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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Mohammed Saleh Alosani, Hassan Saleh Al-Dhaafri and Abdulla Awadh Abdulla

Government agencies are trying to develop strategies to improve their innovative activities. However, due to many challenges and obstacles, employees are reluctant to…

Abstract

Purpose

Government agencies are trying to develop strategies to improve their innovative activities. However, due to many challenges and obstacles, employees are reluctant to perform innovatively in such agencies. Human resource management (HRM) practises and an appropriate culture can help to improve service innovation. However, empirical evidence to prove this relationship is insufficient particularly in the government sector. Thus, this study aims to empirically analyses the effect of HRM practises and innovation culture on service innovation of the United Arab Emirates (UAE)’s Government agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from government entities in the UAE. Structural equation modelling through partial least squares modelling was used to test the proposed hypotheses. SPSS was also used to conduct preliminary analysis.

Findings

Statistical results provide strong evidence that HRM practises and innovation culture positively affected service innovation of UAE’s Government agencies.

Research limitations/implications

Further details and valuable implications are discussed throughout the study. Results have many practical and theoretical implications. Results can help government agencies develop their services innovation by tailoring HRM practises and establishing proper innovation culture in their agencies.

Originality/value

Although several contributions indicated that culture is a key determinant of innovation and a mediator in the link between HRM practises and service innovation, the literature lacks empirical studies investigating this link. Accordingly, this study seeks to bridge this gap and delivers evidence supporting them. In addition, this study is one of the unique studies that use these variables in government agencies in the UAE.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Afnan Mahmood Freije and Maysoon Nedham Awadh

The purpose of this paper is to determine the fatty acid composition of the edible snail Turbo coronatus from the Bahrain sea.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the fatty acid composition of the edible snail Turbo coronatus from the Bahrain sea.

Design/methodology/approach

Total lipid content was extracted and methyl esters of fatty acids (FAMEs) were prepared and analyzed by gas chromatography.

Findings

Gas‐liquid chromatography shows that saturated fatty acids (SFA) are the major forms of fatty acids, followed by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). The most abundant PUFA are linolenic acid (18:3n‐3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5n‐3), linoleic acid (18:2n‐6), and arachidonic acid (ARA 20:4n‐6), the MUFA 16:1 (n‐7), and the SFA 16:0, 14:0, 18:0 and 20:0. The sum of EPA and DHA is 8.04 per cent. The n‐3/n‐6 fatty acids ratio approximately (2:1) is within the range of marine molluscs. The principle differences in the fatty acid composition of Turbo coronatus than most marine molluscs is their low DHA (0.23±0.01 per cent), low PUFA (40.92 per cent), and high SFA contents (49.25 per cent). The principle differences in the fatty acid composition of Turbo coronatus from most marine molluscs is their low DHA (0.23±0.01 per cent), low PUFA (40.92 per cent), and high SFA contents (49.25 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

The Turbo coronatus samples were collected from Shaikh Ebrahim Island; however, further studies regarding the fatty acid composition of Turbo coronatus from other locations are required.

Practical implications

The results suggest that Turbo coronatus feeds on bacteria‐enriched detritic matter as well as phytoplankton and algae. The low concentration of PUFA in relation to SFA in Turbo coronatus can be attributed to warm water, high salinity, and food availability.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable information about the fatty acid contents in Turbo coronatus, and its feeding habits, and nutritional values.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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