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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Hasan Mohsen Alwadi, Naashia Mohamed and Aaron Wilson

This study arises from a recent school-based professional development (PD) programme conducted for English language teachers (ELTs) in a secondary school in the Kingdom of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study arises from a recent school-based professional development (PD) programme conducted for English language teachers (ELTs) in a secondary school in the Kingdom of Bahrain, where a participatory lesson study (PLS) strategy was implemented to develop four ELTs' teaching skills and their senior teacher's leadership. The influence of the PLS on creating a participatory PD experience for the participants was investigated through exploring their perceptions of their professional growth during their PLS experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a qualitative interpretive approach, a total of eight lesson study cases and 16 meetings were conducted and analysed.

Findings

The main factors that influenced the participants' perceptions of their professional growth in PLS were high self-efficacy and confidence; dominancy of their peers; the informality of the PLS practice; and reflective practice. Relatedly, the results revealed critical thoughts about PLS as a means for ELT's self-directed PD in non-native English-speaking contexts.

Originality/value

The study provides an alternative approach to PD that can be offered for ELTs in any ESL/EFL context that focusses on supporting non-native English-speaking teachers' practices by associating theory with practice. This approach has enabled them to gain the practical skills they need and develop their awareness about the theoretical principles of these practices. For the first time, teachers were given the role to act as the trainers and the theorisers of their own teaching practices.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Andrea M. Scheetz and Aaron B. Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether intention to report fraud varies by organization type or fraud type. Employees who self-select into not-for-profits may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether intention to report fraud varies by organization type or fraud type. Employees who self-select into not-for-profits may be inherently different from employees at other organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a 2 × 2 experiment in which (n=107) individuals with a bookkeeping or accounting background respond to a fraud scenario. Analysis of covariance models are used for data analysis.

Findings

The authors find evidence that not-for-profit employees are more likely to report fraud and that reporting intention does not differ significantly by fraud type.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include the simulation of a fraud through a hypothetical incident and the use of online participants.

Practical implications

This study expands the commitment literature by examining the role that commitment plays in the judgment and decision-making process of a whistleblower. Findings suggest affective commitment, which is an employee’s emotional attachment to the organization, and mediate the path between organization type and reporting intention. Affective commitment significantly predicts whistleblowing in not-for-profit organizations but not in for-profit organizations.

Originality/value

This research provides insight into how organization type influences whistleblowing intentions through constructs such as organizational commitment and public service motivation.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Mei Kuin Lai, Stuart McNaughton, Rebecca Jesson and Aaron Wilson

Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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