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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

P. Tucker, P. Douglas, A. Durrant and A.S. Hursthouse

Examines whether there are any environmental or health implications associated with the increased use of colour in newspapers, if the newspapers are reused or recycled…

Abstract

Examines whether there are any environmental or health implications associated with the increased use of colour in newspapers, if the newspapers are reused or recycled. New heavy metal analyses of UK daily newspapers from 1992, 1996 and 1998 are reported. Lead, mercury and cadmium were found to be below their measurement detection limits (4ppm, 5ppm and 1ppm respectively) in nearly all samples. Barium and total chromium levels were highest in supplements printed on “glossy” paper. Copper was present at levels around 20‐30ppm in the standard newsprint sections and at levels of 80ppm or more in the supplements. Copper concentrations increased by 33‐40 per cent between 1992 and 1998 which correlated well with the increased colour content. A scientific appraisal and review showed that the heavy metal contents of newspapers are highly unlikely to pose any environmental risk or to have any health implications.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

P. McDonald, G.T. Cook and M.S. Baxter

Seaweeds are known accumulators of trace elements and edibleseaweeds are popular commodities in health food outlets. This particularstudy covered an area directly affected…

Abstract

Seaweeds are known accumulators of trace elements and edible seaweeds are popular commodities in health food outlets. This particular study covered an area directly affected by discharges from the Dounreay and Sellafield nuclear plants. The results indicate that radionuclide activity levels in Scottish edible seaweeds are low but are marginally high on the north‐west coast than the north‐east. Natural radionuclides are about two orders of magnitude more abundant than those from the nuclear industry. Comparisons were made with Japanese seaweeds: activities were within the same range.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

George Steinmetz

This review of Amy Allen’s book, The End of Progress (2016), first addresses the structure of the book and focuses on specific points made in individual chapters…

Abstract

This review of Amy Allen’s book, The End of Progress (2016), first addresses the structure of the book and focuses on specific points made in individual chapters, including the affinity between postcolonial theory and the approaches of Adorno and Foucault in subjecting the notion of historical progress to “withering critique,” and Allen’s alternative approach to decolonization; Habermas’ aim to put critical theory on a secure normative footing; Honneth’s stance that the history of an ethical sphere is an unplanned learning process kept in motion by a struggle for recognition; Forst’s attempt to reconstruct Critical Theory’s normative account through a return to Kant rather than Hegel; and Allen’s claim that her approach is fully in the spirit of Critical Theory and could be seen as continuation of Critical Theory’s first generation, as in Adorno, and how it is a “genealogical” approach that draws on Adorno’s negative dialectics and critique of identity thinking, as well as on Nietzsche’s conception of genealogy, as developed by Foucault. The second part of my response raises three issues: (1) Allen’s partial compromise with the idea of progress; (2) whether critical theory would profit from engagement with other critical theories and theories of ethics, beyond postcolonial theory; and (3) nonwestern theories shed a different light on the question of Allen’s critique, a theme that also draws attention to the gesture of decolonizing, the distinctions between colonialism and empire, and the sociology of knowledge production.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2016

Giuseppe Naimo

The virtuous character and the ethical agent represent mutually inclusive terms, neither of which independently, in the Aristotelian tradition, is considered an innate…

Abstract

The virtuous character and the ethical agent represent mutually inclusive terms, neither of which independently, in the Aristotelian tradition, is considered an innate quality. Virtues, if not innate, are contingent; but what makes each instantiation recognisably general? Normative ethics in this sense is a dynamic process and similarly process philosophy is based on the principle that existence is dynamic and that it should be the primary focus of any philosophical account of reality. I argue that the transformative process is equally as important as the end result of realising the virtuous dispositional traits. An important criticism of virtue ethics is the focus on character and not rules such as industry practices and codes found in the professions. The criticism however is less worrisome than usually accepted. The reasoning herein developed to overcome this criticism rests on the presupposition that no one exists in isolation and virtues are developed in a social context and not simply given. Using process philosophy as a methodological approach to examine virtue ethical agency and the transformative process involved in its realisation elicits insights that allow the conceptual development of a more robust account of virtue ethics. I extend this nuanced rendition, in ways already commenced by others, into areas of organisational, environmental and intergenerational ethics.

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Contemporary Issues in Applied and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-443-3

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Neil Kenneth McBride

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel mnemonic, ACTIVE, inspired by Mason's 1985 PAPA mnemonic, which will help researchers and IT professionals develop an

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel mnemonic, ACTIVE, inspired by Mason's 1985 PAPA mnemonic, which will help researchers and IT professionals develop an understanding of the major issues in information ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical foundations are developed for each element of the mnemonic by reference to philosophical definitions of the terms used and to virtue ethics, particularly MacIntyrean virtue ethics. The paper starts with a critique of the elements of the PAPA mnemonic and then proceeds to develop an understanding of each of the elements of ACTIVE ethics, via a discussion of the underpinning virtue ethics.

