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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Muhammad S. Tahir, Abdullahi D. Ahmed and Daniel W. Richards

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between financial literacy (FL) and financial well-being (FW). Second, to analyze if non-impulsive future-oriented behavior (NIB) moderates the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the PROCESS macros in IBM SPSS Statistics to test the moderated mediation model and analyze the 2016 wave of the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.

Findings

The empirical analysis shows that FC partially mediates the association between FL and FW. Furthermore, the moderated mediation analysis shows that NIB strengthens the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW. Specifically, the positive associations of FL with FC and FL with FW significantly increase for those consumers who score high on NIB.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the financial services industry. Professional financial planners can positively improve the ability of consumers to deal with their financial matters by highlighting the importance of FL and NIB.

Social implications

The study findings suggest educating consumers to discourage impulsive behavior and encourage them to create financial plans as it will enhance their ability to conduct financial tasks efficiently, improving their FW.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess a moderated mediation model, which examines the role of FC as a mediator variable and NIB as a moderator variable in the association between FL and FW.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Yen Hoang Bui, Delpachitra Sarath and Abdullahi D. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to measure efficiency of superannuation funds using data envelopment analysis (DEA), using data related to financial performance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure efficiency of superannuation funds using data envelopment analysis (DEA), using data related to financial performance of superannuation funds. The sample comprises 183 superannuation funds covering approximately 79 per cent of the 231 largest Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA)-regulated funds in 2012. The research covers a period of seven years from 2005 to 2012. The results indicate that most Australian superannuation funds are inefficient relative to the benchmark efficiency frontier based on efficient funds. The findings emphasise the importance of improving the efficiency of Australian superannuation funds by reducing overall fund expenses to narrow the gap in performance between efficient and inefficient funds.

Design/methodology/approach

This study aims to contribute to policy, theory and practice in several dimensions. Member protection and the efficiency of the superannuation system are topical issues (Donald, 2009). Despite its importance from a regulatory point of view, efficiency has only been discussed in relation to operational issues such as managing agency relationships, fees and charges, investment return or economies of scale. The relative efficiency of the Australian superannuation system from an economic productivity perspective has rarely been examined, except for a study by Njie (2006), where the Malmquist productivity DEA technique was used to measure the efficiency of Australia’s retirement income system.

Findings

Most inefficient funds had very low efficiency scores and were fell into the lower quintiles such as Quintiles 4 (scored 0.200-0.399) and 5 (scored 0.001-0.199). Consequently, input reduction targets were significantly higher for these two quintiles. Similarly, input reduction targets were high under the period DEA estimates. In order to be comparatively efficient, Quintile 4 funds were required to reduce total expenses by 75 per cent (−0.754) and volatility of return by 80 per cent (−0.801). Similarly, Quintile 5 funds needed to reduce total expenses by, on average, 83 per cent (−0.824) and volatility of return by 89 per cent (−0.894).

Research limitations/implications

As in other empirical research, this study also depended heavily on the data collected from the secondary sources such as APRA database and other financial reports. The issues of measurement errors in data sources such as APRA database are well documented (see, e.g. Cummins, 2012). This issue needs the attention of future research on the efficiency of superannuation funds.

Practical implications

The findings on individual year DEA estimates indicate that most funds were inefficient due to high expenses. Therefore, mandatory disclosure of fees and charges in a comparable manner may be necessary to justify fee payments and to address transparency and accountability issues, which are critical issues identified by the Cooper Review and the academic literature (Australian Government, 2014; Cooper et al., 2010; Gallery and Gallery, 2006).

Social implications

The issue of Australian superannuation funds concentrating the majority of fund assets in highly volatile investment vehicles such as the share markets has been in the spotlight in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. There have been proposals to better diversify superannuation assets in other asset classes (Cooper et al., 2010).

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current literature on superannuation funds by investigating efficiency. As efficiency studies using DEA have not been conducted on the Australian superannuation industry, this study also contributes to the academic literature on DEA and its extensive applications to various economic sectors. Efficiency scores using DEA, ranking, trends and shifts in the efficiency frontiers could be obtained for Australian superannuation funds on an on-going or annual basis.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Abdullahi D. Ahmed and Abu N.M. Wahid

This paper aims to use the newly developed panel data cointegration analysis and the dynamic time series modeling approach to examine the linkages between financial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the newly developed panel data cointegration analysis and the dynamic time series modeling approach to examine the linkages between financial structure (market‐based vs bank‐based) and economic growth in African economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research investigates the dynamic relationship between financial structure and economic growth in a panel of a group of seven African developing countries over the period of 1986‐2007. The paper uses various indicators/measures of financial structure and financial system, and employs the traditional time‐series analysis for causality as well as the newly developed panel unit root and cointegration techniques and estimated finance‐growth relationship using FMOLS for heterogeneous panel.

Findings

From the dynamic heterogeneous panel approach, the paper firstly finds that market‐based financial system is important for explaining output growth through enhancing efficiency and productivity. Second, the authors' empirical evidence supports the view that higher levels of banking system development are positively associated with capital accumulation growth and lead to faster rates of economic growth.

