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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Omar Belkhodja and Abdelkader Daghfous

For family businesses, familiness constitutes a unique bundle of resources and capabilities resulting from family relationships and influences. The extant literature has…

Abstract

Purpose

For family businesses, familiness constitutes a unique bundle of resources and capabilities resulting from family relationships and influences. The extant literature has shown that familiness impacts organizational outcomes such as performance and innovation. This paper investigates the role of familiness in relation to absorptive capacity (ACAP). It also explores the specificities of nonfamily members’ social capital when different knowledge management (KM) approaches are adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory comparative case study design is adopted. Data from three family firms based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) provide the empirical setting for this study. The data were collected using semi-structured interviews, available documents, observations and company websites.

Findings

Our results reveal that the role of familiness in relation to ACAP varies according to the adopted KM approach. Familiness targets the potential ACAP when an explicit KM approach is adopted, the realized ACAP when a tacit KM approach is adopted, and both potential and realized ACAPs when a strategic KM approach is adopted. Our results also show that family firms invest in KM processes that support knowledge exploration and/or exploitation.

Originality/value

This paper provides further evidence for the role of familiness. It moves beyond the study of familiness from a resource-based view and adopts a knowledge-based perspective to develop a better understanding of the role of familiness in relation to ACAP. It also improves our understanding of nonfamily members’ social capital in family firms.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Abdelkader Daghfous, Abroon Qazi and M. Sajid Khan

The literature on supply chain risk management (SCRM) has investigated a multitude of supply chain risks. This paper aims to make a case for the importance of managing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on supply chain risk management (SCRM) has investigated a multitude of supply chain risks. This paper aims to make a case for the importance of managing the risk of knowledge loss in the supply chain management (SCM) function and incorporating knowledge loss as a critical risk within the SCRM process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a knowledge-based view of the SCRM process and attempts to bring to light insights based on a synthesis of the relevant literature. The authors conducted a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed articles published between 1998 and 2019. Further, a case study was conducted to illustrate the significance of the risk of knowledge loss in the SCM function in terms of how it operates and why it has such a significant impact on performance.

Findings

Knowledge loss is a relatively neglected type of supply chain risk that can be added to the existing typologies. This paper argues that knowledge loss in the SCM function has the propensity to significantly impact the performance of the focal firm, exacerbate other types of supply chain risk and impede risk mitigation efforts. We put forth several strategies that supply chain managers can adopt to mitigate the risk of knowledge loss in their function.

Research limitations/implications

This paper generates an exploratory opening that could pave the way for a systematic theory of knowledge loss as a supply chain risk and future empirical research. The study culminates in a number of important insights and initiatives for supply chain managers to recognize and manage the risk of knowledge loss.

Originality/value

This paper argues for the importance of incorporating the risk of knowledge loss in SCRM research and practice. It also provides an examination of some promising angles for future research in SCRM from a knowledge-based perspective.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Abdelkader Daghfous, Omar Belkhodja and Norita Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to advance information technology (IT) adoption research and practice by investigating the process of knowledge transfer (KT) undertaken by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance information technology (IT) adoption research and practice by investigating the process of knowledge transfer (KT) undertaken by suppliers of IT innovations. The authors expound the intricacies of formal and informal mechanisms of the KT initiative that aims at augmenting the absorptive capacity (ACAP) of potential IT adopters with the objective of increasing the likelihood of adoption of new IT products or services.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on case studies of ten IT suppliers to build on the limited research on KT for customers in IT adoption. The authors focus on the for customer type of KT from the standpoint of the IT supplier firm.

Findings

The authors’ results show that complexity of the IT product or service increases the reliance on formal and systematic KT initiatives. This paper also shows that there is a required minimum threshold level of initial customers’ ACAP in order for the KT initiative to be worthwhile for the supplier, especially for those offering complex IT products and services. However, IT suppliers were found to limit their reliance on KT when they believed that customers that became too knowledgeable might threaten the innovation’s diffusion.

