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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Aaron Asibi Abuosi and Mahama Braimah

The purpose of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with the quality of care in Ghana’s health-care facilities using a disaggregated approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with the quality of care in Ghana’s health-care facilities using a disaggregated approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a cross-sectional national survey. A sample of 4,079 males and females in the age group of 15-49 years were interviewed. Descriptive statistics, principal component analysis and t-tests were used in statistical analysis.

Findings

About 70 per cent of patients were satisfied with the quality of care provided in health-care facilities in Ghana, whereas about 30 per cent of patients were fairly satisfied. Females and insured patients were more likely to be satisfied with the quality of care, compared with males and uninsured patients.

Research limitations/implications

Because data were obtained from a national survey, the questionnaire did not include the type of facility patients attended to find out whether satisfaction with the quality of care varied by the type of health facility. Future studies may, therefore, include this.

Practical implications

The study contributes to the literature on patient satisfaction with the quality of care. It highlights that long waiting time remains an intractable problem at various service delivery units of health facilities and constitutes a major source of patient dissatisfaction with the quality of care. Innovative measures must, therefore, be adopted to address the problem.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of research that uses a disaggregated approach to examine patient satisfaction with the quality of care at various service delivery units of health facilities. This study is a modest contribution to this research gap.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Aaron Asibi Abuosi and Emmanuel Anongeba Anaba

The purpose of this paper is to explore perceived barriers to accessing and using adolescent health services in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore perceived barriers to accessing and using adolescent health services in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a qualitative study adopting a case study design. In total, 24 adolescents were recruited from four adolescent health facilities in Tema, a suburb of Ghana, using convenient sampling. In-depth interviews with respondents were conducted coupled with the taking of field notes and personal observations. Data collection took place between January and May 2017. Data were transcribed, managed and coded for themes. Thematic analysis was guided by Braun and Clarke’s (2006) Framework.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that majority of the respondents were females (54 percent) older adolescents (above 15 years (60 percent), students (79 percent)), had junior high school education and stayed with their biological parent(s) (70 percent). Adolescents in this study perceived four main barriers that restrict their access to or use of adolescent health services. The barriers were found at the facility level, provider level, community level and personal level.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide evidence-based information for planning adolescent health care interventions that would improve adolescents’ access to and use of health services in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Joshua Cobby Azilaku, Patience Aseweh Abor, Aaron Asibi Abuosi, Emmanuel Anongeba Anaba and Abraham Titiati

Clinical governance (CG) is crucial for healthcare quality of care improvement and safeguarding high standards of care. Little is known about CG in sub-Saharan Africa. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical governance (CG) is crucial for healthcare quality of care improvement and safeguarding high standards of care. Little is known about CG in sub-Saharan Africa. The authors assessed health workers' perceptions of CG and hospital performance in Ghana's psychiatric hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 230 health workers across two psychiatric hospitals in Ghana. Data were collected with a structured questionnaire and analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 23.0.

Findings

The majority (59.5%) of the respondents were females. The authors found that less than five in ten respondents felt that the hospitals have adopted measures to promote quality assurance (43.2%) and research and development (43.7%). However, a little above half of the respondents felt that the hospitals have adopted measures to promote education and training (57.7%); clinical audit (52.7%); risk management (50.7%) and clinical effectiveness (68.6%). The authors also found a statistically significant association between CG and hospital performance (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

There was a positive relationship between CG and hospital performance. Therefore, investing in CG may help to increase hospital performance.

Originality/value

This is the maiden study to investigate CG and hospital performance in Ghana's psychiatric hospitals and one of the few studies in Africa. This study makes a modest contribution to the global discourse on the subject matter.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Priscilla Anaba, Emmanuel Anongeba Anaba and Aaron Asibi Abuosi

Promoting patient satisfaction is crucial for healthcare quality improvement. However, literature on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ghana is limited. The aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

Promoting patient satisfaction is crucial for healthcare quality improvement. However, literature on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ghana is limited. The aim of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, the largest tertiary hospital in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a cross-sectional study. A sample of one hundred (n = 100) in-patients in the surgical department were interviewed. Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS), version 22, was used to analyze the data. The results were presented using univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses.

Findings

It was found that majority of the respondents were males (53%), employed (56%) and insured (85%). It was also found that eight in ten respondents were satisfied with the perioperative nursing care. Overall patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care was significantly associated with information provision (p < 0.001), nurse–patient relationship (p < 0.001), fear and concern (p < 0.05) and discomfort and need (p < 0.05). At the multivariate level, overall patient satisfaction was significantly influenced by nurse–patient relationship (β = 0.430, p = 0.002).

Originality/value

There is limited literature on nursing care in surgical departments and rarely are patients' views considered in assessing quality of perioperative care, especially in Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs). This study is a modest contribution to the literature on patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Emmanuel Anongeba Anaba and Aaron Asibi Abuosi

Adolescents are more exposed to risky health behaviors. However, many adolescents do not seek health care due to the poor quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Adolescents are more exposed to risky health behaviors. However, many adolescents do not seek health care due to the poor quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to assess health care quality in adolescent clinics in Tema, a suburb of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey design was adopted to collect data from 365 adolescent respondents. Data were analyzed with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Science (version 20) using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression.

Findings

The results demonstrate that adolescents perceived quality of care in adolescent clinics to be good. The significant predictors of adolescents’ overall perceptions of quality of care were provider competencies (β=0.311, p<0.01), adolescent’s health literacy (β=0.359, p<0.01), appropriate package of services (β=0.093, p<0.05), and equity and non-discrimination (β=0.162, p<0.01).

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in an urban setting. Therefore, the generalization of findings must be done with caution.

Originality/value

Adolescent health care quality in Ghana is below expectation. However, it has received little attention from researchers. This study provides empirical evidence for adolescent health care quality improvement in developing countries like Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Aaron Asibi Abuosi

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether there are any significant gaps in perceptions of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers in Ghana’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether there are any significant gaps in perceptions of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers in Ghana’s hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of patients seeking outpatient consultations in 17 general hospitals in Ghana was conducted. A total of 818 patients and 152 hospital managers were interviewed. A 22-item quality of care scale was used in data collection. Data were analysed with the aid SPSS version 20. Summary statistics and t-test were used to analyse the data.

Findings

There was a significant difference in the overall perception of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers (Patients: M=89.11, SD=11.457; Providers: M=94.60, SD=10.922; t (845) −4.956, p < 001, two-tailed). Also, 18 items out of the 22-item quality of care scale showed significant difference between patients and providers. However, levels of quality of care is generally rated fairly favourably by both category of respondents.

Research limitations/implications

Further study is required to explore the reasons for the perceived quality gaps between patients and healthcare providers.

Practical implications

Management of hospitals need to evaluate patients’ perceptions of quality of care to inform measures aimed at improving quality of care, since what they may consider as good quality service may be rated less favourably by patients.

Originality/value

Comparing perceptions of quality between patients and healthcare providers is important in order adopt measures to address any differences in perceptions of quality between the two stakeholders. To the best of the author’s knowledge no study has been conducted in Ghana to that effect.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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