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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

AbdulRashid AbdulAziz

Ever since hydrocarbon resources were exploited off the coast of Terengganu in 1978, a state in Peninsular Malaysia, its built environment underwent dramatic physical…

Abstract

Ever since hydrocarbon resources were exploited off the coast of Terengganu in 1978, a state in Peninsular Malaysia, its built environment underwent dramatic physical transformation arising from huge investments in first‐grade infrastructure and industrial facilities, largely hydrocarbon‐related in nature. Yet, more than two decades later, the stock and technical competencies of the local contractors have not been to the level one might expect, despite prolonged robust demand that should have acted as an alluring incentive for entrepreneurship. There were, of course, enabling factors such as favorable client and government interventions. However, the inhibitors ‐ economic model, socio‐cultural traits, institution, mix of construction demand and even the recent change in political landscape ‐ were found to exert an even greater influence. The findings of this study underscore the necessity of identifying the influential forces exerting on the construction community's operating environment before any construction entrepreneurial development programme is instituted so that realistic targets can be set. Furthermore, as different regions may possess different types and intensities of such forces, implementing standard policy prescription is likely to yield sub‐national diversity

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Andrew Ebekozien, Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz and Mastura Jaafar

Malaysia's open registration system (ORS) scheme, which began in 1997, was established as part of prevention mechanism by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government to…

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysia's open registration system (ORS) scheme, which began in 1997, was established as part of prevention mechanism by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government to plug the leakage in the low-cost housing (LCH) allocation process. After two decades, ineligible persons still secure LCH to the detriment of the Malaysian low-income earners (LIEs) house-buyers/rentals. This paper explored the LCH computerised ORS for LIEs and proffered policy solutions to improve the scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected via unexplored exploratory sequential mixed methods approach that engaged 25 well-informed participants and the ‘quantilised findings’, validated by the Malaysian LCH policymakers.

Findings

This paper found that there is weak compliance to computerised ORS, which is pronounced in states with relaxed eligibility clearance. Also, it was found that under-declaration of income evident in states where there is relaxed verification and lack of data sharing between states and with federal governments, among others, are the root cause of weak compliance to computerised ORS.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to unravelling the encumbrances in the low-cost housing computerised open registration system in Malaysia's major cities. Future research is needed to use relevant information to access the level of enforcement of the computerised open registration system across the states of Malaysia.

Practical implications

This paper recommended that LCH computerised ORS should be devoid of party favouritism, state government should establish functional LCH computerised ORS, and the state and federal governments, should embrace cooperative federalism. Also, applicants should be subjected to the Central Credit Reference Information System check, and culprits should be referred to the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission. This paper provides salutary lessons on how to improve the scheme with a view to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals regarding housing in 2030.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the low-cost housing computerised open registration system in Malaysia is yet to be implemented across the states.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz, Ho Shiew Yi and Mastura Jaafar

The resource‐based view (RBV) has been used on various industry studies. To examine the resources required to thrive in the private housing development sector in Malaysia…

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Abstract

The resource‐based view (RBV) has been used on various industry studies. To examine the resources required to thrive in the private housing development sector in Malaysia, the RBV was similarly utilised. Using a combination of mailed questionnaires and face‐to‐face interviews, the study identified and ranked fourteen resources by virtue of their ability to exploit opportunities and/or neutralise threats, or in short, value. While the ranking of some of the resources echoe similar past industry studies, others interestingly did not, perhaps due to the unique characteristics of the industry, or even country. New players to the industry can take stock of the findings to maximise their chances of success. The paper ends by recommending that the study be repeated in Malaysia, this time with many more respondent, to confirm the findings. It also proposes that similar studies be conducted in other countries to enable cross‐country comparisons to be made.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Sasmoko, Muhammad Saeed Lodhi, Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz, Nur Fatihah Abdullah Bandar, Rahimah Embong, Mohd Khata Jabor, Siti Nisrin Mohd Anis and Khalid Zaman

The study aims to analyze the role of coronavirus testing capacity to possibly reduce the case fatality ratio (CFR) in a large cross-section of countries. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to analyze the role of coronavirus testing capacity to possibly reduce the case fatality ratio (CFR) in a large cross-section of countries. The study controlled health-care expenditures, logistics performance index (LPI), carbon damages, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) to understand the nature of causation between the CFR and stated factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional regression apparatus for coefficient estimates and variance decomposition analysis (VDA) for forecasting relationships between the variables over time.

Findings

The results confirmed the W-shaped relationship between CFR and case-to-test ratio (CTR) in the presence of a LPI that exacerbates the CFR cases across countries. The VDA estimates suggest that carbon damages, logistics activities, and CSR are likely to influence CFR over time.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the study is believed to be the first study that assesses the W-shaped relationship between the CFR and CTR in the presence of dynamic variables, which helps to formulate long-term sustainable health-care policies worldwide.

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Andrew Ebekozien, Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz and Mastura Jaafar

Studies showed that policy influences housing provision. The review of these policies in the Southeast Asia's is possibly not yet adequate because of recent gap in housing…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies showed that policy influences housing provision. The review of these policies in the Southeast Asia's is possibly not yet adequate because of recent gap in housing demand-supply across the region. This review evaluates the state policy in low-cost housing (LCH) provision in Southeast Asian developing countries reported in published studies.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic search (ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) was conducted using the following search terms: “Low-Cost Housing policy in Southeast Asia.” Reference list of identified studies was scanned to identify more studies. Studies published between 1991 and 2020 that focused either on the region or country within the region were selected. An independent reviewer extracted data from the studies using a standardised form and 27 studies were included in this review.

