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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Abdullahi Y. Shehu

Analyses the alternative and informal remittance systems that characterise many Asian transactions; they are also known as informal value transfer systems, underground…

Abstract

Analyses the alternative and informal remittance systems that characterise many Asian transactions; they are also known as informal value transfer systems, underground banking systems and so on: unlike money laundering, they are not based on deception and may indeed be licensed. Traces the origins of these systems, which are of two main types: the Chinese fei chi’en system and the Indian hawala/hundi system. Describes the two systems, and goes on to the reasons for their growing popularity: the increased migration of Asian populations to the rest of the world, the systems’ perceived efficiency, timeliness, cost effectiveness and lack of bureaucracy, the remoteness from banks of some areas, the desire of the Chinese to conceal wealth, and insufficient supply of foreign exchange in some countries.

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Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Abdullahi Y. Shehu

Defines predicate‐based offences as derivative offences, ie offences like money laundering that depend on the existence of others. Examines gambling as a rational choice…

Abstract

Defines predicate‐based offences as derivative offences, ie offences like money laundering that depend on the existence of others. Examines gambling as a rational choice social activity, estimates the scale of the industry with regard to its revenues and social costs, and considers whether it is predicate for money laundering. Argues that gambling can create wealth, but this wealth is not necessarily illegal, as gambling is not always illegal; gambling is an endeavour like banking, and since the latter is not a predicate for money laundering but an intermediary, so is gambling.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Abdullahi Y. Shehu

Defines corruption, which includes the practices of bribery, nepotism and misappropriation. Gives an overview of the corruption situation in Nigeria. Discusses its…

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1067

Abstract

Defines corruption, which includes the practices of bribery, nepotism and misappropriation. Gives an overview of the corruption situation in Nigeria. Discusses its possible causes, which are seen to be rooted in sociocultural practices and the political and economic situation of the country; however, the greatest cause is the lack of political will to deal with it. Outlines recent efforts to combat corruption, including the establishment of the new Anti‐Corruption Convention and the assistance of the United Nations and donor countries. Focuses on the Abacha case and its lessons, mentioning the specific challenges of global enforcement. Concludes that even the new democratic government’s efforts to eliminate corruption are unlikely to be entirely successful.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Abdullahi Y. Shehu

Examines in detail the various international, legal, policy and institutional principles to deal with money laundering and corruption. Begins with the many United Nations…

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1546

Abstract

Examines in detail the various international, legal, policy and institutional principles to deal with money laundering and corruption. Begins with the many United Nations (UN) initiatives: the 1988 Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, 2000 Convention against Transnational Organised Crime, Convention against Corruption, Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism, Global Programme against Money Laundering, Global Programme against Corruption, Global Programme against Terrorism, Global Programme against Transnational Organised Crime, and Global Programme against Trafficking in Human Beings. Moves on to the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering, the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering, the Inter‐governmental Action Group against Money Laundering in West Africa, the Egmont Group, Interpol, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) initiatives, Basel Declarations, Council of Europe Convention/Directives, Europol, the African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption, Transparency International, and the Wolfsberg Initiative.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Abdullahi Y. Shehu

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of the recent financial crisis and the need for prudential management and effective supervisory and regulatory measures…

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1912

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of the recent financial crisis and the need for prudential management and effective supervisory and regulatory measures in ensuring the stability and integrity of the financial sector, especially financial institutions, such as banks. The aim is to increase awareness about the global Financial Action Task Force (FATF) standards and the efforts at enforcing these standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the impact of the global financial crisis of 2009 and relates it to inadequate enforcement of prudential and regulatory measures. The paper argues that effective implementation of the core and key FATF Recommendations would assure some modicum of stability, productivity, and integrity of the financial system. It also discusses briefly the monitoring process of the implementation of these standards. The paper adopts a policy approach with a view to explaining the importance and benefits of implementing these standards in all jurisdictions. Thus, it covers the work of the anti‐money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) global network in promoting financial sector stability.

Findings

The mutual evaluation process is a demonstration of the commitment of member states to implement the FATF standards and remedy deficiencies in their systems. However, many countries, in particular low‐capacity countries, face challenges in the implementation of the FATF standards. These are: competing priorities for scarce government resources; severe lack of resources and skilled workforce to implement government programmes, including AML/CFT programmes; weaknesses in legal institutions; the dominance of the informal sector and a cash‐based economy; poor document and data‐retention systems; and in some cases, very small financial sector with limited exposure to the international financial system.

Research limitations/implications

For the AML/CFT standards to be enforced more effectively, developing countries need more technical assistance, especially in preventing the flow of proceeds of corruption to developed countries' financial systems. The strategy to recover the proceeds of crime has proven to be problematic, but no better approach has yet been articulated. This should constitute an issue for further research.

