

BigBasket.com, an online supermarket established in December 2011 in Bangalore, India, had become one of the major players in the Indian online grocery market by the end…

Abstract

BigBasket.com, an online supermarket established in December 2011 in Bangalore, India, had become one of the major players in the Indian online grocery market by the end of March 2016.1 Run by Innovative Retail Concepts Private Limited, BigBasket.com was operating in more than 23 cities across the country in 2016. The online grocery market in India was in a stage of growth and transformation, fuelled by India's large urban population who sought a lifestyle of convenience and ease. It had also attracted many entrepreneurs who competed fiercely with each other in a market characterised by thin margins. Intense competition ensured that only a few companies were able to survive and sustain themselves. One of these companies was Big Basket, which succeeded in spite of the competition, attracting Series Da funding worth USD 150b million from the United Arab Emirates-based Abraaj Group in March 2016.2

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Abhishek Behl, Pankaj Dutta, Pratima Sheorey and Rajesh Kumar Singh

The study explores the role of dialogic public communication and information quality (IQ) in evaluating the operational performance of donation-based crowdfunding (DBC…

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores the role of dialogic public communication and information quality (IQ) in evaluating the operational performance of donation-based crowdfunding (DBC) tasks. These tasks are primarily used to support disaster relief operations. The authors also test the influence of cognitive trust and swift trust as moderating variables in explaining the relationship between both IQ and dialogic communication with operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a primary survey to test the hypotheses. A total of 203 responses were collected from multiple crowdfunding platforms. The authors used archival data from task creators on donation-based crowdfunding platforms, and a structured questionnaire is also used to collect responses. Data are analyzed using Warp PLS 6.0. Warp PLS 6.0 works on the principle of partial least square (PLS) structured equation modeling (SEM) and has been used widely to test path analytical models.

Findings

The authors found out that the operational performance is explained significantly by the quality of information and its association with dialogic public communication. The results support the arguments offered by dialogic public communication theory and trust transfer theory in assessing the operational success of DBC. The study also confirms that cognitive trust positively moderates the relationship between IQ and organizational public dialogic communication and operational performance. It is also revealed that the duration of the DBC task has no significant control over dialogic public communication.

Practical implications

The study lays practical foundations for task creators on DBC platforms and website designers as it sets the importance of both IQ and dialogic communication channels. The communication made by the task creator and/or the DBC platforms with the donors and potential donors in the form of timely and appropriate information forms the key to the success of any DBC task. The study also helps task creators choose a suitable platform to improve performance.

Originality/value

The authors propose a unique framework by integrating two theoretical perspectives: dialogic public relation theory and trust transfer theory in understanding the operational performance of donation-based crowdfunding tasks. The authors address DBC tasks catering to disaster relief operations by collecting responses from task creators on DBC platforms. The study uniquely positions itself in the area of information and communication.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Ritu Tripathi and Abhishek Kumar

To identify the characteristic features of humanistic leadership in the Tata group in India, and to explicate the key facilitating factors.

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the characteristic features of humanistic leadership in the Tata group in India, and to explicate the key facilitating factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative case-study inquiry via semi-structured interviews with top management leaders and middle managers, and secondary sources of information.

Findings

The top leaders of the Tata companies emphasised the following values and leadership experience: (1) Adherence to the founder's philosophy and the basic core values, (2) Leadership with Trust, (3) Community as the key purpose of the enterprise, (4) Senior leaders as mentors and role-models, (5) Abiding by the ethical code of conduct, (6) Employee-focus and (7) Tacit alignment with Indian cultural values. These resonated with the humanistic leadership tenets. Based on the literature the authors also identified that in Tata leadership, there is an amalgamation of personal values (humata, hukhta, hvarshta: good thought, word and deed) and national cultural ethos (dharma, karma and jnana: emphasis on duty-bound action and knowledge). These leadership values are conveyed and institutionalised in the organisation via strategic initiatives such as the Tata Trusts, Tata Business Excellence Model, Tata Code of Conduct. This synergy of personal values, national cultural ethos and organisational strategy makes Tata group realise the humanistic leadership objectives, while achieving business targets.

Research limitations/implications

The thematic analysis of interview data provides a contextualised understanding of how humanistic leadership gets realised at both the individual behavioural level, as well as at the broader organisational strategic level. This provides inputs to building the theory of humanistic leadership.

Practical implications

By unravelling the factors that facilitate the realisation of humanistic leadership in the Tata group, the authors provide an exemplar for other organisations and business leaders to draw insights from.

Social implications

Humanistic leadership, oriented towards upliftment of community and society, and not just profit maximisation, is critical to creating a more sustainable and peaceful world.

Originality/value

This is one of first studies that conceptualises the Tata leadership from the humanistic perspective. The theoretical insights are of basic and applied use.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2019

Ayon Chakraborty, Michael Mutingi and Abhishek Vashishth

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have now become an important part of economy for not only developed nations but also for emerging economies. Irrespective of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have now become an important part of economy for not only developed nations but also for emerging economies. Irrespective of the benefits that can be derived, SMEs in emerging economies still lack the will to implement quality management (QM) practices. Using a comparative study, the purpose of this paper is to understand the status of QM practices in SMEs of emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based approach was adopted to understand the established QM practices in the SMEs. A survey instrument was designed by reviewing the literature on QM initiatives in SMEs. A sample of 270 SMEs across Southern India and 189 SMEs in Namibia was selected through stratified random sampling technique.

