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Article

Lisa Maltman and Laura Hamilton

Positive professional attitudes towards personality‐disordered clients have been linked with extensive clinical and strategic benefits. The largest influences upon such…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive professional attitudes towards personality‐disordered clients have been linked with extensive clinical and strategic benefits. The largest influences upon such attitudes are associated with staff training, supervision and support. This preliminary evaluation seeks to consider the effect of an introductory personality disorder awareness workshop upon trainees' attitudes towards personality disordered prisoners.

Design/methodology/approach

The attitude towards personality disorder questionnaire (APDQ) was administered to prison staff (predominantly prison officers) immediately before the workshop and then re‐tested, on average, two months later.

Findings

The study sample (n=26) showed significant improvements on the “security versus vulnerability” APDQ sub‐scale. The remaining four sub‐scales and overall APDQ scores showed no significant change.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that personality disorder awareness training should initially engage with trainees' perceptions of their personal security and vulnerability when working with this client group, rather than aiming to increase liking, enjoyment and acceptance of such offenders.

Originality/value

This study marks a preliminary analysis of a new personality disorder awareness training programme.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Article

Catherine Woodward, Alan Jones and Tasim Martin

It is recognised that training is required for staff working with people with a diagnosis of personality disorder, as it poses challenges requiring particular skills and…

Abstract

It is recognised that training is required for staff working with people with a diagnosis of personality disorder, as it poses challenges requiring particular skills and abilities (National Institute for Mental Health in England, 2003a). The proposal to train graduate primary care mental health workers (GPCMHWs) to work with the client group met with some scepticism by senior clinicians. However, the experience of providing training and supervision to the graduate primary care mental health workers to work with clients with personality disorder in Camden and Islington has proved positive. Several characteristics of the GPCMHWs identified in the training literature might contribute to this positive experience. Those factors include cognitive ability, motivation to learn, age, and attitudes. Initial findings from the evaluation of the training shows that graduate workers respond positively to the training, showing improvements in self‐rated knowledge and skills relating to working with the client group, and an eagerness to learn more. The relevance of this to the personality disorder capabilities framework are described.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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