Search results

1 – 10 of 13
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Robert C. Moussetis, Ali Abu Rahma and George Nakos

This paper examined the relationships between national culture and strategic behavior in the banking industry in Jordan and U.S. The study first developed a strategic…

Abstract

This paper examined the relationships between national culture and strategic behavior in the banking industry in Jordan and U.S. The study first developed a strategic posture and secondly a cultural profile for the top management of the research domain. The strategic posture suggested the readiness for strategic response from managers. The degree of readiness was correlated with the constructed cultural profile of the managers and financial performance of the banks. The study found significant relationships between certain national cultural strategic characteristics, (risk propensity, time orientation, and openness to change, uncertainty avoidance and managerial perception of control over the environment) strategic behavior and financial performance.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Ahmad Tootoonchi, Paul Lyons and Abdalla Hagen

The purpose of this study is to investigate MBA students' attitudes about how teaching methodologies and instructor characteristics affect their learning. The data was…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate MBA students' attitudes about how teaching methodologies and instructor characteristics affect their learning. The data was collected from MBA students of a medium‐sized university in North Carolina. The results suggest that the participants overwhelmingly support the use of real world examples in class, followed by open classroom discussion, as the approaches that most positively influence their learning. The participants also reveal that instructors’ most important characteristics that may help their learning include the following in the order of importance: communication skills, knowledge of the subject matter, overall attitudes, fairness, and general personality.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Abdalla Hagen, Semere Haile and Ahmad Maghrabi

This study investigated the impact of the type of strategy on the type of environmental scanning activity of Egyptian CEOs at Egyptian banks. Results indicated that CEOs…

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of the type of strategy on the type of environmental scanning activity of Egyptian CEOs at Egyptian banks. Results indicated that CEOs with a cost‐leadership strategy were involved in environmental scanning activities that provide information concerning threats. Their counterparts with a differentiation strategy were involved in environmental scanning activities that provide information concerning opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Hagen F. Abdalla, Ahmed S. Maghrabi and Bel G. Raggad

This empirical study identifies, examines, and compares the perceptions of HRMs in selected organizations in one developed country (the USA) and one less‐developed country…

Abstract

This empirical study identifies, examines, and compares the perceptions of HRMs in selected organizations in one developed country (the USA) and one less‐developed country (Jordan) toward arguments supporting nepotism. It also identifies, examines, and compares the perceptions of these HRMs toward arguments against nepotism in these two countries. The results of this study indicate that few HRMs in each country have agreed with arguments supporting nepotism. In contrast, many of these HRMs have agreed with arguments against nepotism. While there are differences between the perceptions of US and Jordanian HRMs toward arguments for and against nepotism, these differences are not significant.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Farid Shirazi, Nawal Abdalla Adam, Mohana Shanmugam and Carsten D. Schultz

Social commerce has seen a prosperous growth following the rise of social media, in particular, social networking sites have established novel ways to communicate and…

Abstract

Purpose

Social commerce has seen a prosperous growth following the rise of social media, in particular, social networking sites have established novel ways to communicate and transact between firms and people. The rise of new technologies has also directed to changes in how entrepreneurs convey their business. Despite intensive social commerce research, the challenges of social commerce for entrepreneurs have attracted less attention and especially neglected the role of trust and satisfaction in electronic commerce.

Design/methodology/approach

This research use a survey to collect data. The authors use structural equation modeling-partial least square (SEM-PLS) to analysis the data. This quantitative research provides new insights in the food industry.

Findings

This research thus provides insights into social commerce by analyzing the role of trust in the relationship between customers' social media activities and customers' satisfaction. The present study finds a mediating effect of trust in developing satisfaction. Social media activities facilitate a positive level of trust that in turn creates a satisfying environment for customers in social commerce. The research provides theoretical and practical implications at the end of the study.

Originality/value

The findings provide good knowledge for the food industry to stay connected with customers and develop their satisfaction.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Mohamed Samir Abdalla Zahran

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyse the dynamic relationship between remittances inflows of Egyptians working abroad and asymmetric oil price shocks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyse the dynamic relationship between remittances inflows of Egyptians working abroad and asymmetric oil price shocks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a vector autoregressive (VAR) model to explain the impulse response functions (IRFs) and the forecast error variance decomposition (FEVD). The rationale behind using these tools is its ability to examine the dynamic effects of our variables of interest.

Findings

The impulse response functions confirmed that remittance inflows have various responses to asymmetric oil price shocks. For instance, inflowing remittances increase in response to positive oil price shocks, while it decreases in response to negative oil price shocks. Also, the results indicate that the responses are significant in the short and medium-run and insignificant in the long run. The magnitude of these responses reaches its peak or trough in the third year. Further, the variance decomposition reveals that oil price decreases are more influential than oil price increases.