Originality/value

Panel cointegration, group mean panel FMOLS and country‐by‐country time series investigations indicate that the market‐based financial system is important for explaining output growth through enhancing efficiency and productivity, whereas the development of banking system is significantly associated with capital accumulation growth. Further results from the time‐series approach show evidence of unidirectional causality running from market‐oriented as well as bank‐oriented financial systems to economic growth.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Abdullahi D. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to use the recent development in unit root tests and cointegration as applied to panel data and dynamic time series, to estimate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the recent development in unit root tests and cointegration as applied to panel data and dynamic time series, to estimate the relationship between financial liberalization, financial development and growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper assesses the dynamics of the relationship between financial development, financial liberalization and growth using the latest dynamic panel data framework and time series analyses comprising up to 15 Sub‐Saharan African countries with annual observations over the period of 1976‐2005. The research uses various measures of, or proxies for, financial intermediary development, including ratio of private sector credit and share of domestic credit to income.

Findings

The results obtained from a heterogenous panel investigation and time series methodology such as Granger causality, indicate a long‐run equilibrium relationship between financial development and economic growth. This is consistent with the view that financial development can act as an “engine of growth” and plays a crucial role in the process of economic development. However, there is little evidence to support the hypothesis that financial liberalization directly “leads” growth.

Originality/value

Group mean panel fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) and country‐by‐country time series investigations show evidence of causality running from financial development to growth. The analysis yielded limited evidence of financial liberalization Granger‐causing economic growth. However, this is not to say that financial liberalization does not promote growth, as it could do so indirectly through fostering financial development.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Enjiang Cheng and Abdullahi D. Ahmed

The purpose of this study is to examine the demand for credit and credit rationing conducted by formal, informal and emerging microfinance lenders in the four poor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the demand for credit and credit rationing conducted by formal, informal and emerging microfinance lenders in the four poor counties of China.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper extends the existing studies on credit rationing in rural China by comparing the determinants of credit rationing by three different lenders, the formal lenders rural credit cooperatives (RCCs), the informal lenders and the new microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Findings

MFIs are capable of reaching out to the even poorer households if they develop the loan products based on the income and expenditure flows of these households.

Research limitations/implications

The determinants of credit rationing by three types of institutions are estimated separately.

Practical implications

RCCs in China shall change their policy of discrimination against female-headed households. RCCs shall also simplify the loan application procedures and assess the clients based on their repayment capacities rather than the age or assets alone. RCCs could learn from MFIs to use incomes from migrant workers as a criterion to assess the loan applicants.

Social implications

gender equity for loan access.

Originality/value

This paper extends the existing studies on credit rationing in rural China by comparing the determinants of credit rationing by three different lenders, the formal lenders (RCCs), the informal lenders and the new MFIs.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Ahmed Zakaria Abdullahi, Ebenezer Bugri Anarfo and Hod Anyigba

The study investigates the effect of autocratic, democratic and transformational leadership styles on employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the effect of autocratic, democratic and transformational leadership styles on employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The study further examines the moderating role of leaders' emotional intelligence between leadership styles and OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to collect data from 618 small and medium-sized enterprises' (SMEs) employees in Ghana. For this study, both simple random and convenient sampling were adopted in selecting respondents. Regression was used to test the hypotheses in the research model using IBM–Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Findings

The results show that democratic and transformational leadership styles both positively predicted the OCB of SME employees, although transformational leadership has a more significant influence. On the contrary, autocratic leadership style was found to have an insignificant relationship with OCB of SME employees when the interactive effect of the various leadership styles and emotional intelligence were introduced into the model. The results also show that whereas leaders' emotional intelligence positively moderate the relationship between autocratic leadership style and OCB, the relationships between democratic leadership style and OCB and between transformational leadership style and OCB are not significantly moderated by leaders' emotional intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

An examination of other prominent leadership styles (for example, the transactional leadership style and the laissez faire leadership style) could be key areas for future research as it is a potential limitation of this study. Similarly, the use of a Western leadership instrument could also be a potential limitation in the Ghanaian context, although these instruments and scales may be applicable. Future studies could also consider a longitudinal approach to give a more holistic picture of the effect of the leadership styles on OCB.

Practical implications

In general, the findings of the study support the idea that the autocratic leadership style affects SME employees' OCB both directly and indirectly through leaders' emotional intelligence. This study recommends that leaders of SMEs should focus on leadership styles that combine both result-oriented and people-centric behaviors to encourage SMEs' employees to engage in OCB.

Originality/value

This study provides firsthand information on the impact of autocratic leadership style, democratic leadership style and transformational leadership style on an employee's OCB from the Ghanaian SME perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Muhanad Ahmed Ali, Farah Ahmad and Marina Morrow

While there is literature that examines factors associated with low participation in cancer screening among Canadian ethnic groups, there is limited understanding of black…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is literature that examines factors associated with low participation in cancer screening among Canadian ethnic groups, there is limited understanding of black visible minorities, particularly Somalis. Thus, the purpose of this study is to synthesize knowledge pertaining to the perceptions, beliefs and barriers of Somali women and men toward screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers in countries such as Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The scoping review methodology was used to search for peer-reviewed articles that explicitly examined perceptions, beliefs and barriers among Somalis toward screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers in developed countries. The following electronic databases were searched without time frame restrictions, namely, OVID Medline, Embase, CINHAL, PubMed, Scopes and ProQuest. A total of 402 peer-reviewed articles were identified and screened. Three articles were identified through reference list screening (one eligible) and consultation with experts in the networks (two eligible). In total, 12 studies met the inclusion criteria for synthesis. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the selected articles for key themes and the synthesis was informed by the socio-ecological model.

