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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2024

Susminingsih Susminingsih, Abdul Mujib, Anis Wahdati, Mochammad Achwan Baharuddin and Dian Sa'adillah Maylawati

This study aims to examine the factors that influence the increase in purchase intention toward green batik products with religiosity as an intervening variable.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the factors that influence the increase in purchase intention toward green batik products with religiosity as an intervening variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey method that involved a sample size of 185 participants selected through purposive and accidental sampling techniques. The analysis was conducted by using IBM SPSS AMOS 21 software. The collected data were subjected to path analysis using multiple linear regression models.

Findings

The result indicated that religiosity plays a mediating role in the association between factors and the intention to purchase green product (GPd) of the Indonesian natural dye batik product. This finding is in accordance with the construction of theory of planned behavior in understanding consumer purchase intentions. GPd, green brand and green price exhibited a positive correlation with green purchase intention (GPI). Interestingly, the price was found to no longer serve as the primary factor in GPI.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis would have been more compelling if it had used a mixed-method approach by introducing the variables of customer satisfaction and promotion.

Practical implications

This research postulates that increased prices are no longer a deterrent to the purchase of GPd. Instead, consumer consciousness regarding GPd plays a pivotal role in driving GPI. GPd have revolutionized individuals’ consumption patterns to contribute to environmental preservation. The use of green batik products is seen as advantageous in helping mitigate environmental degradation.

Originality/value

The present research assesses the impact of religiosity, as an intervening variable, on the augmentation of GPI by gauging its significance in enhancing ecological consciousness and moral values.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk distributor…

Abstract

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk distributor because he failed to comply with a requirement that he should provide protective curtains to his milk floats, was a rare and in many ways, an interesting event. The Tribunal in this case was set up under reg. 16(2) (f), Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963, constituted in accordance with Part I, clause 2 (2), Schedule 4 of the Regulations. Part II outlines procedure for such tribunals. The Tribunal is similar to that authorized by S.30, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, which deals with the registration of dairymen, dairy farms and farmers, and the Milk and Dairies (General) Regulations, 1959. Part II, Schedule 2 of the Act provided for reference to a tribunal of appeals against refusal or cancellation of registration by the Ministry, but of producers only. A local authority's power to refuse to register or cancellation contained in Part I, Schedule 2 provided for no such reference and related to instances where “public health is or is likely to be endangered by any act or default” of such a person, who was given the right of appeal against refusal to register, etc., to a magistrates' court. No such limitation exists in respect of the revoking, suspending, refusal to renew a licence under the Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963; an appeal against same lies to the Minister, who must refer the matter to a tribunal, if the person so requests. This occurred in the case under discussion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 23 April 2024

Hajira Liaqat, Ishfaq Ahmed and Sheikh Usman Yousaf

This study aims to explore the phenomenon of Islamic religious communication and how Islamic banks in Pakistan use religion-based communication, along with its expected outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the phenomenon of Islamic religious communication and how Islamic banks in Pakistan use religion-based communication, along with its expected outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Transcendental phenomenology approach is opted using a multi-stage data collection strategy consisting of observations, documentary reviews and semi-structural interviews to get deep into the phenomenon in a particular context.

Findings

Findings highlight Islamic religious communication as workplace Islamic da’wah that is majorly categorized into compulsive da’wah, objectics da’wah and impulsive da’wah, serving its role in bringing spirituality to work through work-faith integration.

Research limitations/implications

The finding of the study can be used in planning, formulating and implementing Islamic da’wah-based model to induce spirituality at work.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its type exploring Islamic da’wah in an organizational context as a mean to bring spirituality at work.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Mohammad Nurunnabi

Due to scarcity of research in governance and accountability in private higher education in developing countries, the purpose of this paper is to explore the tensions surrounding…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to scarcity of research in governance and accountability in private higher education in developing countries, the purpose of this paper is to explore the tensions surrounding good governance in legitimizing accountability in private universities in developing countries with reference to Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods are employed: a quantitative survey of 1,576 students from all 79 private universities; qualitative interviews with 23 stakeholders; and policy documents including the Private University Acts, the World Bank Report and newspapers (1992-2015) were evaluated. The objectives of these mixed methods in this study are juxtaposed and generate complementary insights that together create a bigger picture surrounding governance and accountability issues.

