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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Andres Salas-Vallina, Susana Pasamar and Mario J. Donate

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) practices on organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), in medical…

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1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) practices on organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), in medical staff working in specialized units. In addition, we check the mediating role of work-related well-being, understood as engagement, trust and exhaustion, in the relationship between AMO practices and OCB. Furthermore, the moderating role of service leadership is analysed in the relationship between AMO practices and work-related well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the AMO framework under the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, and based on a sample of 214 employees from public healthcare, a time-lagged moderation-mediation model was performed.

Findings

Results provide evidence that AMO practices have a positive effect on OCB. Further, work-related well-being mediated the effect of AMO practices on OCB. In addition, service leadership exerted a moderating role between AMO practices and work-related well-being.

Originality/value

Building on recent research which has emphasized the knowledge gap regarding how human resource practices might positively affect both employees and organizations, this is the first study that indicates that said practices positively affect both employee well-being and OCBs in the public healthcare context.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Chaminda Wijethilake, Rahat Munir and Ranjith Appuhami

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of management control systems (MCS) in strategically responding to institutional pressures for sustainability (IPS)…

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3365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of management control systems (MCS) in strategically responding to institutional pressures for sustainability (IPS). Drawing on institutional theory (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983) and strategic responses to institutional pressures framework (Oliver, 1991), the study argues that organisations strategically respond to IPS using MCS.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by interviewing sustainability managers of a large-scale multinational apparel manufacturing organisation with its headquarters in Sri Lanka.

Findings

The study finds that organisations actively respond to IPS using acquiescence, compromise, avoidance, defiance, and manipulation strategies. The results not only reveal that formal MCS play a critical role in complying with IPS, but also in more active responses, including compromise, avoidance, defiance, and manipulation. The findings highlight that organisations use MCS as a medium to respond strategically to IPS, and in turn, the use of MCS has important implications for organisational change and improvement.

Practical implications

The study has implications for Western organisations, finding that suppliers committed to sustainability in Asia strategically respond to IPS as a means of strengthening outsourcing contracts, instead of blindly accepting. Findings indicate that organisational changes and success seem to be a function of strategically responding to IPS rather than operating an organisation by neglecting sustainability challenges. The organisational ability to use MCS in strategically responding to IPS has the potential for long-term value creation.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into the MCS, strategy and sustainability literatures by exploring different uses of MCS tools in strategically responding to IPS. More specifically, it shows how the use of MCS tools varies in supporting strategic responses, and with respective IPS. In doing so, it enhances our understanding of the importance of the use of MCS in dynamics of institutional change and practical variances in strategically responding to IPS.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Fiona Edgar, Jing A. Zhang and Nancy M. Blaker

Drawing on the dynamic model of ability, motivation, opportunity (AMO) for human resource research, this study aims to examine how organizational system-level (i.e. the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the dynamic model of ability, motivation, opportunity (AMO) for human resource research, this study aims to examine how organizational system-level (i.e. the high-performance work system (HPWS)) and individual-level AMO affect employees' performance. Specifically, this paper proposes that employee task performance is resultant from the integration of system- and individual-level AMO factors with employee contextual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design is employed with data collected from 250 employees working in New Zealand's service sector.

Findings

This study finds both organizational system (HPWS) and individual AMO dimensions have positive associations with employees' performance. At the system level, the supportive role played by contextual performance is highlighted with pro-social behaviors fully mediating the relationship between the HPWS and task performance. At the individual level, contextual performance is found to partially mediate the relationship between ability and task performance and fully mediate the relationship between motivation and task performance. Opportunity, on the other hand, is significantly associated with task but not contextual performance.

Originality/value

In acknowledging there are a plurality of factors that impact performance, this study enriches our understanding of AMO's influence in the context of people management.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Pooja Malik and Usha Lenka

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of perceived abilities-motivation-opportunity (AMO framework) enhancing human resource management practices on…

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1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of perceived abilities-motivation-opportunity (AMO framework) enhancing human resource management practices on destructive and constructive deviance through employee engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 350 middle-level information technology employees. Structural equation modeling was applied to examine the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results revealed significant relationships between perceived AMO framework and destructive and constructive deviance, except for the relationship between perceived ability and destructive deviance. Furthermore, perceived AMO framework exhibited a significant positive relationship with employee engagement. Utilizing social exchange theory, results proposed partial mediation of employee engagement between perceived AMO framework and constructive and destructive deviance except for the relationship between perceived ability and destructive deviance, for which employee engagement exhibited full mediation.

Research limitations/implications

This study implies that contemporary organizations must take initiatives to enhance employee engagement through the implementation of abilities, motivation and opportunities-enhancing human resource management (HRM) practices (AMO framework). Results of the study infer that motivation-enhancing HRM practices contribute highest in generating employee engagement followed by opportunity and abilities-enhancing HRM practices.

