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Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Virginia Bodolica and Martin Spraggon

Reflect on the influence of different lifecycle stages on the strategy of a family business; evaluate the impact of family, industry and company dynamics on the evolution…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Reflect on the influence of different lifecycle stages on the strategy of a family business; evaluate the impact of family, industry and company dynamics on the evolution of a family firm; assess the impact of ownership, governance and succession considerations on the sustainability of a family firm; and develop decision-making skills to overcome specific dilemmas and secure the family business longevity.

Case overview/synopsis

Five industries, three generations and one family business. What started off as an entrepreneur’s ambition, Almajid Limited has proven itself to a sustainable source of revenue and a diverse portfolio of businesses for multiple generations of a Saudi Arabian family. This case study offers an exclusive opportunity to follow the tumultuous journey of a Saudi family business and analyze the different phases of its evolution over seven decades and three generations. In particular, the case aims to highlight the complexities surrounding the management of a family firm and illustrate how various lifecycle stages stemming from a number of areas (e.g. family, company, industry, ownership and governance) simultaneously influence the family business strategy. Being deeply embedded in the context of Saudi Arabia, the case unveils the unique challenges of managing a family business in a conservative cultural setting. The case study is divided into four parts, with each of them putting the emphasis on a different lifecycle area of significance for the evolution of the family business. Each part culminates with the identification of an area-relevant dilemma that needs to be addressed for the family firm to be able to move into the next stage of its development. Part A focuses on the family area or axis, the Part B on the industry axis, Part C on the company axis, while Part D is based on the sustainability axis, which embraces as many as three dilemmas in relation to the ownership, governance and succession in the family firm. Moreover, each part incorporates a timeline of critical events that contributed to the emergence of a specific dilemma and a culturally-rooted anime that helps the readers visualize the story, picture somebody else’s reality, and empathize with the key protagonists of the case to achieve optimal decision-making.

Complexity academic level

Graduate audience: Master of Business Administration or Master of Global Entrepreneurial Management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 22 May 2020

A new power-sharing deal in Afghanistan.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB252783

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Case study
Publication date: 23 October 2015

Ned Smith and Andrea Meyer

This case gives students the opportunity to explore the concept of organizational status as a competitive asset. CEO Noura Abdullah of Saudi furniture retailer Aura…

Abstract

This case gives students the opportunity to explore the concept of organizational status as a competitive asset. CEO Noura Abdullah of Saudi furniture retailer Aura founded her company as a middle-market furniture and home goods store offering affordable yet design-savvy products. By many accounts, both tangible and intangible, Aura had been a success. By late 2014, Aura had drawn considerable attention from several high-status Saudi wedding planners and media outlets, including Harper's Bazaar Interiors, Elle Decor, and Martha Stewart Weddings. This attention yielded unusually strong conversion rates (the percentage of visitors to the store who made a purchase). Foot traffic, on the other hand, remained unexpectedly low, leading Abdullah to wonder whether the high-status affiliations had unintentionally signaled to mid-market consumers that they would not be able to afford Aura's products, keeping such customers away. Students will decide, along with Abdullah, how to handle this unique “problem” as Aura enters a growth phase to other Saudi and Middle Eastern markets.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Siti Khomsatun, Hilda Rossieta, Fitriany Fitriany and Mustafa Edwin Nasution

The unique characteristic of Islamic bank leads in governance and disclosure. Using stakeholder, signaling, and market discipline theory, governance and adequate…

Abstract

The unique characteristic of Islamic bank leads in governance and disclosure. Using stakeholder, signaling, and market discipline theory, governance and adequate disclosure may increase bank soundness. This study aims to investigate the relationship of sharia disclosure and Sharia Supervisory Board in influencing Islamic bank soundness in the different regulatory framework of the country. Using purposive sampling, the research covered 84 Islamic banks in 16 countries during the period 2013–2015 with lag data of Islamic bank soundness. The result shows sharia disclosure influences on Islamic bank soundness for management efficiency, capital adequacy ratio, asset quality, and liquidity. The results also show that sharia disclosure mediates the indirect effect of SSB on Islamic bank soundness. The regulatory framework (sharia accounting standard and SSB regulation) shows moderating effect of regulation framework proved on the association of sharia disclosure with management efficiency, capital, and liquidity. The effect is indirectly depending on the regulatory framework for proxy management efficiency, capital, and liquidity. The implication of the research suggests that sharia disclosure could increase the market discipline mechanism of Islamic bank stream. The Islamic bank can increase the transparency using sharia disclosure as a branding for increasing public trust, even though in the deficient Islamic bank regulation countries.