Findings

The majority of studies originated from the USA and focused primarily on Somali women and cervical cancer screening. Themes that emerged from the literature include individual-level negative experiences and socio-cultural perceptions/beliefs; community-level barriers in cancer screening; and systemic challenges in navigating the health-care system. Many of the studies focused on individual and community-level determinants of cancer screening, with little attention to systemic level determinants. Other gaps identified include factors influencing Somali men’s low participation in cancer screening; limited studies on colorectal cancer and Somali women; and specific cancer-screening barriers faced by Somalis within the Canadian context.

Originality/value

The findings of the review reveal multiple cancer screening challenges for Somali communities and the gained insights should inform both health and social care practitioners and policymakers.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Shafiu Ibrahim Abdullahi

This paper explores the role of Zakah in social cause marketing. Academic literature on Islamic economics, finance and management mostly deals with the links that exists…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the role of Zakah in social cause marketing. Academic literature on Islamic economics, finance and management mostly deals with the links that exists between Zakah and consumption, neglecting important and strategic links with social cause marketing. This paper emanated from need to outline social cause and the charitable role of Zakah in promoting Halal businesses, poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Most works in the field of Zakah did not foresee the role of marketing. This is a misjudgement, as this work showed that Zakah yields large and measurable social gains to help the society and a firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary sources were used in writing this paper. Available literature in the form of journals, books, manuals and reports was referred to. As a conceptual work, the paper does not test hypothesis or pretends to provide empirical evidences. It uses mathematical economics in arriving at some of the conclusions. Findings were derived through deductions and critical discourses, not through crunching of primary data.

Findings

The paper shows how Zakah, Halal consumption and corporate social responsibility are connected and highlights the role of Zakah as a social marketing tool. It shows how Zakah affects consumption through marginal propensity of Zakah recipients who spend Zakah money on basic needs.

Research limitations/implications

The paper looks at the broad aspects of Zakah and social marketing. How to make Zakah a pillar of Islamic firms’ social cause programs shall be the focus of future academic works in this area.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in drawing attention of Islamic firms to the effectiveness of Zakah in building a corporate image. It draws the attention of firms, activists, academics and governments to functions of Zakah that have not been studied in depth.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Shafiu I. Abdullah

A decade after 2008 crisis, scholars in mainstream field of finance are yet to proffer lasting solutions to the menace that target the root cause of the crisis. Islamic…

Abstract

A decade after 2008 crisis, scholars in mainstream field of finance are yet to proffer lasting solutions to the menace that target the root cause of the crisis. Islamic finance offers a simple message for the whole episode and others similar to it: introduction of God consciousness, removal of interest from the system, and its replacement with profit and loss sharing together with establishment of an ethic base corporate governance structure. Absence of ethical considerations is the main factor for financial crisis in the past hundred years. Models utilized by Islamic finance industry for financing and sharing of risk are musharakah and mudarabah. This chapter provides an overview of risk management and governance in both Islamic and conventional finance in the process outlining similarities and differences between the systems. It dissected through developments in the two fields and highlighted recent controversial topics affecting the field of finance in the modern world.

Details

Research in Corporate and Shari’ah Governance in the Muslim World: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-007-4

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Abdullahi Ahmed Umar, Noor Amila Wan Abdullah Zawawi and Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz

The purpose of this study is to explore the skills required by regulatory agencies for effective governance of public-private partnership (PPP) contracts from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the skills required by regulatory agencies for effective governance of public-private partnership (PPP) contracts from the perspective of Malaysian regulators. There is a growing literature indicating that there is poor public sector expertise in managing PPP projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, being an exploratory one, relied on a questionnaire survey of the Malaysian PPP unit (UKAS) and five Malaysian regulatory agencies responsible for regulating service delivery across a number of sectors.

Findings

The results of the exploratory factor analysis returned six factor groupings, indicating that the most important skills are procurement, auditing and forensic accounting, lifecycle costing, sector-specific, negotiation analysis and performance management. It was also found that academic qualifications, profession, years of experience and the regulatory agency had no mediating effect on the rankings.

Practical implications

The findings show that infrastructure regulation training programs should be tailored to reflect regional and country-specific characteristics. This is because a similar study with a globalised set of respondents gave a different result from the current study.

Originality/value

There is a growing trend towards remunicipalisations and contract cancellations globally. This is the very outcome that regulatory agencies were created to prevent. Studies including government reports are increasingly pointing in the direction of poor skills set among public sector staff managing PPPs. This lack of capacity has resulted in poor oversight, which now threatens the sustainability of service provision.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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