Originality/value

This study empirically investigates the impact of HRM bundles on both destructive and constructive deviance. Additionally, this study explores the underlying mechanism between HRM bundles and workplace deviance by assessing the mediating role of employee engagement.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Francisco Rincon-Roldan and Alvaro Lopez-Cabrales

The aim of this study was to analyse the link between the values that govern the functioning of cooperatives and their sustainability. Furthermore, the authors propose…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to analyse the link between the values that govern the functioning of cooperatives and their sustainability. Furthermore, the authors propose that this relationship is mediated by AMO (ability, motivation and opportunity) practices, which generate different behaviours and attitudes in their employees, thus strengthening the message of sustainable management that the directors of this kind of companies aim to transmit.

Design/methodology/approach

This article presents a theoretical and empirical research model about the relationship between organisational values, AMO practices and sustainability in social economy firms. The proposed model was tested using the multivariate method of partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) with a sample of 124 cooperative companies. The information was gathered through a questionnaire with questions composed of measurement scales that had been previously validated by the reference literature.

Findings

This work empirically demonstrates that the perceived support, respect and responsibility values are strongly related to sustainability, and that ability and opportunity-enhancing practices mediate the association of perceived support and responsibility with the sustainability of cooperatives.

Originality/value

This work contributes to covering the lack of studies about which values support and impact the sustainability of organisations, and it provides information about the mediating role of certain AMO practices in the search for a more sustainable organisation, demonstrating that some practices are more relevant than others.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Shatha M. Obeidat, Rebecca Mitchell and Mark Bray

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the relationship between high-performance work practices (HPWP) and organizational performance through a…

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6900

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the relationship between high-performance work practices (HPWP) and organizational performance through a multi-dimensional model of the relationship between HPWP and performance, which conceptualizes HPWP according to the ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) framework. HPWP are conceptualized as HR practices capable of enhancing the AMO of employees to contribute to organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 118 Jordanian firms operating in the financial and manufacturing sectors. A questionnaire completed by the HR director in each firm assessed HPWP adoption and their influence on organizational performance.

Findings

The findings generate support for the link between HPWP and organizational performance and confirm the utility of the AMO model for conceptualizing HPWP and their impact on organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

While this study relies on cross-sectional data, it confirms the utility of the AMO framework as an appropriate conceptual basis for HPWP and provides substantial support for the relevance of HPWP in increasing organizational performance.

Originality/value

The findings provide a basis for more consistent empirical investigation and better theory building for HPWP, and also provide a more robust basis for practical prescription. The empirical contribution is also significant as one of the few studies to investigate the link between HPWP and organizational performance in the Middle East.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Alberto Bayo-Moriones and Alejandro Bello-Pindado

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact on manufacturing performance of human resource management (HRM) practices across two job levels within manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact on manufacturing performance of human resource management (HRM) practices across two job levels within manufacturing firms in Argentina and Uruguay: that of line managers and frontline workers. HRM practices are categorised into three bundles defined by the AMO theoretical framework: ability, motivation and opportunity.

Design/methodology/approach

The article uses data from a survey to 301 manufacturing plants in Uruguay and Argentina. Given the characteristics of the dependent variable, linear regression models have been estimated in order to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that the ability and opportunity bundles for line managers are positively associated with manufacturing performance. However, only the motivation bundle affects manufacturing performance for frontline workers.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations are the use of cross-sectional data, the focus on two specific countries and the analysis of two employee categories that are not completely homogenous. The paper extends the contingency perspective in HRM by examining the relevance of job level as a contingent factor in the HRM-performance relationship in the manufacturing industry.

Practical implications

The results suggest that manufacturing companies should target HR investments more towards line managers than to frontline employees. More specifically, they should concentrate efforts on the ability and opportunity bundles.

Originality/value

The article contributes to the very limited empirical evidence on the impact of HRM differentiation on firm performance by analysing sub-dimensions in a context not previously analysed.

Objetivo

El objetivo del trabajo es analizar el impacto sobre los resultados de manufactura de la aplicación de prácticas de Dirección de Recursos Humanos en dos niveles de empleados dentro de las empresas industriales argentinas y uruguayas: los supervisores y los operarios de producción. Las prácticas de DRH son clasificadas en tres paquetes de acuerdo con el marco definido por el modelo AMO: capacidad, motivación y oportunidad.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

El artículo utiliza datos procedentes de una encuesta realizada a 301 plantas industriales en Uruguay y Argentina. Dadas las características de la variable dependiente, se estiman modelos de regresión lineal para contrastar las hipótesis.