Details

Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 18 September 2020

The Taliban agreed to talk to Kabul's delegation only reluctantly, under US pressure. The Kabul authorities were scarcely any keener. The insurgents' negotiating strategy…

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Mohammad Abdullah

This paper aims to analyse the Sharīʿah premises of waqf (Islamic endowment), followed by dilating on the nature of argumentation among the classical jurists on its rules…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the Sharīʿah premises of waqf (Islamic endowment), followed by dilating on the nature of argumentation among the classical jurists on its rules and principles. The paper critically analyses the edifice of the applied juristic analogy of different early jurists in deriving various waqf doctrines. The objective of analysing the jurisprudential framework of waqf in its classical mould is to conceptualise the methods, mechanism and nature of juristic analogies in deriving the waqf principles. This analysis is critical to understand the scope of jurisprudential flexibility in modern awqāf.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an outcome of a library-based research. It uses the classical jurisprudential treatises of waqf with an aim to analyse the Sharīʿah basis of the institution, the premises of its key principles and the applied juristic analogy to derive the same. The paper covers the classical waqf books and treatises from the four Sunni schools of jurisprudence and uses a textual analysis method.

Findings

The paper finds that in its initial phase, the conceptual framework of waqf was not unanimously agreed by all jurists, rather its Sharīʿah permissibility remained critically disputed among them for a while. Though, the opinion of those jurists who approved the Sharīʿah-validity of waqf was to prevail in the later stage, disagreement persisted with reference to its necessary features and defining criteria. It is found that in the classical waqf literature, two most disputed aspects of waqf jurisprudence constituted the requirements for completion of a waqf and its ownership status.

Research limitations/implications

This study neither covers the historical contribution of waqf among the Muslim societies nor touches on the empirical aspects of modern waqf. Rather, the focus of the study is limited to analysing the classical jurisprudential discourse of waqf and distillation process of its rulings.

Practical implications

The objective of analysing the classical juristic discourse of waqf is to underline the premises of classical juristic analogy in determining the framework of fiqh al-awqāf (jurisprudence of waqf) in its classical permutations and to learn how to adopt a similar approach for deduction of new waqf rulings.

Originality/value

This paper adds original value to the body of waqf literature for analysing the classical waqf rulings distillation process along with examining the methods and mechanism of juristic analogy.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 November 2019

The territory was returned to Jordan the previous day, ending a 25-year arrangement agreed when the countries signed a 1994 peace treaty. The king declared that Jordan was…

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Shamsul Nahar Abdullah and Ku Nor Izah Ku Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the representation of women on the boards (WOMBDs) and audit committees is associated with a reduction in the practice of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the representation of women on the boards (WOMBDs) and audit committees is associated with a reduction in the practice of earnings management and whether women are associated with income reducing (conservative) rather than income-increasing (aggressive) earnings management. The authors further argue that family ownership moderates the relationship between the presence of WOMBDs and audit committees and earnings management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses non-finance firms listed on Bursa Malaysia over a period of four years, i.e. from 2008 until 2011.

Findings

The evidence reveals that the presence of WOMBD or audit committee is not associated with a propensity for earnings management. In addition, the evidence also reveals that family ownership does not interact either with WOMBD or with women on the audit committee (WOMAC) to influence the propensity for earnings management. Nevertheless, the additional analyses show that, while women on boards are not associated with income-decreasing accruals, the presence of women on audit committees leads to income-reducing earnings management. The evidence further reveals that family ownership does not interact with either WOMBD or WOMAC to influence income-decreasing earnings management.