Findings

LCH developing countries experience, encumbrances and measures to mitigate LCH demand-supply gap in Southeast Asia were the issues addressed from the reviewed. Findings from the studies indicate that the level of lax state policy and enforcement of LCH varies across nations.

Research limitations/implications

Findings and recommendations of this paper were based on systematically reviewed literature but does not compromise the robustness regarding state policy in low-cost housing provision in Southeast Asian developing countries. Thus, exploratory sequential mixed methods approach has been recommended as part of the implications for future research.

Practical implications

As part of the practical implications, this paper highlights the mechanism behind the success of Singapore LCH policy and transferability of the model to the developing countries within and outside the region, and open up the possibility to adopt these policies.

Originality/value

This study is probably the first systematic review on low-cost housing in Southeast Asia.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

ABDULRASHID ABDULAZIZ

Seymour's application of the eclectic paradigm to the international construction industry is examined. As with other theories on multinational enterprise, the paradigm was…

Abstract

Seymour's application of the eclectic paradigm to the international construction industry is examined. As with other theories on multinational enterprise, the paradigm was conceived by Dunning to explain the phenomenon of foreign direct investment in the manufacturing sector. In retaining it to explain international involvement of construction companies, certain conventional economic reasoning was modified. It is the contention of this paper that Seymour's conceptualization is incongruent with the peculiarities of international contracting. Neither does it reflect the extensive debate on the suitability of well‐grounded economic thoughts to international services. In the course of preparing this paper, it was found that a few government and international agencies have had to confront the difficulties of applying the existing theoretical framework to the services sector. Refinements are proposed here to make Seymour's theoretical construct more robust as a tool for future research, simply by referring to direct observations and materials which were at his disposal.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz and George Ofori

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with…

Abstract

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with the Institution of Architects Malaysia and the Institution of Engineers Malaysia working together in 2008 to come up with the Green Building Index (GBI) specifically suited for the Malaysian condition. The index was launched a year later, the same year that a new prime minister came into office. With greening the economy in mind, he launched a few major initiatives, one of which was the creation of the Ministry of Energy, Green Technology and Water to replace the Ministry of Energy, Water and Communications and another was the launching of the National Technology Policy. In December 2009, he made the commitment on Malaysia's behalf to reduce carbon dioxide emission at the Copenhagen Summit, thereby cementing his commitment to green issues at the international level. Behind-the-scene lobbying by the private sector resulted in the government explicitly endorsing the GBI by tying GBI certification of buildings to financial incentives. This paper makes the case that the strong cooperation between the private sector and the government over the GBI represents a form of public-private partnership on aspects of collaborative spirit, complementarity of resources, private sector leadership, wide-ranging ramifications over other partnerships across time, timing and sustainability. Other countries intending to come up with their own rating tool can take stock of the Malaysian experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

ABDULRASHID ABDULAZIZ and AMY CHWEE NGOH TAN

On 15 December 1993, the most ambitious trade liberalisation package in history was concluded, marking the end of multilateral trade negotiations under the aegis of the…

Abstract

On 15 December 1993, the most ambitious trade liberalisation package in history was concluded, marking the end of multilateral trade negotiations under the aegis of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Among the landmark achievements of that round was the addressing of the services sector for the first time in such a setting. This paper analyses the key provisions of the General Agreement of Trade in Services (GATS) in the context of the construction industry. Despite the fact that GATS is presently a framework which requires further negotiation, there are already certain matters that corporate strategists should be conversant with in preparation for the time when full trade surveillance is imposed on the industry. Specific reference is also made to the Government Procurement Agreement towards the end of this paper because of its galvanising force on future GATS negotiations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz, Subashini Suresh and Suresh Renukappa

The purpose of this study is to track the series of setbacks by a few like-minded persons since the early 1990s to entrench building surveying as a profession in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to track the series of setbacks by a few like-minded persons since the early 1990s to entrench building surveying as a profession in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were sourced from elite interviews with authoritative individuals who have been championing building surveying as a profession and supplemented by secondary sources.

Findings

Established professional bodies became hostile to what they perceived as attempts to encroach on their professional jurisdictions. There was even a move to subjugate building surveyors to the auxiliary role. The ultimate aim to obtain statutory “ring fence” around the proposed building surveying profession did not find favour with lawmakers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of small sample size was compensated by referral to past publications.

Practical implications

Latecomers face an uphill challenge in negotiating for legitimacy from established professions and lawmakers alike in a situation when no new work demand avails. Building surveyors in Malaysia have to either wait for external changes which would allow their traditional role to be formally recognised or take up new specialisations.

Originality/value

Additional empirical findings were uncovered to complement past studies. The main contribution lies in demonstrating the explanatory powers of the sociological lens for future studies on professions in the construction industry.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

AbdulRashid AbdulAziz

Japanese contractors have been successful in adopting total quality management (TQM) practices in their domestic operations. By examining Japanese contractors in a foreign…

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4220

Abstract

Japanese contractors have been successful in adopting total quality management (TQM) practices in their domestic operations. By examining Japanese contractors in a foreign country, the research presented in this paper shows that the implementation of TQM in the construction industry is constrained by national markets where the clients, subcontractors and site operatives are not imbued with the same quality culture. The location‐bound nature of the production process, competitive bidding which emphasises cost, dependence on subcontractors and the non‐direct link between the main contractors and site operatives are some of the constraining factors. Nonetheless, as demonstrated by the Japanese contractors, TQM routines can still be implemented, provided local norms and contracting practices are accommodated.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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