Findings

The overall response rate was 19.52 percent for India and 26.46 percent for Namibia, respectively. There were similarities and differences in responses from SMEs in both countries. Similarities are in terms of limited implementation of QM practices, and also less use of tools and techniques. Reasons for not implementing include unknown to the authors, and the high cost of training. Differences emerged in the type of market (Indian SMEs catering to one major customer), CSFs and business performance indicators. It was interesting to find that management commitment and involvement do not have a major influence as CSF for SMEs in both the countries.

Originality/value

The research is the first attempt in bringing a comparative study about QM practices in SMEs from developing countries. The insights will help emerging economies to develop policies for education and training, and thus facilitate implementation of QM practices in SMEs.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Abhishek Srivastava, Parimal Kumar and Arqum Mateen

This study analyzes supplier development investment decisions under a triadic setting (two buyers and a common supplier). In a triadic setting, the supplier development…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyzes supplier development investment decisions under a triadic setting (two buyers and a common supplier). In a triadic setting, the supplier development investment decision of one buyer can have a spillover effect of the benefits on other buyer. Therefore, it is utmost important for the investing buyer to understand the impact of benefit spillover on other competing buyers'. Therefore, one of the purposes of this study to analyze the supplier development investment decision of buyers under two scenarios. First, under cooperative development structure where both buyers jointly invest in supplier and share equal benefits. Second, non-cooperative investment structure where both buyers individually invest in supplier development and share unequal benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to assess the impact of supplier development investment decisions on the profitability of buyers and the common supplier, the authors used game-theoretic approach. The authors design a Stackelberg leader-follower game where the supplier acts as Stackelberg leader and buyers follow the supplier's pricing decision to maximize their profit level. Additionally, both buyers decide either to cooperate or non-cooperate while investing in supplier development.

Findings

The results show that the cooperative investment is always an optimal strategy for buyers and supplier. Interestingly, the efficient buyer's share of investment level is lower under non-cooperative investment structure and he is better-off due to its capability of taking advantage from the other buyer's investment. However, the inefficient buyer, on the other hand, is worse-off under non-cooperative investment. Furthermore, comparative analysis between the two shows that initially, the buyer who extracts more profit because of the other buyers' development investment tends to prefer the non-cooperative development investment set up. However, after a certain point, the same buyer is better-off under cooperative development investment through cooperation, and sharing equal benefit of the supplier's development, as the supplier in turn, starts charging a higher wholesale price under non-cooperative investment case.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, extant literature on supplier development has mostly focused on. One supplier-one buyer; thus, the learning spillover effect has almost been unexplored. In real-life, different buyers often purchase from the shared supplier. Therefore, it is important to analyze the spillover of supplier development benefits due to investment of one buyer on other buyer and deriving the condition under which buyers would be incentivized to invest jointly or individually.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Shalini Saha, Amares Chattopadhyay and Abhishek Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to develop a numerical (finite-difference) model exploring phase and group velocities of SH-wave propagation in initially stressed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a numerical (finite-difference) model exploring phase and group velocities of SH-wave propagation in initially stressed transversely isotropic poroelastic multi-layered composite structures and initially stressed viscoelastic-dry-sandy multi-layered composite structures in two distinct cases.

Design/methodology/approach

With the aid of relevant constitutive relations, the non-vanishing equations of motions for the propagation SH-wave in the considered composite structures have been derived. Haskell matrix method and finite-difference scheme are adopted to deduce velocity equation for both the cases. Stability analysis for the adopted finite-difference scheme has been carried out and the expressions for phase as well as group velocity in terms of dispersion-parameter and stability-ratio have been deduced.

Findings

Velocity equations are derived for the propagation of SH-wave in both the composite structures. The obtained results are matched with the classical results for the case of double and triple-layered composite structure along with comparative analysis. Stability analysis have been carried out to develop expressions of phase as well as group velocity in terms of dispersion-parameter and stability-ratio. The effect of wavenumber, dispersion parameter along with initial-stress, porosity, sandiness, viscoelasticity, stability ratio, associated with the said composite structures on phase, damped and group velocities of SH-wave has been unveiled.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, numerical modelling and analysis of propagation characteristics of SH-wave in multi-layered initially stressed composite structures composed of transversely isotropic poroelastic materials and viscoelastic-dry-sandy materials remain unattempted inspite of its importance and relevance in many branches of science and engineering.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Agrata Gupta and Chun Xia

The chapter studies the role of Financial Technology (FinTech) in disrupting the existing traditional banking system. It identifies FinTech’s evolution in Asia across…

Abstract

The chapter studies the role of Financial Technology (FinTech) in disrupting the existing traditional banking system. It identifies FinTech’s evolution in Asia across Deposits & lending, Capital Raising, Investment Management, Market provisioning, Payments, and Insurance. This technology revolution allows us to have a banking system based on values that serve customers better, reduce risk to the society and improve returns for the shareholders. Data on unbanked population, smartphone penetration, and Internet penetration has led to retail side innovations such as Mobile Wallets, P2P Payments, and Real-time Payments in the most of Asia (except China). A total of 49% of Global Investments in FinTech are in Asia and the Chinese dragon alone accounts for 46%. India is witnessing a strong amount of FinTech deals in 2017 and it is being driven by payment and lending solutions. ASEAN FinTech industry is dominated by m-wallets and online payments; this is followed by retail investment and financial comparison. The chapter dives into the challenges Asian banks are facing because of this disruption. Now more than ever, is the important role governments and central banks of each nation play to assess the path these start-ups are headed on and this will unfold the landscape of banking in Asia a few years down the lane.

Details

Banking and Finance Issues in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-453-4

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