Originality/value

This study extends prior research on the role of women directors and women audit committee members on earnings management focussing on family ownership. Further, the study also examines the direction of earnings management as opposed to the most prior studies, which mainly focus on the propensity of earnings management.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Azhar Abdul Rahman and Mohd Diah Hamdan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Malaysian companies’ compliance with mandatory accounting standards. Specifically, this study examines the efficacy of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Malaysian companies’ compliance with mandatory accounting standards. Specifically, this study examines the efficacy of agency-related mechanisms on the degree of compliance with Financial Reporting Standards (FRS) 101, Presentation of Financial Statements. It so proceeds by focussing on corporate governance parameters (board characteristics and ownership structure) and other firm characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data drawn from a sample of 105 Malaysian companies listed on the ACE market in 2009, the authors employ multiple regression analysis models to establish whether selected corporate governance and company-specific characteristics (proxying for agency-related mechanisms) are related to the degree of disclosure compliance.

Findings

The results indicate that the overall disclosure compliance is high (92.5 per cent). Furthermore, only firm size is positively associated with the degree of compliance. The other variables, those consisting of board independence, audit committee independence, CEO duality, the extent of outside blockholders’ ownership and leverage, do not show any significant relationship with the degree of compliance.

Research limitations/implications

This study focusses on only one accounting standard (FRS 101) that is mandatory in Malaysia. FRS 101 is both structured and rigid, leaving no room for companies to conceal any particular information. The sample of Malaysian companies selected is restricted to those listed only on the ACE market. As such, the results cannot be generalised to every company in Malaysia.

Practical implications

These results have important implications for policy makers because they suggest that whilst agency-related mechanisms may motivate compliance with mandatory standards, full compliance may be unattainable without regulations.

Originality/value

This is the only study in Malaysia to investigate the impact of regulatory requirements on corporate compliance level by companies listed on the new ACE market, which was introduced by the Bursa Malaysia in August 2009. This study contributes to the literature by examining the effects of both company-specific characteristics (such as company size, company age, liquidity, etc.) and corporate governance parameters on the degree of corporate compliance with mandatory disclosure, simultaneously, in contrast with prior studies which have examined them in isolation.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2018

Adnan Aldholay, Osama Isaac, Zaini Abdullah, Rasheed Abdulsalam and Ahmed Hamoud Al-Shibami

While many researchers have investigated the adoption and usage of online learning in different settings, one area that has yet to be examined thoroughly, particularly in…

Abstract

Purpose

While many researchers have investigated the adoption and usage of online learning in different settings, one area that has yet to be examined thoroughly, particularly in the context of online learning in Yemen, is the self-efficacy role. The purpose of this paper is to extend the Delone and McLean information system success model by incorporating a self-efficacy construct as an antecedent to user satisfaction and actual usage to predict student performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey method was used to collect primary data from 448 students in nine public universities in Yemen. The six constructs in the proposed model were measured using existing scales. The data analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling via AMOS.

Findings

Three main results were revealed, namely that overall quality (system, information and service quality) and self-efficacy have a positive impact on user satisfaction and actual usage; that actual usage significantly predicts user satisfaction; and that both user satisfaction and actual usage have a positive impact on student performance.

Research limitations/implications

First as the study population were students from nine public universities, it excluded academics and administrative staff. Second, the study depends on self-reported measures to test the proposed research model. This is because getting objective data about the performance was not probable due to the issue of privacy.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can be a guideline for Yemeni higher education institutions to develop efficient and effective plans to improve the performance of education institutions, and train and develop student ability to use online learning. Additionally, it highlights the areas that university management needs to concentrate on, namely information systems (IS) tools that will contribute to higher student enrolment, address the lack of infrastructure and improve the quality of education outcomes, things which represent Yemen’s main challenges in the higher education sector.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing literature of IS by combining overall quality, self-efficacy, actual usage and user satisfaction to predict performance impact of online learning among students in nine public universities in Yemen. Furthermore, the predictive power of the proposed model has a higher ability to explain and predict performance impact compared to those obtained from some of the previous studies.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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