Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

John B. White, Morgan P. Miles and William Levernier

The purpose of this paper is to explore how AACSB might better position itself through brand management.

Downloads
895

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how AACSB might better position itself through brand management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper attempts to offer suggestions on a different branding strategy for AACSB

Findings

The paper suggests that AACSB establishes different levels of accreditation, each having different standards and each having a different level of prestige. This repositioning of the AACSB brand would make the accreditation standards flexible, depending on the resources a school wanted to devote to business education, and the prestige that the school wished to achieve with accreditation.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by proposing a solution that will enhance the value of AACSB accreditation to schools of different resource endowments.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Thomas G. Noland, Shawn Mauldin and Robert L. Braun

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first purpose is to inform faculty who are thinking of becoming a department head about the challenges they face if they choose…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first purpose is to inform faculty who are thinking of becoming a department head about the challenges they face if they choose to pursue a department head opportunity. The second purpose is to provide insight into the leadership of the accounting departments by looking at various workload aspects of department heads. The authors surveyed accounting department heads from programs with the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accounting accreditation, AACSB business only accreditation, and non-AACSB accreditation. Surveys were sent to 918 individuals listed as the leader of an accounting program in the 2016–2017 Hasselback Accounting Directory with 144 individuals responding (15.7% response rate). In addition to the workload of the department head in the areas of teaching, research, and service, the study analyzed the major challenges and difficulties the department head faces. The study also sought responses from survey participants on additional issues such as the benefits of AACSB accreditation and compensation.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Goutam Kumar Kundu and Jyoti Prakas Majumdar

The paper aims to develop a process model for implementation in a business school setting, by doing a thorough analysis of the requirement of the Association to Advance…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to develop a process model for implementation in a business school setting, by doing a thorough analysis of the requirement of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) standards relating to the learning and teaching area.

Design/methodology/approach

The process model is developed by adopting a three-step approach. The authors have presented an articulated procedure for the development of the process model.

Findings

The process model presented in this paper offers a systemic approach to process design and implementation in a business school environment. The process model was developed and applied over the course of systematic reviews in a business school setting by aligning with the requirements of AACSB accreditation standards belonging to the learning and teaching area.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the present study is that the scope of the process model presented here is limited to the requirements of the AACSB standards belonging to the learning and teaching area only. The authors plan to develop process models for the other areas of AACSB standards in the near future.

Practical implications

It is hoped that this paper can bring a contribution to professionals as well as academics, in regards to development of process framework complying with the requirements of the AACSB standards. The process model presented in this paper comprises macro-level processes and the related activities. It will serve as a guide to develop processes in a business school setting.

Originality/value

The present study has attempted to present a process model complying with requirements of the AACSB standards belong to the learning and teaching area. The authors feel that developed process model can be used by the business schools that are planning to implement AACSB standards for accreditation or are interested in modifying their current processes following the requirements of the AACSB standards.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Chester C. Cotton, John F. McKenna, Stuart Van Auken and Richard A. Yeider

Attitudes of deans of American Assembly of Collegiate Schools ofBusiness (AACSB) accredited schools/colleges of business were surveyedregarding nine areas central to the…

Abstract

Attitudes of deans of American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools/colleges of business were surveyed regarding nine areas central to the practice of collegiate level business education. These deans were then classified into three categories in a manner consistent with the new AACSB standards for accreditation. Finally, a one‐way ANOVA indicated the degree to which the attitudes of these groups of deans differed across items on the original instrument. The study suggests implications for the revised accreditation process of the AACSB.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Kam C. Chan, Annie Wong and Hannah Wong

The purpose of this paper is to provide a complementary analysis of finance journals that are often being overlooked in prior studies. Specifically, the authors examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a complementary analysis of finance journals that are often being overlooked in prior studies. Specifically, the authors examine the Australian Business Dean Council’s (ABDC’s) C-ranked journals in terms of their authors’ affiliations with US colleges, US colleges with Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditations, and US colleges with AACSB doctoral program accreditations.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of C-ranked journals is downloaded from the ABDC’s website. Full-text articles of these journals are downloaded from library databases for the five-year period of 2009-2013. Author affiliations are collected from the corresponding articles. Journal histories, journal editor locations, Cabell’s journal rankings, and acceptance rates are collected from the ABDC’s database, Cabell’s Directory, journal websites, and library databases. The final sample consists of 28 finance journals.

Findings

The authors find that these journals have a substantial number and percentage of authors from US colleges. Among the US authors, about 92 percent of them are from AACSB accredited schools and most of them are from AACSB accredited schools with doctoral programs. The findings support the notion that these journals are important publication outlets for US researchers. The authors also find that journals with longer histories and US-based editors have a higher percentage of US authors. In addition, journals with better Cabell’s journal rankings and higher rejection rates have higher percentage of US authors from AACSB accredited schools with doctoral programs.

Originality/value

C-ranked journals are often neglected in prior studies on journal characteristics because they are less well-known and less likely to be cited. However, these journals constitute as many as half of all finance journals in the ABDC database and can be important publication outlets for finance researchers. This study contributes to the literature by examining the author characteristics of these journals, namely, the proportions of authors who come from US colleges and authors who come from AACSB accredited US programs. Such an analysis will provide valuable insight into the value of these journals.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

William I. MacKenzie Jr, Robert F. Scherer, Timothy J. Wilkinson and Norman A. Solomon

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the research on the quality and value of AACSB International accreditation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the research on the quality and value of AACSB International accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were abstracted from published journal articles between 2003 and 2017 in which the words “AACSB” and “quality” or “value” (or both quality and value) were used in the title or the article text.