Research limitations/implications

Since the authors’ case firms represented innovation suppliers, future studies should investigate customer-supplier dyads to explore and integrate the customer’s perspective in the analysis of the KT process. To this end, longitudinal studies would also provide immense insights into the KT process and how it evolves over time.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper consists of illuminating the workings of KT initiatives aimed at existing and potential customers from the standpoint of the IT innovation supplier. By focusing on the for customers aspect of KT, this paper advances the authors’ understanding of why and how IT suppliers should resort to formal vs informal KT mechanisms. The authors’ proposed framework also integrates and shows the roles of customers’ ACAP, complexity of the IT innovation, and tacitness of the knowledge transferred to the customers.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Norita Ahmad and Abdelkader Daghfous

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the business sector in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) based on their level of involvement in knowledge‐sharing activities with…

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3877

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the business sector in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) based on their level of involvement in knowledge‐sharing activities with external sources, internal organizational innovations, and the barriers and benefits of joining knowledge networks. Subsequently, the findings are used as a basis for proposing several recommendations on managing knowledge in the UAE businesses that could result in higher levels of motivation and productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory investigation is done by in‐depth interviews with the employees of five local and eight multinational companies in the UAE.

Findings

The paper finds that the concept of knowledge management (KM) is still not well received in this region. Most of the companies interviewed are concerned about confidentiality of their knowledge, and the presence of competent and trustworthy partners in such KM structures.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide a foundation for further research on inter‐organizational knowledge sharing in the UAE. However, this study has certain limitations such that its results may not be applicable to other industrial sectors not covered in this paper, or to other regions.

Originality/value

By using the case study approach with in‐depth interviews, this paper provides more reliable understanding of inter‐organizational KM in the UAE. It fills the gap of previous research on the subject.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Abdelkader Daghfous

Knowledge‐based competition has magnified the importance of learning alliances as a fast and effective mechanism of capability development. This case presents a technology…

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5478

Abstract

Knowledge‐based competition has magnified the importance of learning alliances as a fast and effective mechanism of capability development. This case presents a technology transfer project from a university's engineering research center to a private firm to illuminate learning and knowledge‐based determinants of the outcomes of such projects. In this paper, project success and effective knowledge transfer are used interchangeably to indicate a relatively high level of achievement of intended as well as the unintended benefits to the recipient firm. The main focus of this paper is on the contribution of prior related knowledge and the learning processes and activities, performed by the recipient firm, to such benefits. Based on the results of the case study, this paper draws several implications that differ from those prevailing in the literature on organizational learning and technology transfer, proposes ideas for future research, and makes practical recommendations for managers.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Abdelkader Daghfous and Norita Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the concept of user development which consists of proactively transferring knowledge to potential users of IT innovations in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the concept of user development which consists of proactively transferring knowledge to potential users of IT innovations in order to increase the likelihood of innovation adoption and diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach was adopted using three case organizations representing different sectors. These organizations represent the public, the semi-government, and the private sectors.

Findings

The findings show that proactive knowledge transfer builds the requisite absorptive capacity of users to understand, adopt new and complex systems and technologies, and effectively integrate them into their organizations, hence increasing their likelihood of adopting such innovations. The findings also show that effective user development hinges on proper selection of potential users and on goals alignment between the innovating firm and the selected users.

Research limitations/implications

The framework could be further refined through more diverse case studies from a broader range of companies. Survey-based investigations are also needed to operationalize the constructs and explore its effects on the performance of the innovating firm. In practice, innovation managers should be more proactive by recognizing the value of knowledge transfer when it comes to expanding and accelerating the adoption and diffusion of their innovations.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the importance of proactive knowledge transfer, especially in situation that call for absorptive capacity building. This paper also opens new opportunities for innovation managers to sell their innovations faster and to a wider market, and perhaps even altering the trajectory of particular innovations.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Abdelkader Daghfous, Nicholas Jeremy Ashill and Michel Roger Rod