Originality/value

This means that remittances inflows in Egypt are pro-cyclical with oil price shocks. That explained by the fact that more than one-half of those remittances sent from GCC countries where real economic growth is very pro-cyclical with the oil prices. This empirical assessment will help policymakers to determine the behaviour of remittances and highlights the impact of different kinds of oil prices shocks on remittances. Unlike the little existing literature, this study is the first study applied the VAR model using a novel dataset spanning 1960-2016.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

A.Allan Schmid

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was…

Abstract

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was Asher Hobson. Larzalere recalls the influence of Commons who retired in 1933. Upon graduation, Larzalere worked a short time for Wisconsin Governor Phillip Fox LaFollette who won passage of the nation’s first unemployment compensation act. Commons had earlier helped LaFollette’s father, Robert, to a number of institutional innovations.4 Larzalere continued the Commons’ tradition of contributing to the development of new institutions rather than being content to provide an efficiency apologia for existing private governance structures. He helped Michigan farmers form cooperatives. He taught land economics prior to Barlowe’s arrival in 1948, but primarily taught agricultural marketing. One of his Master’s degree students was Glenn Johnson (see below). Larzalere retired in 1977.

Details

Wisconsin "Government and Business" and the History of Heterodox Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-090-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Payyazhi Jayashree, Valerie Lindsay and Grace McCarthy

Taking a career capital approach, this paper addresses the issue of “pipeline block” frequently experienced by women seeking career advancement. Focusing on the Arab…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking a career capital approach, this paper addresses the issue of “pipeline block” frequently experienced by women seeking career advancement. Focusing on the Arab Middle East (AME) region, the authors take a contextually relevant multi-level approach to examine these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a qualitative, interview-based approach, drawing on data obtained from women leaders from the AME region. Drawing on Bourdieu's capital-field-habitus framework, we explore how women in the AME developed career capital in particular organisational fields.

Findings

The findings show the importance of human and social capital, as well as the influence of habitus for women's career advancement in specific fields. The study also highlights the unique contribution of cultural capital in helping women to navigate organisational fields where it is necessary to both challenge, and conform to, traditional norms.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include assumptions of homogeneity across countries of the AME, whereas differences are known to exist. Future research should consider these contextual differences, and also include a study of women who were not successful in gaining career advancement.

Practical implications

The study’s multi-level approach highlights practical implications for women, organisations and society. For organisations, the authors propose some context-relevant coaching strategies that can help women to attain leadership positions.

Social implications

The study’s multi-level approach highlights practical implications for women, organisations,and society. Focusing on organisations, the authors propose some context-relevant coaching strategies that can help women to attain advancement in their careers.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates originality in the findings by showing how women overcome the pipeline block in relation to their career advancement. The use of the Bourdieusian framework, an in-depth qualitative approach, and the AME context also add to the study's originality.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Lisa E. Baranik

The current study examined employment rates and predictors of employment among Syrian refugees currently living in Lebanon and Jordan. This paper argues that men and women…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study examined employment rates and predictors of employment among Syrian refugees currently living in Lebanon and Jordan. This paper argues that men and women refugees have different experiences seeking out employment after resettlement due to patriarchal structures and attitudes toward women that are present in the Arab Middle East. The goals of this paper were a) to examine employment rates among Syrian refugees, b) to examine predictors of employment among male and female refugees, and c) to examine refugee status as a moderator of the relationship between attitudes toward women and employment status.

Design/methodology/approach

Nationally representative data from the Arab Barometer on 600 refugees and 1400 native-born individuals living in Lebanon and Jordan from 2016–2017 were used.

Findings

Native-born individuals living in Lebanon and Jordan were 2.16 times more likely to be employed than refugees. Men living in Lebanon and Jordan were 7.83 times more likely to be employed than women. Finally, refugee status moderated the relationship between attitudes toward women's rights and roles and employment. Among native-born women, a positive attitude toward women's rights and roles predicted employment status, whereas this positive relationship was not found for women refugees. Among refugee men, a positive attitude toward women's rights and roles was linked to a lower likelihood of holding a job.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that agencies supporting refugees should communicate realistic expectations about employment during resettlement and should address the challenges that women refugees face when seeking employment.

Originality/value

This study is the first study to identify attitudes toward women's rights and roles as a predictor of employment among refugee populations and highlights the unique struggles that refugee women face.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Hasan Evrim arici, Huseyin Arasli and Nagihan Cakmakoglu Arici

This multilevel study investigates the effect of employees' perception of nepotism on tolerance to workplace incivility through the mediating role of psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

This multilevel study investigates the effect of employees' perception of nepotism on tolerance to workplace incivility through the mediating role of psychological contract violation and the moderating role of authentic leadership in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using time-lagged data from 547 frontline employees working in four- and five-star hotels, this study's hypotheses were analyzed by conducting hierarchical regression analysis and hierarchical linear modelling.

Findings

The findings indicate that non-family members' perception of nepotism triggered perceived tolerance to the uncivil behavior of family members by the management and that this relationship between nepotism perception and tolerance to workplace incivility was mediated by psychological contract violation. In line with expectations, authentic leadership moderated the effect of nepotism perception on tolerance to workplace incivility.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to examine the effects of nepotism perception on tolerance to workplace incivility by focusing on the mediator role of psychological contract violation at the individual level and the moderator role of authentic leadership at the group level.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13