Findings

This paper identifies six issues, described by the mnemonic, ACTIVE. ACTIVE stands for: autonomy, the ability of the individual to manage their own information and make choice; community, the ethical effect of an information systems on the community which it supports; transparency, the extent to which the derivation of content and process in an information system is made clear; identity, the social and ethical effect of an information system on the definition and maintenance of the distinctive characteristics of a person; value, the value or moral worth placed on information associated with an individual and hence on the relationship with the individual; and empathy, the ability of the information systems professional to emotionally connect with the user and the extent to which the information system distances or connects.

Originality/value

The paper applies virtue ethics to developing a tool to help information professionals reflect on their ethical practice in developing and supporting information systems.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Rosa Slegers

This chapter offers a critical evaluation of the narrative of the entrepreneur-adventurer common in business schools today. It suggests that this narrative stands in the…

Abstract

This chapter offers a critical evaluation of the narrative of the entrepreneur-adventurer common in business schools today. It suggests that this narrative stands in the way of meaningful ethics integration in business education in part because it fails to encourage or even acknowledge insights that are “felt” rather than merely intellectually registered. Philosopher-writers like Henri Bergson, William James, and Friedrich Nietzsche agree that a large part of experience escapes purely theoretical frameworks. We need nontheoretical, evocative narratives to make visible those parts of reality that are easily overlooked when we are focused on the practical and utilitarian side of existence. These philosophical theories, combined with the concept of “felt knowledge,” help determine where the current business narrative falls short and serve as a foundation for a few suggestions about how this narrative might be changed from within.

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The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Wendy S. Becker

Greenfields are new plants – typically, but not exclusively manufacturing – that belong to an existing organization. They are ideal settings for teams, but implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

Greenfields are new plants – typically, but not exclusively manufacturing – that belong to an existing organization. They are ideal settings for teams, but implementation of the technology and people systems during start‐up can be difficult. This review aims briefly to describe the origin of the greenfield concept, three decades of research, and recommendations for work practices that promote teams.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 37 research studies evaluating greenfield operations were located, including quasi‐experiments, surveys and case studies. A brief description of the study is provided, as well as information regarding productivity and employee attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

Findings

The paper finds that greenfields are frequently used to implement team‐based systems, with varying results. Outcomes such as productivity, quality, employee satisfaction, absenteeism and turnover are described. Research evaluating greenfields is limited due to proprietary and competitive concerns and the reluctance to discuss failures. Three broad areas in which greenfields are unique are identified and discussed in the interest of promoting future research; these include employee attitudes and behaviors, organizational culture and human resource practices.

Practical implications

A total of 24 human resource practices that support team‐based work systems in new greenfield plants are recommended and described.

Originality/value

This paper fills a void in the team literature by reviewing greenfield facilities as distinctive organizations for team‐based systems.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Patricia Grant

This paper seeks to provide an Aristotelian alternative to the neo‐classical paradigm for the development of sustainable business research and a preliminary explanation of

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an Aristotelian alternative to the neo‐classical paradigm for the development of sustainable business research and a preliminary explanation of how to implement the assumptions on the shopfloor.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a conceptual exploration and comparison of sustainable business, Aristotle's view of society and intra‐societal relations, and the neo‐classical model.

Findings

The paper shows how sustainable business research is supported by elements of the Aristotelian model and how this is not the case with the neo‐classical paradigm. Practical implications for corporate governance strategies are detailed.

Originality/value

This paper shows how Aristotelian philosophy may provide a rationale for the normative claims of sustainable business research.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Marty Stuebs, William Miller and Steven Mintz

This chapter explores practical wisdom’s role in managing the application and use of soft skills. The authors explore how practical wisdom can connect technical and soft…

Abstract

This chapter explores practical wisdom’s role in managing the application and use of soft skills. The authors explore how practical wisdom can connect technical and soft skills by developing moral skill and moral will to enhance ethical decision-making. Given practical wisdom’s importance, the authors further examine its role in the experiential learning process and how experiential learning activities like the Giving Voice to Values (GVV) curricular offering can bring practical wisdom and soft skills into the classroom with modest effort and investment. Through the application of the GVV methodology to a case study, the authors demonstrate how practical wisdom can be used in accounting education to support and advance accounting students’ moral and skill development, and accounting educators looking to do so can use this chapter as a starting point.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-758-9

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2016

Hugh Breakey

How can we explain the development – or equally the non-development – of professional ethics norms in a particular case? And how can we enhance compliance with existing…

Abstract

How can we explain the development – or equally the non-development – of professional ethics norms in a particular case? And how can we enhance compliance with existing professional ethical norms? In this chapter, I develop a supply/demand theory of professional ethics. That is, I consider the demand-forces and pull-factors that call for the construction, reform or continuance of a professional ethos. These demands may come from various stakeholders, including individual service-providers, the professional community, actual and prospective clients and the general public collectively as interested third parties. The supply-side, on the other hand, constitutes the ethical materiel out of which norms emerge: these are the felt-motivations of individual professionals at the coalface of action that drive them to recognize, acknowledge and act upon a professional norm. This material includes traditions and stories, the conscious application of common-sense ethics, explicit endorsement of public moral codes, internal excellences within the activity, a discrete community capable of cultivating attractive role-identities and so on. As well as considering such ethical-materiel, I canvas the institutional and cultural supports that facilitate the production of these motives.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Applied and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-443-3

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