Findings

Using Clark's (1983) triangle model (i.e. state control, academic oligarchy, and market forces together with the external influence of donors and boards of trustees as internal governance) and new institutional theory (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983), the major contributions of this study are explaining the root causes of the poor governance of private universities through three related factors: the substantial political power and autonomy held by boards of trustees; a lack of enforcement of Private University Act; and a lack of coordination among stakeholders. The coercive power of the state becomes powerless since the board of trustees ultimately enjoys political power and “does whatever it can.” The lack of coordination of the academic oligarchy (e.g. professors and academics) and market forces (represented by students) by the board of trustees creates a paradox of governance and hence a decoupling of formal policies and actual practice.

Practical implications

The findings have major policy implications for local and international policymakers for improving good governance in private universities in developing countries.

Originality/value

The novelty of the study's findings represents an initial effort to understand the complex and persistent phenomenon of prolonged poor governance of private universities in developing countries, which is largely neglected in the literature. This will undoubtedly contribute to literature and policy implications.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2024

Nurhafihz Noor

The continued relevance of technologies in halal industries requires managers to understand the factors contributing to such technologies’ acceptance. The technology acceptance…

Abstract

Purpose

The continued relevance of technologies in halal industries requires managers to understand the factors contributing to such technologies’ acceptance. The technology acceptance model (TAM) is dominant in the literature that predicts user acceptance and behaviour towards technology. Despite the model’s significance, there has yet to be a systematic review of studies featuring halal sectors that use TAM. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the existing literature on TAM in halal industries to understand the research trends as well as TAM modifications and research opportunities in halal industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis protocol, a framework-based review using the theories, contexts, characteristics and methods (TCCM) framework was conducted. The Scopus and Web of Science databases were used to retrieve English journal articles that investigated TAM in the context of halal markets. In total, 44 eligible articles were reviewed in terms of the developments and extensions of TAM in their studies across the halal industries.

Findings

The first study related to the use of TAM in the context of halal industries was published in 2014. The most prominent halal industry in the review, which used TAM, was Islamic finance. Indonesia was the leading economy in halal studies using TAM. Perceived usefulness was found to be a more significant factor than perceived ease of use for technology acceptance in TAM studies on halal industries. The significance of religiosity on TAM was inconsistent. Most research was done using quantitative surveys with consumers as the target sample.

Research limitations/implications

The studies in this review are based on the Scopus and Web of Science databases, which may be perceived as a study limitation. This study also only considered English journal articles and research in which the focus was on the use of TAM in halal industries rather than general industries with Muslim consumers.

Practical implications

Halal industries will continue to rely on technology for the provision of goods and services. With the rise of emerging technological innovations, this review will provide managers with an appreciation of technology acceptance across different contexts. Researchers can use the results of this review to guide future studies and contribute toward the development of this research area.

Originality/value

This review contributes to the Islamic marketing literature by being the first to comprehensively review the TAM model in the context of halal industries using the TCCM framework-based review approach. A research agenda is proposed to advance research on technology acceptance and TAM in halal industries.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2024

Sri Herianingrum, Sri Iswati, Anwar Ma’ruf and Zakaria Bahari

This study aims to examine the role of Islamic economic and social institutions during Covid-19 and try to propose a model that highlights Islamic economics and social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the role of Islamic economic and social institutions during Covid-19 and try to propose a model that highlights Islamic economics and social institutions’ role in providing community economic, social and health recovery support.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a qualitative approach with a multicase method. Interviews with the institutions including the Amil Zakat, Islamic Banks, Micro Waqf Banks and Islamic Cooperative (Baitul Maal wat Tamwil) were conducted in order to develop a model about how the integration between each institution in handling the effect of COVID-19.

Findings

The model shows the interaction roles of each Islamic institution and implementation in the long term and short term in handling the impact of Covid-19, particularly in the economic, social and health sectors. These institutions will assist the government in establishing community economic independence in the face of COVID-19, which has caused economic sluggishness or recession.

Research limitations/implications

This study proposes the model of synergy using a qualitative approach. Future studies can develop the synergy model by employing a statistical and quantitative method, such as by employing analytical network process method.

Originality/value

This study adds the literature about empirical evidence on the role of each Islamic economic and social institution and develops new scenario model about integration of those institutions in overcoming economic and social problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. These interactions play a role in shaping the community’s economic independence in dealing with the economic downturn due to COVID-19.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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