Hallazgos

Nuestros resultados muestran que los paquetes de prácticas orientados a la capacidad y la oportunidad para los supervisores están asociados positivamente con los resultados de manufactura. Sin embargo, solo el paquete de prácticas orientado a la motivación afecta a los resultados de manufactura para los operarios de producción.

Limitaciones/implicaciones de investigación

Las principales limitaciones son el uso de datos transversales, el enfoque en dos países concretos y el análisis de dos ocupaciones que no son completamente homogéneas. Este trabajo extiende la perspectiva contingente analizando la importancia del nivel jerárquico del puesto como un factor de contingencia en la relación DRH-resultados en la industria manufacturera.

Implicaciones prácticas

Los resultados sugieren que las empresas industriales deberían dirigir sus inversiones en DRH más hacia los supervisores que hacia los operarios. Más concretamente, deberían concentrar sus esfuerzos en los paquetes de capacidad y oportunidad.

Originalidad/valor

El artículo contribuye a la escasa evidencia empírica sobre el impacto de la diferenciación de la DRH sobre los resultados de manufactura analizando subdimensiones en un contexto no estudiado con anterioridad.

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Paula K. Mowbray, Adrian Wilkinson and Herman H.M. Tse

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model drawing together and integrating research from employment relations (ER), human resource management (HRM) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model drawing together and integrating research from employment relations (ER), human resource management (HRM) and organizational behaviour (OB) to identify how high-performance work systems (HPWS) encourage voice behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify shortcomings in research on the relationship between HPWS practices and employee voice behaviour, attributable to the disparate conceptualization of voice across management disciplines. The authors then present a conceptual model using the ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) framework to theorize how the ER climate influences the design of the HPWS and subsequently how the HPWS encourages voice behaviour. Practical implications and recommendations for future studies are provided.

Findings

The mutual gains ER climate will influence the design of the HPWS; in turn the HPWS' practices will influence line manager AMO to manage voice and the employees' AMO to engage in voice behaviour, resulting in the encouragement of both employer and employee interest forms of voice.

Practical implications

The HPWS-voice behaviour interaction model sheds light on the types of HR practices organisations can implement to optimize employee voice behaviour.

Originality/value

The conceptual model demonstrates how ER, HRM and OB factors influence voice behaviour within a HPWS, which has not previously been considered by voice scholars. The integrated conceptual model encourages a multidisciplinary approach to studying employee voice in future research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Khuram Shahzad, Pia Arenius, Alan Muller, Muhammad Athar Rasheed and Sami Ullah Bajwa

The purpose of this paper is to explore the black box between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and innovation performance in small- and medium-sized enterprises…

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1054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the black box between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and innovation performance in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Through application of the ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) framework, the study examines the mediating roles of innovation-specific ability, motivation and voice behaviors between HPWS and SMEs’ innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested on data collected through a self-administered questionnaire from 237 SMEs in Pakistan.

Findings

Findings indicate that human capital, motivation and employee voice fully mediate the relationship between HPWS and innovation performance in SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research design and self-reported measures warrant caution for the interpretation of findings. Future research may consider a longitudinal research design and objective measures.

Practical implications

SMEs need to invest in the adoption and implementation of HPWS that will develop innovation-specific abilities, motivation and voice behaviors simultaneously among employees that will lead to higher innovation performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind utilizing an AMO framework to investigate the underlying mechanism through which HPWS affect innovation performance in SMEs.

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Sabeen Hussain Bhatti, Ramsha Zakariya, Demetris Vrontis, Gabriele Santoro and Michael Christofi

This article aims to explore the relationship among high performance work systems (HPWS), innovation, and knowledge sharing in project-based organizations.

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1267

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the relationship among high performance work systems (HPWS), innovation, and knowledge sharing in project-based organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the ability, motivation, and opportunity (AMO) framework under the theory of HPWS, our article hypothesizes that the AMO enhancing practices of project-based organizations lead to better innovation performance of their employees through the mediating role of knowledge sharing. Time-lagged data of AMO practices and knowledge sharing practices were collected from the employees of these organizations over three weeks. Furthermore, the innovation performance data were collected from the supervisors of these employees over an additional three-week period.

Findings

Our results confirm the initial hypothesis of the causal relationship of two of the AMO HRM practices, that is, ability and motivation with innovation performance with the mediation of knowledge sharing, while the third hypothesis of opportunity enhancing HRM practice was not accepted.

Originality/value

This research has implications for both theory and practice and it can help the project managers of these organizations to better design HRM practices in order to improve the creativity and innovation performance of their employees. Accordingly, this is one of the first studies dealing with the effectiveness of HRM on AMO, and the key role of knowledge sharing.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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