Findings

In total, 91 studies were identified that have been published on the value and/or quality of AACSB accreditation. These studies focused primarily on students and faculty and were conducted using survey research methods. Results indicate that accreditation does have some effects on stakeholder value and quality.

Research limitations/implications

While there is evidence to support the importance of accreditation to enhance the quality and value of business schools, additional research is needed to empirically support the quality and value propositions.

Practical implications

In order to effectively communicate to stakeholders how AACSB accreditation enhances the business school, the current study’s findings indicate that identification of indicators and factors that affect quality and value would be productive.

Originality/value

This study contributes insight on what is currently known about the quality and value of AACSB accreditation to both internal and external stakeholders from research conducted over an extended period of time.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Andrea Everard, Jennifer Edmonds and Kent St. Pierre

The main contribution of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) appears to be the credibility they add to a school that has achieved…

Downloads
303

Abstract

Purpose

The main contribution of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) appears to be the credibility they add to a school that has achieved accreditation and the branding they provide to an accredited school that helps the market differentiate between high quality programs and those that have not achieved that status. The authors ask a simple question in this paper – if the AACSB were a business school, would it receive accreditation?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper tests the assumptions by examining all accredited US programs to determine whether the quality of the schools accredited prior to the change to the mission-driven approach was equal to the quality of the schools accredited after the change.

Findings

The paper empirically demonstrate that since the move to a mission-driven focus in the early 1990s, the AACSB has not achieved its own mission and may have damaged its credibility in the process.

Research limitations/implications

This failure raises the question of whether the organization actually provides the necessary information for third parties to differentiate between high quality business programs and those that do not meet the same standards. This puts into question the value of the AACSB brand.

Practical implications

The AACSB has the ability and responsibility to do better in its role as the main accreditation body for business schools.

Originality/value

It is the hope that the insight provided in this paper will initiate a serious discussion about the role of the AACSB in the determination of quality in business schools and how this role can be enhanced.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Morgan P Miles, Martin Grimmer and Geralyn McClure Franklin

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the question of how well business school accreditation bodies manage their own brands. It does so by extending research on…

Downloads
1002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the question of how well business school accreditation bodies manage their own brands. It does so by extending research on business school branding by Pitt et al. (2006) to explore how well business school accreditation organizations such as AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the Association of MBAs, and the European Foundation for Management Development Quality Improvement System manage their brands.

Design/methodology/approach

An on-line survey of business school deans was conducted during October and November of 2013. SurveyMonkey was used to administer the survey to 1,131 valid e-mail addresses found for the deans of member schools.

Findings

Business school deans face complex decisions in terms of marketing. The selection of which accreditation “co-brand” to seek is both strategically relevant to the market position of the business school and has numerous financial and often career implications. The findings in this research suggest that AACSB is perceived by a broad global sample of business school deans to be generally the strongest brand, and therefore likely the best choice if a school is seeking only one accreditation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of business school marketing, strategic planning, and branding in a highly competitive global market.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Goutam Kumar Kundu and Jayachandra Bairi

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of a checklist, focusing on the detailed analysis of the requirement of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools…

Downloads
2230

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of a checklist, focusing on the detailed analysis of the requirement of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) standards related to strategic management and innovation area, for evaluation of implementation readiness in a business school setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an articulated procedure for the development of the checklist. The study adopted a multi-method approach for developing the final content for the checklist.

Findings

The introduction of the checklist has provided a systemic approach to process design and evaluation of readiness of a business school for AACSB accreditation related to strategic management and innovation area. The checklist was developed and applied over the course of systematic reviews in a business school setting.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has developed the checklist comprising the requirements of the standards related to strategic management and innovation area only. In the near future, the authors intend to develop checklists for the remaining areas of AACSB standards.

Originality/value

The present work attempts to develop a comprehensive checklist comprising the requirements of the standards related to strategic management and innovation area. Academic institutions can benefit from the checklist whether they are planning to implement AACSB standards for accreditation or are interested in changing their current processes following AACSB standards.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Ellen J. Dumond and Thomas W. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into quality management for business education. The paper provides business schools and Association to Advance Collegiate…

Downloads
1372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into quality management for business education. The paper provides business schools and Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) with information about two different quality standards and suggests how the AACSB accreditation process might be strengthened – thereby improving the quality of the education process and product.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare two prevalent but different approaches to quality management: the AACSB accreditation standards and ISO 9001, a set of quality requirements developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). For this comparison, the authors review the literature in the field, including published quality standards, organization examples documenting implementation of AACSB or ISO 9001 standards, and existing empirical research results on the two approaches.

Findings

Both quality approaches have their merits and followers. It seems feasible that AACSB might be able to borrow some elements from the ISO 9001 components and process to improve their accreditation process. For example, they might wish to consider more standardized auditor training, the use of a third party auditing body, incorporation of a process orientation and a system of continuous improvement, as well as more overall reliance on the quality principles in ISO 9001.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a conceptual one without empirical data. As such, it has limitations. Further research is needed to gather empirical data to continue the investigation between these two approaches to quality management in education.

Practical implications

It is hoped that, with awareness and integration of some of the ISO 9001 components, AACSB and educational administrators are able to improve the accreditation process for business schools, thereby improving the overall education process and product.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comparison of two different but prevalent approaches to quality management within educational organizations. It presents insight for business schools seeking to adopt either of these approaches and provides suggestions for improvement of the AACSB standards. This discussion is valuable as it seeks to improve the quality of business education while it operates in an environment with increasingly limited resources.

1 – 10 of over 1000