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge transfer processes of knowledge intensive business service firms by focusing on the knowledge for customer, which is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge transfer processes of knowledge intensive business service firms by focusing on the knowledge for customer, which is the knowledge about the service provider's products and services, specifically “before‐sale” knowledge, and the transfer of this knowledge in order to develop customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an in‐depth qualitative study of the knowledge transfer process undertaken by a sample of six global knowledge intensive service firms, to use knowledge transfer as a means of customer development.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that customer absorptive capacity influences the role that knowledge for customers has in ultimately determining whether customer development will occur. Where tacit knowledge transfer occurs, it is restricted to loyal, high share customers. With respect to methods of transfer, the findings reveal that knowledge‐intensive business service firms transferring explicit knowledge utilise both formal and informal methods.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection was cross‐sectional and longitudinal research would have the benefit of examining how customer knowledge transfer changes over time during the customer development process (pre‐sale, during sale and post‐sale customer development). Future research studying other types of knowledge transfer, such as during‐sale and after‐sale knowledge transfer, are also encouraged.

Practical implications

Managers should be open to employing numerous types of media in transferring both explicit and tacit knowledge rather than restricting themselves to the normative “explicit‐formal‐media lean” versus “tacit‐informal‐media rich” categorisations in the literature.

Originality/value

Understanding the role of customer knowledge transfer in the development of existing organisational customers is particularly important in the context of knowledge intensive business service firms. The extant literature recognises that customer development efforts are critically important in increasing service adoption and firm performance but there exists a dearth of research on customer knowledge transfer in the context of professional service organisations.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Abdelkader Daghfous, Omar Belkhodja and Linda C. Angell

Research on knowledge loss is at an early stage of evolution. This paper seeks to extend the existent literature through an exploratory investigation of the drivers and

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5103

Abstract

Purpose

Research on knowledge loss is at an early stage of evolution. This paper seeks to extend the existent literature through an exploratory investigation of the drivers and impacts of knowledge loss, as well as associated retention strategies within manufacturing and service operations.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple research streams are used to explore and capture the complexities and intricacies of knowledge loss within four firms. The author follows a multiple case study approach with theoretical sampling of manufacturing and service firms.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that organizations should retain and diffuse architectural knowledge, improve strategic coordination among units, develop existing capabilities through different networking strategies and more effective networks, and transform these capabilities into effective organizational routines to mitigate knowledge loss and increase knowledge retention. Meanwhile, relying solely on standard operating procedures, information systems, and codification of knowledge in databases could undermine knowledge retention and lead to knowledge loss.

Practical implications

A comprehensive strategy to guide knowledge management efforts and actions should be adopted. Moreover, knowledge cannot be retained without the adoption of an integrative approach that comprises various strategies and without management commitment and drive.

Originality/value

The findings of this exploratory investigation add to the understanding of the knowledge loss phenomenon by showing that it is much more complex than was found in earlier studies emanating from various research streams. The paper proposes directions for future research.

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Abdelkader Daghfous, Norita Ahmad and Linda C. Angell

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology for conducting a knowledge‐enabled customer relationship management (KCRM) knowledge audit, which involves applying

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1365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology for conducting a knowledge‐enabled customer relationship management (KCRM) knowledge audit, which involves applying knowledge auditing principles to assess the existence and implementation level of KCRM processes within an organization. This type of audit enables an organization to thoroughly review the extent to which knowledge is generated, codified, distributed and utilized while the firm is identifying, differentiating between, interacting with, and customizing products and services for its customers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon the KM, CRM, and auditing literatures to develop a KCRM knowledge audit methodology. As an illustration, the proposed methodology for KCRM knowledge auditing was applied within the service arm of a paint manufacturing firm in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Findings

The proposed methodology allows supplier organizations to systematically evaluate the extent to which their CRM approaches are knowledge‐enabled; and to identify competitive strengths and opportunities in the areas such as cost, product and service quality, as well as flexibility to meet the changing requirements of their business customers.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on a practical point of view and, therefore, there are no testable propositions derived. In addition, the study focuses on an explicit KM model, which has limitations in tacit KM such as social networks and detail guidelines of KM outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper draws upon the KM, CRM, and auditing fields to develop a KCRM knowledge audit methodology. It contributes to the KM, CRM, and auditing literatures by developing and demonstrating how these literatures intersect via the concept and methodology of a KCRM knowledge audit.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

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1215

Abstract

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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