Originality/value

The paper aims to increase awareness to the FATF standards and the work of all the global network organizations involved in the fight against ML/TF. It is useful particularly to financial institutions who wish to protect the integrity of their system and promote stability.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Gamal Abdualmajed Ali, Haim Hilman and Abdullahi Hassan Gorondutse

This study aims to examine the joint effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO), market orientation (MO), total quality management (TQM) and organisational performance in…

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1033

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the joint effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO), market orientation (MO), total quality management (TQM) and organisational performance in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s (KSA's) small and medium enterprise (SME) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a quantitative research design. A total of 393 questionnaires were distributed to and collected from owners/managers of SMEs in KSA to acquire requisite data for examining the hypothesised model of the study. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to analyse the research data.

Findings

The results indicate that EO, MO and TQM are positively and significantly related to the organisational performance of SMEs. In addition, the findings reveal that TQM has contributed the most to the enhancement of organisational development, which is followed by EO and finally, MO.

Practical implications

Developing economies consider SMEs as an approach to generate new jobs and enhance economic growth. The results provide owners/managers, practitioners and academicians with an enhanced understanding of the relationship and effects of EO, MO and TQM on organisational performance, particularly in the SME sector. Thus, owners/managers are guided to develop improved and further effective decisions for the implementation of TQM practices with strong EO and MO. Consequently, firms realise superior performance and continuously compete within their market.

Originality/value

From the perspective of developing countries, this study contributes to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence regarding the effects of EO, MO, TQM and SMEs' performance. This study is the first to empirically examine the SME sector within the KSA's economy regarding the new orientation among decision makers in terms of increasing the significance of non-oil activities. This study also confirms the usability of resource-based view theory and strategic orientations variables in the KSA SMEs.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Akume T. Albert and F.C. Okoli

This paper aims to assess if the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria from 2003-2012.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess if the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria from 2003-2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a documentary analytical approach.

Findings

The organization has not been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The study is between 2003-2012.

Practical implications

There is a need to correct those identified inhibitors that undermined the Commission’s capacity, such as intrusive government interference, lack of autonomy, poor funding and weak laws, among others, to mitigate corruption.

Social implications

Eliminating those identified constraints will remove the incentive to be corrupt, thereby curbing the desire to be corrupt.

Originality/value

This paper is an original assessment of the EFCC's effectiveness in combating corruption in Nigeria during the specified period.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Femi Oladele and Timothy G. Oyewole

Abstract

Details

Social Media, Mobile and Cloud Technology Use in Accounting: Value-Analyses in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-161-5

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Najimu Saka, Abdullahi Babatunde Saka, Opeoluwa Akinradewo and Clinton O. Aigbavboa

The complex interaction of politics and the economy is a critical factor for the sustainable growth and development of the construction sector (CNS). This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The complex interaction of politics and the economy is a critical factor for the sustainable growth and development of the construction sector (CNS). This study aims to investigate the effects of type of political administration including democracy and military on the performance of CNS using the Nigerian Construction Sector (NCS) as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A 48 year (1970–2017) time series data (TSD) on the NCS and the gross domestic product (GDP) based on 2010 constant USD were extracted from the United Nations Statistical Department database. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models were used to analyze the TSD. The ANCOVA model includes the GDP as correlational variable or covariate.

Findings

The estimates of the ANOVA model indicate that democratic administration is significantly better than military administration in construction performance. However, the ANCOVA model indicates that the GDP is more important than political administration in the performance of the CNS. The study recommends for a new national construction policy, favourable fiscal and monetary policy, local content development policy and construction credit guaranty scheme for the rapid growth and development of the NCS.

Originality/value

Hitherto, little is known about the influence of political administration on the performance of the CNS. This study provides empirical evidence from a developing economy perspective. It presents the relationships and highlights recommendations for driving growth in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Mohammed Sani Abdullahi, Kavitha Raman and Sakiru Adebola Solarin

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of succession planning practice (SPP) on employee engagement (EE) and employee performance (EP) in Malaysian private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of succession planning practice (SPP) on employee engagement (EE) and employee performance (EP) in Malaysian private universities (MPU).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a survey research design, and the study unit of the analysis consists of the academic staff of MPU. In the selection of the sample from the focused respondents (10,473) of the study, a stratified and simple random sampling method was used, and the study sample consists of 314 MPU academic staff. A questionnaire was used to collect data from the focused respondents while partial least square–structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that SPP has a significant effect on EP, and the relationship between SPP and EP is partially mediated by EE.

Practical implications

Sound succession systems for achieving academic staff performance should be put in place by the university management. Furthermore, the outcome of this research urges the policymaker to come up with a sound policy that can allow internal talents of the university to hold key leadership positions of any nature when the need arises before considering external talents, with that the talents will be satisfied and put decisive effort to achieve a positive result.

Originality/value

This paper has made a significant contribution to the knowledge and operationalization of the EE, EP and SPP literature. The research also assists the university management to mobilize qualified and talented staff for an unexpected and sudden resignation of staff which saves the university the cost of hiring and development, and at the same time, it encourages internal hiring.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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